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Klamath Basin News & Weather

 Klamath Falls News Update

 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2019  

    KLAMATH BASIN WEATHER

TODAY
Mostly sunny, with a high near 37.  Overnight, cloudy and a low around 19 degrees.

Friday
A 20 percent chance of snow showers after 11am. Otherwise partly sunny, with a high near 38.  Overnight low around 20.

Saturday
A 20 percent chance of snow. Partly sunny, with a high near 40. Overnight, cloudy with a low around 23.

Sunday
A 20 percent chance of snow showers. Partly sunny, with a high near 41. Low of 22.

Monday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 41.

  See Road Camera Views

Lake of the Woods   
Doak Mtn.   
Hiwy 97 at Chemult   
Hiwy 140 at  Bly       
Hiwy 97 at GreenSprings Dr.            
Hiway 97 at LaPine

   
         

TODAY’S KLAMATH FALLS AREA NEWS HEADLINES & STORIES…

Oregon Water Resources Department Holds Second Comment Gathering on Proposed Groundwater Pumping

Many of those who spoke about rules being proposed by Oregon Water Resources Department were opposed at least in part to changes that could impact the next two irrigation seasons in the Klamath Basin.

About 25 individuals braved inclement weather to attend the public session hosted by OWRD staff from Klamath Falls and Salem at Oregon Tech on Tuesday afternoon. The session is one of two recent meetings being used to compile comments on proposed new rules impacting groundwater wells in the Klamath Basin.

Public written comments on the proposed Oregon Administrative Rules will be accepted by staff for review no later than 5 p.m. on Monday, March 4.

The Oregon Water Commission will meet in mid-April to consider action on the rules.

Klamath County Fair To Feature Three Main Stage Entertainers This Summer

The Klamath County Fair Board welcomes not one, not two, but three main stage entertainers to the 2019 Klamath County Fair, which will be Aug. 1 through 4, according to a news release.

Presenting three nights of main stage entertainment will be country music group Midland, country singer songwriter Jon Wolfe and country music group Lonestar, with their “Hits and More Hits” 2019 tour.

Concert tickets for these performances will be available Monday, March 4 at www.kcfairgrounds.org and in the Klamath County Fairground’s office.

Ford Family Foundation Presentation in Chiloquin Today

CHILOQUIN — An open meeting on projects to make improvements in Chiloquin will be held from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday in the Chiloquin Community Center, according to a news release.

Included will be 12 project leaders who will be giving a report to the Ford Family Foundation director with the hope that the foundation will provide financial support.

Also volunteers are being sought.

Tax Credit Kicker, Kicks In

SALEM (AP) — Revenues in Oregon have soared beyond expectations, according to the state’s economic office, which could mean an extra tax credit for taxpayers next year.

The state is forecasted to bring in $20.6 billion by the end of June, which is $147 million and over 4 percent more than what economists originally predicted, according to the state’s Economic and Revenue Forecast released Wednesday. But the Legislature will have to return some of that money to taxpayers under the so-called “two percent kicker” law, which refunds excess revenue when the state’s coffers are more than 2 percent higher than forecasted.

 
   
…For complete details on these and other stories see todays Herald & News.  Wynne Broadcasting and the Herald and News…stronger together to keep you informed.

SNOW DAYS ARE WORK DAYS FOR DISTRICT MAINTENANCE CREW

Unpredictable storm system closes Gilchrist for 3 days; everyone gets Wednesday ‘snow day’

Snow days for students are an unexpected day off – a reprieve from classes and homework.

But snow days for the Klamath County School District maintenance crew are just that – days spent plowing and shoveling the white stuff.  A winter storm that shut down highways around the state and dropped several inches snow throughout the county forced the district to close some schools two hours early on Tuesday and cancel classes at all schools Wednesday due to weather and road conditions.

The snow day gave the district’s maintenance crew a chance to clear parking lots, roofs and walkways at the district’s 23 schools. In Gilchrist, in far northern Klamath County, school has been closed since Monday after the storm dumped around three-feet of snow in the area. Bend, Sisters and La Pine schools also were closed.

District maintenance workers have spent three days digging the school out – shoveling roofs and clearing parking lots and walkways. Roads in the area are still open, but navigating them is slow-going, said Dennis Zullo, project manager and maintenance supervisor for the school district. Walkways around the school were bordered by 2-foot-high berms of snow.

Steve Prock, principal at Gilchrist Junior-Senior High School, said it started snowing in Gilchrist Sunday and didn’t stop. “Travel was a mess, and a lot of our side streets weren’t plowed,” he said Tuesday afternoon, adding that it was still snowing at that time. On Wednesday, school district maintenance crew members – who start at 3:30 a.m. on snow days – cleared school parking lots throughout the district and then traveled to Gilchrist to finish clearing snow from roofs and the rest of the campus, which includes the elementary and junior-senior high school.

KCSD Superintendent Glen Szymoniak said this storm system made the decision of whether to delay or close school difficult.

“The unpredictable forecast early this week, which vacillated between snow and rain, made it hard to decide whether to delay or cancel,” he said.

On Tuesday, snow began piling up in the outlying areas – Bonanza, Lost River, Merrill, Malin, and Chiloquin – and a decision was made to release those students early. That decision, in part, was based on information from the Oregon Department of Transportation.

“As the morning progressed and snow started to accumulate at different rates at different locations, ODOT let us know that they would be able to keep up at some locations and roads would be better late in the day,” Szymoniak said. “We continued school in those locations.”

The district relies on its transportation and maintenance departments as well as ODOT for recommendations on school delays or closures.

“We look at current conditions as well as the forecast for the upcoming day,” Szymoniak said.

“(Monday) we saw the moisture coming on radar. However, due to temperatures hovering around freezing, there was conflicting information whether it would be rain or snow that fell.” Zullo said the district tries to plow school campuses after 2 inches of snow falls.

