Klamath Basin News, Monday, March 2 – Oregon Resident Dies from Coronavirus; Health Officials Warn To Stay on High Alert with Prevention Measures

Broadcasting’s KFLS News/Talk 1450AM/102.5FM, BasinLife.com and The Herald & News.

MONDAY, MARCH 2, 2020

Klamath Basin Weather

Today
Mostly sunny, with a high near 53. Light northwest winds to 15 mph.   Overnight, cloudy with a low around 29.

Tuesday
Sunny, with a high near 60. Overnight low of 28.

Wednesday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 61.

Thursday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 64.

Friday
Partly sunny, with a high near 57.  Overnight, rain possible mixed with snow flurries.  Snow level dropping from around 5200 feet lowering to 4200 feet after midnight . Mostly cloudy, with a low around 30.

Saturday
Snow likely. Partly sunny, with a high near 46.

Road Conditions

Traveling? Click and check these cameras below for the latest road conditions.

Lake of the Woods Hiway 140
Greensprings Drive at Hiway 97
Doak Mountain looking east
Chemult, Oregon
LaPine, Oregon
Bly, Oregon
Medford at I-5 -Biddle Road & Crater Lake Parkway

Today’s Headlines

The Klamath County Public Health Air Advisory is Green until noon today.

State officials confirmed Oregon’s first case of coronavirus Friday evening in an adult Washington County resident.

Saturday, Washington state officials announced the first death from the disease in the U.S. after a King County resident died overnight.

Friday, Klamath County Public Health announced steps it is taking to prepare for the potential spread of the coronavirus within the state and has updated protocols to keep Klamath County safe including creating a website for updates. KCPH officials have met with stakeholders around the communityand remain in contact with state and federal officials including the Oregon Health Authority.

10:30AM Monday Update.
Oregon health officials have identified a third presumptive positive case of COVID-19 among state residents. The third case is an adult Oregon resident from Umatilla County who is hospitalized in Walla Walla, Wash.

State and local health officials are moving quickly to contact people who may have been in close contact with the individual who tested as a presumptive positive case. The third case is not linked to travel to a part of the world with known cases of COVID-19. It is considered a case of community transmission.

The Oregon Health Authority will hold a conference call for media at noon Pacific Time. The call-in number is 1-888-363-4734; code 8221070.

The Flying T Ranch in Sprague Riverprovided free-range grass-fed beef for lunch in nearly all Klamath County School District schools this week and joined Shasta Elementary School students for lunch.

School cooks used the Flying T ground beef in gravy served over mashed potatoes.Serving local beef – the district purchased 1,400 pounds of ground beef from the Flying T last month – is among efforts districtwide to incorporate locally grown foods into school meals. The district partners with OSU Klamath Basin Extension Center using state and federal grant funds to purchase local and Oregon-grown foods, provide education, and offer Feed A Farmer and tasting events throughout the district.

Plans are in the works to serve Flying T Ranch beef from January through June 2021. Under a proposed agreement, Topham would sell about 6,000 pounds of ground beef to the school district, enough for schools to serve on their menus through the rest of the school year.

The Assistance League of Klamath Basin recently became a recipient of a one-year grant in the amount of $7,500 from the Cow Creek Umpqua Indian Foundation on Friday.A ceremony was held earlier this year to present the funds which will help provide new clothing and supplies to Klamath Basin K-12 children in need through Operation School Bell.

The Cow Creek Umpqua Indian Foundation was founded in 1997 and began its philanthropy to organizations in the seven south-western Oregon counties.

Anna Nicholas, an actress, director and screenwriter with over three decades of experience in film and television, will be the featured guest at Klamath Film’s monthly member meeting Thursday.

Nicholas, who will join the meeting via video chat from her home in Portland for an open dialogue with audience members about filmmaking, is the latest in a monthly guest series started this year by Klamath Film to connect film industry experts with professional and aspiring filmmakers in the Klamath Basin. Klamath Film meetings are held on the first Thursday of each month from 6-8 p.m. at the Waffle Hut Eatery banquet room.

While intended for Klamath Film members, the public is welcome to attend and the event is free.

Due to the resignation of board member Todd Kellstorm Basin Transit Service Transportation District Board of Directors have declared a vacancy on the Board of Directors.

Persons interested in filling this vacancy must submit an application to the Board of Directors to be considered for the appointment. Applications can be pickup at the District office at 1130 Adams Street. Only persons who live within the District boundaries are eligible to apply for this volunteer, non-paying position.Applicants may be interviewed by the Board of Directors.

The successful candidate will be appointed to fill out the term until June 30, 2021.Deadline for submittal of applications is Wednesday, March 18th.

Around the region

The families of two individuals who died skiing and snowboarding on Mt. Bachelor last year have filed a $30 million dollar lawsuit against the parent company of the resort, Powder Corporation.