On Tuesday, it piled up quickly in some of the outlying areas – by the time Lost River and Bonanza schools released on Tuesday, there was about 6 to 8 inches of snow on the ground. When schools are delayed or closed, the district calls or texts parents through its One Call Now system, posts the information on its website (www.kscd.k12.or.us) and social media sites and notifies the media. If there is no news, that means schools are operating on their regular schedules.

-Marcia Schlottmann, Public Relations, Klamath County School District

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2019  

 TODAY’S KLAMATH FALLS AREA NEWS HEADLINES & STORIES…

Wednesday Bulletin:  Due to winter weather conditions, all Klamath County School District schools are CLOSED today, Wednesday, February 27th.  

Klamath Falls City Schools are OPEN today, with a late start for today, Wednesday, Feb. 27th,

Oregon Tech will start at 10AM today, due to weather conditions.

Other School Closures for Wednesday:
EagleRidge High School
Hosanna Christian
New Horizon 
Our Place to Grow 
Klamath Family Head Start 
Sage Community School 
Shasta Way Christian
Miss Muffetts

Snow Storm Continues To Pound Southern Oregon

The massive snow storm that blanketed Southern Oregon Tuesday caused schools to shorten their day, businesses to close, uncountable car wrecks and even gas stations to run out of fuel. A Klamath Falls worker at Fred Meyer told an incoming customer there is no regular or premium gas on Tuesday morning. The station was waiting for an truckload of gas, which was stuck in transit, according Fuel Manager Keith Gibson. The delivery of gas was made to the station later Tuesday morning.

Extreme Winter Weather in Southern Oregon Continues

An extreme weather system on Tuesday went under the radar while still managing to blanket much of the southern Oregon region, including the Klamath Basin, and around the state with snow.

The weather that essentially snuck up on the region had the prime ingredients of a unique storm, according to meteorologist Brian Nieuwenhuis, of the National Weather Station based in Medford.

“This is a very rare type system, something that most of us haven’t seen before,” Nieuwenhuis said.

“It’s a cold atmospheric river … like the Pineapple Express, it’s a warm rain. In this case it was cold.”

The weather front came down, draped over the region, and capitalized on cold air with moisture on top of it, according to Nieuwenhuis.

Meanwhile: 

Passengers Band Together on Stuck Amtrak Train Near Oakridge, Oregon

An Amtrak train with almost 200 people aboard hit downed trees during a blizzard and got stranded in the mountains west of Oakridge for a day and a half, but passengers and crew banded together during the ordeal that ended Tuesday.

“It was really nice to meet people pulling together,” passenger Tracy Rhodes, of Scottsdale, Arizona, said in a phone interview after the train that was traveling from Seattle to Los Angeles rolled back into Eugene, with a clanging bell announcing its arrival. Passengers spilled out, some waving their arms high in jubilation.

During the 36 hours that the train was stuck, younger passengers helped older ones reach their families to let them know they were all right, said Rhodes, who was traveling with her brother to visit their 82-year-old mother in Klamath Falls. A “mom brigade” was formed to take care of and entertain the children, she said.

“People were being very kind to each other, being friends,” Rhodes said. “It restores your faith.”

Rain Prompts Evacuations in California

North of San Francisco, torrential rain from a winter storm that has also dumped heavy snow in mountainous areas prompted California authorities to urge thousands of residents to evacuate a town north of the bay area.

Residents of Guerneville, population 4,500, were told to evacuate homes and businesses because the Russian River was expected to overflow Tuesday night when it reaches 32 feet (10 meters).

The river was expected to crest Wednesday night at 46 feet (14 meters) in the community 75 miles (120 kilometers) north of San Francisco.

Oregon Is First State To Impose Rent Control

SALEM (AP) — Oregon will become the first state in the nation to impose statewide mandatory rent control after lawmakers passed a measure that will establish protections for people in the increasingly competitive housing market.

The House approved the landmark bill 35-25 on Tuesday, over objections from Republicans who argued rent control will discourage investment and do little to address the state’s affordable housing crisis.

The measure, which previously passed the Senate, will now head to Gov. Kate Brown, who has said she will sign it. The bill will take effect immediately, as Democrats say the housing crisis constitutes an emergency.

Rep. Mark Meek, a Democrat from Oregon City who sponsored the bill in the House, said the measure will address the state’s homelessness problem and provide Oregon residents “some predictability and stability with their expenses.”

 
 
 …For complete details on these and other stories see todays Herald & News.  Wynne Broadcasting and the Herald and News…stronger together to keep you informed.

MAZAMA HIGH SCHOOL TO INDUCT 40 INTO STEM&M PROGRAM

Forty Mazama High School students on Wednesday will be inducted into the school’s STEM&M program, which partners with Oregon Institute of Technology and puts them on academic pathways in science, technology, engineering, math and medicine.

“This is the largest group so far and is representative of the high level of achievements and dedication of this incoming class of 2022,” said Laura Nickerson, a Mazama teacher and STEM&M advisor.

“It’s also the first year we have seen a large number of students transfer to Mazama for possible admission into STEM&M, many of whom were successful in gaining acceptance.”

The ceremony will be from 12:35-1:15 pm. In the Mazama High School library. To apply, students had to submit transcripts, three letters of recommendation and an application essay. Mazama staff grade applications using a 240-point rubric. Students who scored 85 percent or higher were invited to join the STEM&M cohort.

This year, of 48 applications from the freshman class, 40 students were accepted into the program. At the induction ceremony, students will sign STEM&M contracts stating they will keep their GPAs at a 3.0 or greater, they will take four credits of pathway coursework while at Mazama and take 10 STEM&M Oregon Institute Technology credits. Students choose a pathway (science, technology, engineering, math or medical) and receive their STEM&M shirt.

“We outline our expectations of them, including how they will need to participate in a wide variety of outside STEM&M activities — we call them STEM&M points,” Nickerson explained.

“We treat it like an athletic signing day where kids come up and sign and get their photo taken. Parents are invited and we have representatives from the school district and OIT.”

There are a wide variety of perks that come with being a STEM&M student, Nickerson said. STEM&M students receive a chromebook for as long as they are in the program, $9,500 in scholarship funds from OIT, preferential selection into some of OIT’s competitive programs and recognition at graduation.

 

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2019  

 
 TODAY’S KLAMATH FALLS AREA NEWS HEADLINES & STORIES…

Snow Storm Wreaks Havoc Across Oregon

The most recent storm to blow across Oregon that started Sunday and hasn’t let up, has dumped heavy snow in many parts of the state, resulting in difficult driving conditions and an even worse scenario for train passengers.

Amtrak has shut down train service to Klamath County as a result of heavy snow drifts on tracks, which also caused closure of Highway 58 and the Santiam Pass due to heavy snow, downed power lines, and even avalanches in select areas.

On Monday, parts of Merrill and Malin were also without power due to multiple power poles being toppled, while much of Roseburg and the Douglas County area were also without power on Monday.

Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) reported as of Monday afternoon that crews were working to remove a downed power line across southbound lanes of Interstate-5 south of Cottage Grove. Additionally, U.S. 101 was closed at milepost 343 north of Brookings, with no detour available.

and there’s more on the way….

Record-breaking Snowfall in Bend Area  

Monday was a record-breaking snow day in Central Oregon, as winter storm systems closed schools and businesses on both sides of the Cascades, including the Redmond airport.

The National Weather Service recorded 12.5 inches falling on Bend over a 24-hour period. That broke a century-old record for February, as flurries continued accumulating Monday afternoon. It was the fifth snowiest winter day in Bend since record-keeping started in 1901.

Prineville also got a superlative 24-hour dump, with 9.9 inches breaking the previous record of 1.5 inches for Feb. 25 snowfall, set in 1924. Monday marked the second highest single day accumulation for a single day in February in the town’s history.

Mount Shasta Avalanche Possibly Largest in Recent History

A massive avalanche that thundered down Mount Shasta last week is being called possibly the largest in the mountain’s recent history.

The natural avalanche occurred off Casaval Ridge between the afternoon of Feb. 13 and the morning of Feb. 14. According to the Mount Shasta Avalanche Center, the avalanche likely began near the 12,000-foot elevation of Shasta — its summit elevation is 14,162 feet — and flowed on the southeast side of the mountain to the 7,200-foot level down Avalanche Gulch, about 5,000 vertical feet and a distance of more than three miles.

Avalanche Gulch is alongside the mountain’s most popular south side climbing route, sometimes called the Climber’s Gully. Mostly climbs are done between June and September.

Klamath Falls Police Nab 27 Pounds of Meth, 2 Suspects
Arrests last Thursday of two individuals resulted in seizure of 27 pounds of methamphetamine, an equivalent street value of approximately $500,000.

Klamath Falls Police Department made a traffic stop on Highway 97 south of Dan O’Brien Way of a SUV with California plates. During the stop officers grew suspicious and requested to search the vehicle, eventually being granted consent to do so.

The search resulted in officers discovering modifications to the vehicle including a hidden compartment, in which were stored several large individually wrapped bundles of methamphetamine, according to authorities. Approximately 27 pounds of methamphetamine was recovered from the vehicle.

Both occupants of the vehicle, Roger Gutierrez Ayala, 24, and Fernanda Tores Sanchez, 19, of Yakima, Wash., were arrested on charges of unlawful possession and delivery of methamphetamine. Bail for both Ayala and Sanchez was set at $500,000 each.

Oregon State Police Department assisted Klamath Falls Police Department in the investigation.

If individuals have tips about possible drug transportation within Klamath Falls they are urged to contact Klamath Falls Police Department at 541-883-5336.

   
…For complete details on these and other stories see todays Herald & News.  Wynne Broadcasting and the Herald and News…stronger together to keep you informed.

Monday, Feb. 25, 2019

Fatal Crash Spring Lake Road and Old Midland Road

On Saturday, Feb. 23rd, Klamath 911 received a report of a single vehicle rollover with injuries on Spring Lake Road near Old Midland Road. Klamath County Sheriff’s deputies, Klamath Fire District 1, and Kingsley Field Fire responded.

Witness and first responders attempted life saving measures of from injuries suffered during the crash with no avail.

Levi James Ditmore, 26 years of age, from Merrill, OR was pronounced deceased at the scene. Ditmore was the single occupant. Alcohol and speed are being investigated as factors in the crash.

CUTS FOR CANCER

Thank you to everyone who participaged in the Klamath Falls Cuts For Cancer fundraiser.  A total of 24 stylists, 5 nail techs representing 12 salons performed 100 haircuts and 28 manicures.   

The effort brought in a total of $2417 dollars.  This was from services, raffle tickets for a Michael Kors purse that was donated and also from jewelry and makeup that was sold during the event.  This brings the total raised over 22 years to $50,826.58.

Senator Merkley, Local Stakeholders Announce Major Investments in Klamath Basin

Oregon’s U.S. Sen. Jeff Merkley, joined by representatives from Klamath-area irrigation districts and tribes​, today announced significant investments in the Klamath Basin were included in the 2019 spending bills that recently were passed by Congress and signed by the president.

“These big national bills often seem far removed from the concerns of life on the ground here in Oregon. But included in the spending package were bipartisan agricultural investments that are having real, lasting, on-the-ground impacts in rural communities throughout our state—including right here in the Klamath Basin,” Merkley said. “As the top Democrat on the Agriculture and Rural Development Subcommittee, and the only member of the Oregon delegation in either chamber to serve on the appropriations committee, I will continue to work to ensure that programs critical to Oregon’s farmers, ranchers and tribes are funded, and that those in the Klamath Basin and agricultural communities across our state have the resources and support that they need to thrive.”