19 year old Nicioe Panet-Raymond of Eugene and 24 year old Alfonso Braun of Bend both fell into tree wells on the mountain and suffocated. Tree wells are areas without snow that form under trees and can collapse down on someone who falls into them.

Both individuals died in separate incidents in 2018.

Oregon health officials have identified a third presumptive positive case of COVID-19 among state residents. The third case is an adult Oregon resident from Umatilla County who is hospitalized in Walla Walla, Wash.

State and local health officials are moving quickly to contact people who may have been in close contact with the individual who tested as a presumptive positive case. The third case is not linked to travel to a part of the world with known cases of COVID-19. It is considered a case of community transmission.

The Oregon Health Authority will hold a conference call for media at noon Pacific Time. The call-in number is 1-888-363-4734; code 8221070.

The second individual to have a test for COVID-19, with results pending yesterday, came back negative, the Oregon Health Authority is reporting.

OHA continues approving testing for persons under investigation, a number that’s likely to increase following the report of the state’s first presumptive case and new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance that calls for testing of anyone experiencing severe respiratory symptoms.

There now are seven pending test results for persons under investigation for COVID-19. Four tests have been completed—three were negative, and the fourth became Oregon’s first confirmed case. Eighty-eight persons are under monitoring.

Persons under investigation are individuals experiencing symptoms and are known to have one of the three primary risk factors:

  • Travel from a country where COVID-19 is circulating.
  • Close contact with a confirmed case.
  • People with severe respiratory illness who are hospitalized and have no other known diagnosis.

Persons under monitoring have had the same exposures but are not symptomatic.

OHA officials continue to recommend people in Oregon take everyday precautions to prevent the spread of many respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19 and influenza:

  • Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue and then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds. If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces that are often touched.
  • Take care of your health overall. Staying current on your vaccinations, including flu vaccine, eating well and exercising all help your body stay resilient.
  • Consult CDC’s travel website for any travel advisories and steps to protect yourself if you plan to travel outside of the US.

For more information:

For the 18th year, the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling dedicates March to help increase public awareness of problem gambling and the availability of prevention, treatment and recovery services. This coincides with the National Problem Gambling Awareness Month whose campaign theme is “Awareness + Action.”

“Problem Gambling Awareness Month is important to us because, although millions of Americans are affected by problem gambling, it’s one of the least talked about addictions,” said Executive Director of the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling Julie Hynes. “With the expansion of legalized gambling, we want to help people be aware that gambling isn’t risk-free. We want people who know they are affected by problem gambling that they are most definitely not alone—in fact, research shows that one in every 38 Oregon adults has a gambling problem.” 

National Problem Gambling Awareness Month is a grassroots effort that brings together a wide range of stakeholders – public health organizations, advocacy groups and gambling operators – who work collaboratively to let people know that hope and help exist.

Last year, visits to the Oregon Problem Gambling Resource website (www.opgr.org) increased dramatically during March as result of the focused marketing and outreach efforts.

“Creating awareness of problem gambling and available resources is a statewide commitment that is reflected in the official proclamation that Oregon Lottery and the Oregon Health Authority worked with the Governor’s office to develop,” added Lottery’s Senior Manager Product Market and Director of Corporate Social Responsibility Stacy Shaw, who is also an officer on the National Council on Problem Gambling board of directors.

“It’s great that people are seeking information,” Shaw added, “and we hope that the conversation and action continues to grow this year. We’re proud to be in a state that has robust system of prevention through treatment services that are free to anyone concerned about gambling problems, and we want people to know that they don’t have to worry about seeking help.

“This year we are focusing on letting people know that in Oregon treatment is really free, a message that’s important to people struggling with gambling issues.”

Roger Nyquist, a member of the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling as well as an Oregon Lottery retailer and county commissioner said awareness about treatment is key.

“I recognize the importance of an ongoing focus to ensure community awareness of the risks associated with gambling and the resources available for both prevention and treatment,” he said. “The impact of problem gambling extends beyond the gambler, affecting families, friends and communities.”

The Oregon Lottery’s commitment to problem gambling support is year-round. Since 1992, one percent of Oregon Lottery profits has funded problem gambling treatment and prevention efforts throughout Oregon. Since that time, over $100 million in Lottery funds has supported those services.

To get help for a gambling problem, anyone can call 1-877-MYLIMIT. Treatment is free, confidential and it works. For more information about problem gambling treatment, how to have the conversation or to chat with a specialist, go to Oregon Problem Gambling Resource at opgr.org

Klamath Falls News from partnership with the Herald and News, empowering the community.

…For complete details on these and other stories see today’s Herald & News.  Wynne Broadcasting and the Herald and News…stronger together to keep you informed.

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