“Stability for our farms, survival of the species and success of our community all hinge on addressing the issues in collaborative, creative ways,” said Tricia Hill, owner of Gold Dust & Walker Farms. “To have support of Senator Merkley not only helps to bring us together, it gives us the ability to actually come up with a long-term solution that benefits us all. Thank you, Senator.”

“I thank Senator Merkley for bringing folks in the Basin together to look at the real issues affecting Klamath Lake and the fish that are so important to us,” said Don Gentry, chairman of the Klamath Tribes. “I thank him for holding the Sucker Recovery Summit in November and for the $4 million in federal support for our propagation projects. We are committed to continuing to move things in the right direction to improve water quality and the health of the C’waam and Koptu.”

“Senator Merkley has been working hard for our farms, the Klamath Tribes and habitat. He has secured over $75 million in the last three years with $25 million in the last year for irrigation modernization,”said Mason Terry, board member of Morocco Point Irrigation District. “Let’s honor his hard work by doing what each of us can to protect the environment, help our basin’s economy and come to a sustainable solution to the crisis upon us. Irrigation modernization is crucial for the Klamath Basin to recover the endangered sucker, pave the way for the return of the salmon and provide water predictability for farming families so all can thrive.”

Merkley is the only Oregon member of Congress from either chamber since Senator Mark Hatfield to serve on the Appropriations Committee, considered to be one of the most powerful on Capitol Hill. As the top Democrat on the Agriculture and Rural Development Appropriations Subcommittee, Merkley helped write the Agriculture and Rural Development bill, securing billions of dollars of investments to help rural communities across Oregon and across the country, including funding to help address water resource issues in the Klamath Basin.

Investments that will benefit agricultural communities in Oregon include:

Klamath Basin Water and Wildlife Conservation: Merkley continued his support progress toward a long-term water resource solution in the Klamath Basin by securing $4 million for local efforts, including $3.5 million to support strategies to restore fish habitat and scale up ongoing USFWS and Klamath Tribes’ efforts to restore healthy populations of shortnose and Lost River sucker fish.

Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILT): The bill includes $500 million for the PILT program to fund vital services for rural communities, including public safety, social services, transportation and housing. This funding goes to Oregon counties, including Klamath, that have large tracts of federal land, which doesn’t pay property taxes.

Agricultural Research: The Agricultural Research Service received an increase of over $300 million in funding to for cutting-edge research to improve the productivity, sustainability, and health of our nation’s agricultural systems. Merkley also secured funding for key Oregon agriculture research programs on Sudden Oak Death, alfalfa, pear, wheat, hops, apple, shellfish, small fruits, seaweed, floriculture, and nurseries.

Water Conservation and Habitat Restoration: For the third consecutive year, the Watershed and Flood Prevention Operations program received $150 million, including funding for irrigation districts that need to improve water efficiency and conservation or otherwise improve fish and wildlife habitat. This program is providing critical funding for the collaborative process underway in the Deschutes Basin to conserve water and improve the habitat of the spotted frog, helping to keep Central Oregon family farms in business. Modoc Point Irrigation District and several Project irrigation districts are currently in planning process and will be able to access this funding as soon as their planning is complete.

Wildfire Prevention: The bill includes funding increases for several programs to prevent wildfires, reduce hazardous fuels, and support important research activities. The U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land Management each received an additional $5 million for hazardous fuels reduction. The Joint Fire Science Program, which funds fire management research focused on applied research, received an additional $3 million. Merkley also protected funding for vegetation and water management activities within national forests

Wildfire Management: In anticipation of the coming fire season, Merkley secured $2.5 billion for fire suppression at the Forest Service and Department of the Interior, which is $100 million above the last fiscal year. In the omnibus, Congress enacted a provision to allow federal agencies to use disaster money to fund fire suppression efforts beyond a certain point. Unfortunately, the provision does not come into effect until Fiscal Year 2020. The additional $508 million included in the bill will help minimize the amount of money borrowed from fire prevention and other forest management programs to pay for wildfire fighting during this fire season.

Collaborative Forest Management: The bill includes $40 million for the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP), which was targeted for elimination in the President’s budget. Oregon has three active CFLR projects: Southern Blues Restoration Coalition Collaborative Landscape Restoration Project, Deschutes Collaborative Forest Project, and Lakeview Collaborative Landscape Restoration Project. In the 2018 Farm Bill, Merkley won authorization to double the size of the program in future budgets.

Salmon Management: Programs to help manage salmon populations, which include the operations and maintenance of Mitchell Act hatcheries and the implementation of the Pacific Salmon Treaty, received $37 million, a $1.5 million increase. 

Salmon Recovery: The Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund received $65 million. President Trump proposed eliminating this competitive grant program, which is designed to address declining Pacific salmon and steelhead populations by supporting conservation efforts in California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Alaska. Since 2000, the program has funded $3 billion in projects—including $1.3 billion in awards and $1.7 billion in state and other matching funds—that have helped prevent the extinction of the 28 listed salmon and steelhead species on the West Coast. This funding can be an expanded source of money for restoration projects in the Upper Basin after the Klamath dams are removed and salmon return to Upper Klamath Lake and beyond.

 

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2019  

City outlines reasons for $1 price tag of ‘Balsiger block’

Even if the land itself goes for $1, any developer of the Balsiger block would have to specifically build what the city hopes could become the new “gateway” property.

Talks continue for a new mixed-use housing and retail spot in downtown Klamath Falls, which the city hopes could spur new development and get a longtime vacant property back on the tax rolls.

Klamath County School District students testify before House Education Committee

Students from Gilchrist, Lost River, Chiloquin and Bonanza high schools, members of Klamath County School District’s Legislative Team, traveled to the Capitol in Salem Monday to testify before the House Committee on Education. They urged lawmakers to support a bill that would guarantee their schools continue to receive $2.2 million in small school funding.

KU arts wing to be called by his name – James Ivory

Before James Ivory was known as an Academy Award winner, he was known as Jim Ivory, and for being the best dressed male student at Klamath Union High School in 1946, according to an “El Rodeo” yearbook photograph.

Ivory, 90, has come a long way since flying the Pel’s nest, being the oldest individual to take home the Oscar, for his 2018 adaptation of a screenplay for “Call Me By Your Name.”

And now he has a new accomplishment to add to a host of others: The performing arts building, undergoing renovations at KU – his alma mater – will be called by his name.

Inside today’s Herald and News, the latest edition of “Klamath Life”

In the latest edition of the H&N’s regional magazine, “Klamath Life,” read about passions and pastimes from vintage cars to newborn pups.

 
   …For complete details on these and other stories see todays Herald & News.  Wynne Broadcasting and the Herald and News…stronger together to keep you informed

Thursday, Feb. 21, 2019

Balsiger For  A Buck?   City Enters Into Exclusive Negotiating Agreement with Portland Developer

In a pinch, $1 could pay for a cheeseburger or chicken sandwich at a fast food stop.

For a Portland-based developer, it could also be enough to buy the “Balsiger block” at Main Street and Esplanade Avenue in Klamath Falls.

City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to enter into exclusive negotiation agreements with Project, a Portland-based developer with plans to build a housing, retail and office space at the entrance to downtown.

But within these agreements is an interesting price tag: $1 for the land, which the city would make “development ready” after demolishing an existing garage and filling in the basement of a previous building.

Expansion of Fire Protection Resources Considered

Fire chiefs, Klamath County Commissioners and other local leaders are coming together to expand and strengthen fire protection services to residents in districts without a designated fire fighting agency.

At a Wednesday morning commissioners meeting, officials from local fire districts including Klamath County Fire District 1, Chiloquin and Keno came together to advocate for a plan to streamline fire resources. Fire officials told commissioners that when structure fires or wildfires catch in places where no agency has jurisdiction, response can be slow and confusing.

Klamath Film to screen Oscar-nominated Short Films Saturday

In preparation for the biggest night in Hollywood, a series of short films nominated for the 91st annual Academy Awards will be shown Saturday at Pelican Cinemas courtesy of Klamath Film.

The special screening at the Pelican Cinemas will include animated shorts, starting at 5 p.m. Saturday, followed by live-action short films at 6:30 p.m. There will be a brief intermission after the animated short films conclude. A total of 10 films will be screened, each nominated for 2019 Oscars. 

Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019

DATE: Feb. 20, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Henley Complex schools on lockdown for 30 minutes Students playing with a BB gun pistol that appeared to be a handgun caused Henley Complex schools to go into a lockdown for about 30 minutes today.

The lockdown occurred at about 9 a.m. after students recorded a video of two other students playing with a BB gun pistol that was a replica of a handgun. They quickly reported the incident to administration, the Henley Complex was put into a lockdown and law enforcement responded.

The two students playing with the BB gun were immediately detained and the BB gun was confiscated from the vehicle by Klamath County sheriff deputies.

At 9:30 a.m., the Henley Complex was released from lockdown and regular school operations resumed. The Henley Complex appreciates the observance of students who made the report to help create a safe environment and the sheriff’s department quick response.

Army veteran returns to Klamath to lead irrigation district

Klamath Irrigation District manager Gene Souza started at the district earlier this month following a 30-year career with the U.S. Army.  KID Board President Ty Kliewer told the H&N in January that they were looking for an individual who could responsibly, ethically and diligently move the district forward, with a bent toward attention to detail.

“Gene is a phenomenally talented individual with a long commitment to service of both the public and his country,” Kliewer said. “I am very excited at what he’s going to bring to the district.”

Total transient room tax collection increases

According to Klamath County Tax Collector Rick Vaughn’s numbers, overall yearly amount of Klamath County transient room tax dollars has steadily increased since 2016 — which may indicate an increase in overall tourism.

Vaughn said the 8 percent tax on temporary residential facilities like hotels and Airbnbs goes toward tourism and growth promotion in Klamath County.

Merkley to hold town hall in Klamath, Lake counties Saturday

U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley will hold town halls in Klamath and Lake counties on Saturday.   The Klamath County Town Hall will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at Oregon Institute of Technology in the Mazama-Scott Room of the College Union, followed by the Lake County Town Hall at 4 p.m.

Saturday at the Paisley Community Center at 705 Chewaucan St., in Paisley.

 
   …For complete details on these and other stories see todays Herald & News.  Wynne Broadcasting and the Herald and News…stronger together to keep you informed.
 

 

 

Klamath Falls News Update

…CONTRIBUTIONS FROM PAUL HANSON, KFLS 1450

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2019

    KLAMATH BASIN WEATHER

TODAY
Mostly sunny, with a high near 31 Overnight low around 12.

Friday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 34.  Overnight, snow flurries, less than one inch of new snow.

Saturday
Snow likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 36. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible, with an overnight low around 24.

Sunday
A chance of snow showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 35.

  See Road Views:   Lake of the Woods    Doak Mtn.   Hiwy 97 at Chemult
Hiwy 140 at  Bly       Hiwy 97 at GreenSprings Dr.            Hiway 97 at LaPine


TODAY’S KLAMATH FALLS AREA NEWS HEADLINES & STORIES…

Balsiger For  A Buck?   City Enters Into Exclusive Negotiating Agreement with Portland Developer

In a pinch, $1 could pay for a cheeseburger or chicken sandwich at a fast food stop.

For a Portland-based developer, it could also be enough to buy the “Balsiger block” at Main Street and Esplanade Avenue in Klamath Falls.

City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to enter into exclusive negotiation agreements with Project, a Portland-based developer with plans to build a housing, retail and office space at the entrance to downtown.

But within these agreements is an interesting price tag: $1 for the land, which the city would make “development ready” after demolishing an existing garage and filling in the basement of a previous building.

Expansion of Fire Protection Resources Considered

Fire chiefs, Klamath County Commissioners and other local leaders are coming together to expand and strengthen fire protection services to residents in districts without a designated fire fighting agency.

At a Wednesday morning commissioners meeting, officials from local fire districts including Klamath County Fire District 1, Chiloquin and Keno came together to advocate for a plan to streamline fire resources. Fire officials told commissioners that when structure fires or wildfires catch in places where no agency has jurisdiction, response can be slow and confusing.

Klamath Film to screen Oscar-nominated Short Films Saturday

In preparation for the biggest night in Hollywood, a series of short films nominated for the 91st annual Academy Awards will be shown Saturday at Pelican Cinemas courtesy of Klamath Film.

The special screening at the Pelican Cinemas will include animated shorts, starting at 5 p.m. Saturday, followed by live-action short films at 6:30 p.m. There will be a brief intermission after the animated short films conclude. A total of 10 films will be screened, each nominated for 2019 Oscars.

Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019

DATE: Feb. 20, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Henley Complex schools on lockdown for 30 minutes Students playing with a BB gun pistol that appeared to be a handgun caused Henley Complex schools to go into a lockdown for about 30 minutes today.

The lockdown occurred at about 9 a.m. after students recorded a video of two other students playing with a BB gun pistol that was a replica of a handgun. They quickly reported the incident to administration, the Henley Complex was put into a lockdown and law enforcement responded.

The two students playing with the BB gun were immediately detained and the BB gun was confiscated from the vehicle by Klamath County sheriff deputies.

At 9:30 a.m., the Henley Complex was released from lockdown and regular school operations resumed. The Henley Complex appreciates the observance of students who made the report to help create a safe environment and the sheriff’s department quick response.

Army veteran returns to Klamath to lead irrigation district

Klamath Irrigation District manager Gene Souza started at the district earlier this month following a 30-year career with the U.S. Army.  KID Board President Ty Kliewer told the H&N in January that they were looking for an individual who could responsibly, ethically and diligently move the district forward, with a bent toward attention to detail.

“Gene is a phenomenally talented individual with a long commitment to service of both the public and his country,” Kliewer said. “I am very excited at what he’s going to bring to the district.”

Total transient room tax collection increases

According to Klamath County Tax Collector Rick Vaughn’s numbers, overall yearly amount of Klamath County transient room tax dollars has steadily increased since 2016 — which may indicate an increase in overall tourism.

Vaughn said the 8 percent tax on temporary residential facilities like hotels and Airbnbs goes toward tourism and growth promotion in Klamath County.

Merkley to hold town hall in Klamath, Lake counties Saturday

U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley will hold town halls in Klamath and Lake counties on Saturday.   The Klamath County Town Hall will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at Oregon Institute of Technology in the Mazama-Scott Room of the College Union, followed by the Lake County Town Hall at 4 p.m.

Saturday at the Paisley Community Center at 705 Chewaucan St., in Paisley.

 
   …For complete details on these and other stories see todays Herald & News.  Wynne Broadcasting and the Herald and News…stronger together to keep you informed.
 
 

KCC and Oregon Tech launch Badger to Owl Connection

KLAMATH FALLS – Klamath Community College and Oregon Tech are celebrating a new partnership designed to help students complete degrees at both institutions, while saving thousands in tuition. The new program, called Badger to Owl Connection, allows qualifying KCC graduates to receive tuition waivers for two terms at Oregon Tech.

According to KCC President Dr. Roberto Gutierrez, Badger to Owl Connection promotes college access, affordability, and bachelor’s degree completion for more students.

“The student support and financial incentives this new program provides means more access to higher education in our local community than ever before,” Gutierrez said.

“It’s an opportunity too good to pass up.” Students who want to take advantage of Badger to Owl Connection must complete an associate degree at KCC and plan to transfer to Oregon Tech to earn a bachelor’s degree.

“Oregon Tech is committed to our partnership with KCC to make higher education more accessible and affordable for Klamath Basin residents,” said Oregon Tech President Dr. Nagi Naganathan.

“Our long-term partnership makes it possible for students to begin their college career at KCC and then pursue a bachelor’s degree at Oregon Tech, in a cost-effective way that meets students’ goals.”

KCC graduates participating in the Badger to Owl Connection must have a minimum 3.0 GPA to qualify for the tuition waivers. The waivers will be applied to first and last term tuition, up to 15 credits each. The first Badger to Owl cohort begins fall 2019.

The deadline to apply for fall term enrollment at Oregon Tech is March 1. Students who transfer to KCC from other community colleges can qualify for Badger to Owl Connection. Participating students may also utilize KCC scholarships, Oregon Promise, and KCC’s 15 to Finish, which covers the cost of three credits for students taking 15 or more credits.

Once at Oregon Tech, students can apply for other scholarships, along with the Badger to Owl first and last term waivers, to help pay for a bachelor’s degree. For more information or to complete a Badger to Owl Connection application and a personal success plan, call KCC at 541-882-3521 or Oregon Tech at 541-885-1000, or visit the institutions’ websites.

 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 2019

    KLAMATH BASIN WEATHER

TODAY
Mostly sunny, with a high near 31 Overnight low around 12.

Friday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 34.  Overnight, snow flurries, less than one inch of new snow.

Saturday
Snow likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 36. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible, with an overnight low around 24.

Sunday
A chance of snow showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 35.

  See Road Views:   Lake of the Woods    Doak Mtn.   Hiwy 97 at Chemult
Hiwy 140 at  Bly       Hiwy 97 at GreenSprings Dr.            Hiway 97 at LaPine


TODAY’S KLAMATH FALLS AREA NEWS HEADLINES & STORIES…

Balsiger For  A Buck?   City Enters Into Exclusive Negotiating Agreement with Portland Developer

In a pinch, $1 could pay for a cheeseburger or chicken sandwich at a fast food stop.

For a Portland-based developer, it could also be enough to buy the “Balsiger block” at Main Street and Esplanade Avenue in Klamath Falls.

City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to enter into exclusive negotiation agreements with Project, a Portland-based developer with plans to build a housing, retail and office space at the entrance to downtown.

But within these agreements is an interesting price tag: $1 for the land, which the city would make “development ready” after demolishing an existing garage and filling in the basement of a previous building.

Expansion of Fire Protection Resources Considered

Fire chiefs, Klamath County Commissioners and other local leaders are coming together to expand and strengthen fire protection services to residents in districts without a designated fire fighting agency.

At a Wednesday morning commissioners meeting, officials from local fire districts including Klamath County Fire District 1, Chiloquin and Keno came together to advocate for a plan to streamline fire resources. Fire officials told commissioners that when structure fires or wildfires catch in places where no agency has jurisdiction, response can be slow and confusing.

Klamath Film to screen Oscar-nominated Short Films Saturday

In preparation for the biggest night in Hollywood, a series of short films nominated for the 91st annual Academy Awards will be shown Saturday at Pelican Cinemas courtesy of Klamath Film.

The special screening at the Pelican Cinemas will include animated shorts, starting at 5 p.m. Saturday, followed by live-action short films at 6:30 p.m. There will be a brief intermission after the animated short films conclude. A total of 10 films will be screened, each nominated for 2019 Oscars.

Wednesday, Feb. 20, 2019

DATE: Feb. 20, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Henley Complex schools on lockdown for 30 minutes Students playing with a BB gun pistol that appeared to be a handgun caused Henley Complex schools to go into a lockdown for about 30 minutes today.

The lockdown occurred at about 9 a.m. after students recorded a video of two other students playing with a BB gun pistol that was a replica of a handgun. They quickly reported the incident to administration, the Henley Complex was put into a lockdown and law enforcement responded.

The two students playing with the BB gun were immediately detained and the BB gun was confiscated from the vehicle by Klamath County sheriff deputies.

At 9:30 a.m., the Henley Complex was released from lockdown and regular school operations resumed. The Henley Complex appreciates the observance of students who made the report to help create a safe environment and the sheriff’s department quick response.

Army veteran returns to Klamath to lead irrigation district

Klamath Irrigation District manager Gene Souza started at the district earlier this month following a 30-year career with the U.S. Army.  KID Board President Ty Kliewer told the H&N in January that they were looking for an individual who could responsibly, ethically and diligently move the district forward, with a bent toward attention to detail.

“Gene is a phenomenally talented individual with a long commitment to service of both the public and his country,” Kliewer said. “I am very excited at what he’s going to bring to the district.”

Total transient room tax collection increases

According to Klamath County Tax Collector Rick Vaughn’s numbers, overall yearly amount of Klamath County transient room tax dollars has steadily increased since 2016 — which may indicate an increase in overall tourism.

Vaughn said the 8 percent tax on temporary residential facilities like hotels and Airbnbs goes toward tourism and growth promotion in Klamath County.

Merkley to hold town hall in Klamath, Lake counties Saturday

U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley will hold town halls in Klamath and Lake counties on Saturday.   The Klamath County Town Hall will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at Oregon Institute of Technology in the Mazama-Scott Room of the College Union, followed by the Lake County Town Hall at 4 p.m.

Saturday at the Paisley Community Center at 705 Chewaucan St., in Paisley.

 
   …For complete details on these and other stories see todays Herald & News.  Wynne Broadcasting and the Herald and News…stronger together to keep you informed.
 
 

KCC and Oregon Tech launch Badger to Owl Connection

KLAMATH FALLS – Klamath Community College and Oregon Tech are celebrating a new partnership designed to help students complete degrees at both institutions, while saving thousands in tuition. The new program, called Badger to Owl Connection, allows qualifying KCC graduates to receive tuition waivers for two terms at Oregon Tech.

According to KCC President Dr. Roberto Gutierrez, Badger to Owl Connection promotes college access, affordability, and bachelor’s degree completion for more students.

“The student support and financial incentives this new program provides means more access to higher education in our local community than ever before,” Gutierrez said.

“It’s an opportunity too good to pass up.” Students who want to take advantage of Badger to Owl Connection must complete an associate degree at KCC and plan to transfer to Oregon Tech to earn a bachelor’s degree.

“Oregon Tech is committed to our partnership with KCC to make higher education more accessible and affordable for Klamath Basin residents,” said Oregon Tech President Dr. Nagi Naganathan.

“Our long-term partnership makes it possible for students to begin their college career at KCC and then pursue a bachelor’s degree at Oregon Tech, in a cost-effective way that meets students’ goals.”

KCC graduates participating in the Badger to Owl Connection must have a minimum 3.0 GPA to qualify for the tuition waivers. The waivers will be applied to first and last term tuition, up to 15 credits each. The first Badger to Owl cohort begins fall 2019.

The deadline to apply for fall term enrollment at Oregon Tech is March 1. Students who transfer to KCC from other community colleges can qualify for Badger to Owl Connection. Participating students may also utilize KCC scholarships, Oregon Promise, and KCC’s 15 to Finish, which covers the cost of three credits for students taking 15 or more credits.

Once at Oregon Tech, students can apply for other scholarships, along with the Badger to Owl first and last term waivers, to help pay for a bachelor’s degree. For more information or to complete a Badger to Owl Connection application and a personal success plan, call KCC at 541-882-3521 or Oregon Tech at 541-885-1000, or visit the institutions’ websites.

 

 

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2019

    KLAMATH BASIN WEATHER

TODAY
Morning snow of 2 inches or more, then flurries at times throughout the day, high near 32.    Tonight, snow showers likely, mainly before 10pm, low around 16 degrees. New snow accumulation of less than a half inch.

Thursday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 31 Overnight low around 12.

Friday
Mostly sunny, with a high near 34.  Overnight, snow flurries, less than one inch of new snow.

Saturday
Snow likely. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 36. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible, with an overnight low around 24.

Sunday
A chance of snow showers. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 35.

  See Road Views:   Lake of the Woods    Doak Mtn.   Hiwy 97 at Chemult
Hiwy 140 at  Bly       Hiwy 97 at GreenSprings Dr.            Hiway 97 at LaPine


TODAY’S KLAMATH BASIN HEADLINES

Army veteran returns to Klamath to lead irrigation district

Klamath Irrigation District manager Gene Souza started at the district earlier this month following a 30-year career with the U.S. Army.  KID Board President Ty Kliewer told the H&N in January that they were looking for an individual who could responsibly, ethically and diligently move the district forward, with a bent toward attention to detail.

“Gene is a phenomenally talented individual with a long commitment to service of both the public and his country,” Kliewer said. “I am very excited at what he’s going to bring to the district.”

Total transient room tax collection increases

According to Klamath County Tax Collector Rick Vaughn’s numbers, overall yearly amount of Klamath County transient room tax dollars has steadily increased since 2016 — which may indicate an increase in overall tourism.

Vaughn said the 8 percent tax on temporary residential facilities like hotels and Airbnbs goes toward tourism and growth promotion in Klamath County.

Merkley to hold town hall in Klamath, Lake counties Saturday

U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley will hold town halls in Klamath and Lake counties on Saturday.   The Klamath County Town Hall will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at Oregon Institute of Technology in the Mazama-Scott Room of the College Union, followed by the Lake County Town Hall at 4 p.m.

Saturday at the Paisley Community Center at 705 Chewaucan St., in Paisley.

 
   …For complete details on these and other stories see todays Herald & News.  Wynne Broadcasting and the Herald and News…stronger together to keep you informed.
 
 

KCC and Oregon Tech launch Badger to Owl Connection

KLAMATH FALLS – Klamath Community College and Oregon Tech are celebrating a new partnership designed to help students complete degrees at both institutions, while saving thousands in tuition. The new program, called Badger to Owl Connection, allows qualifying KCC graduates to receive tuition waivers for two terms at Oregon Tech.

According to KCC President Dr. Roberto Gutierrez, Badger to Owl Connection promotes college access, affordability, and bachelor’s degree completion for more students.

“The student support and financial incentives this new program provides means more access to higher education in our local community than ever before,” Gutierrez said.

“It’s an opportunity too good to pass up.” Students who want to take advantage of Badger to Owl Connection must complete an associate degree at KCC and plan to transfer to Oregon Tech to earn a bachelor’s degree.

“Oregon Tech is committed to our partnership with KCC to make higher education more accessible and affordable for Klamath Basin residents,” said Oregon Tech President Dr. Nagi Naganathan.

“Our long-term partnership makes it possible for students to begin their college career at KCC and then pursue a bachelor’s degree at Oregon Tech, in a cost-effective way that meets students’ goals.”

KCC graduates participating in the Badger to Owl Connection must have a minimum 3.0 GPA to qualify for the tuition waivers. The waivers will be applied to first and last term tuition, up to 15 credits each. The first Badger to Owl cohort begins fall 2019.

The deadline to apply for fall term enrollment at Oregon Tech is March 1. Students who transfer to KCC from other community colleges can qualify for Badger to Owl Connection. Participating students may also utilize KCC scholarships, Oregon Promise, and KCC’s 15 to Finish, which covers the cost of three credits for students taking 15 or more credits.

Once at Oregon Tech, students can apply for other scholarships, along with the Badger to Owl first and last term waivers, to help pay for a bachelor’s degree. For more information or to complete a Badger to Owl Connection application and a personal success plan, call KCC at 541-882-3521 or Oregon Tech at 541-885-1000, or visit the institutions’ websites.

Healthcare and Pizza Entrepreneurs Slated at Feb. 27 IDEA Talk

The Klamath IDEA (Inspire Development, Energize Acceleration) will host an IDEA Talk on Wednesday, Feb. 27, from 5:30 to 8 p.m. at MC’s on Main.

This month’s Big IDEA feature is Steve Morris, a healthcare entrepreneur from Hood River, Ore.

Morris is the founder and CEO of Inspiring Healthcare Resources, a group of hospice care providers. The group includes Inspiring Hospice Partners of Georgia, Heart of Hospice in Hood River, and High Desert Hospice in Klamath Falls.

“It will be great to continue our 2018-2019 season with a medical-field entrepreneur like Steve. He has a heart for service and inspiration, and strongly believes in the power of entrepreneurship,” said Ben Blanchard, entrepreneur concierge with Klamath IDEA.

Morris completed doctoral studies in biomedical science at the University of Missouri and was led to hospice early in his career through the mentorship of his first CEO, who was passionate about providing outstanding hospice care and inspired Morris with the same passion.

“Hospice is about providing the ultimate holistic care at a unique time in our patients’ lives. It has become my life’s mission to make sure those who deserve hospice care, receive,” Morris said.

Morris has run programs all over the United States since 2006, when he co-founded his first hospice program in the Atlanta, Ga., area. From there, he went on to own, operate, and consult for hospices in South Carolina, Tennessee, and most recently, Oregon, Washington, and Georgia. He has become a nationally-known authority on hospice regulatory compliance.

This month’s IDEA Talk will also include a local company update showcasing an existing business. David and Nell Scott will share the story of Rodeos Pizza and Saladeria, founded by the Scotts in 2014. David created and manages every aspect of Rodeos – from the logo, menu and kitchen design, to hiring, promotion, and bookkeeping.

“Rodeos has become an important presence downtown in the last few years. I’m excited for the Scotts to share their entrepreneurial journey with the community,” said Klamath IDEA Director Kat Rutledge.

Klamath IDEA is committed to creating a thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem to increase opportunities for wealth and prosperity in South Central Oregon. Klamath IDEA is a community initiative made up of organizations, events, and individuals cooperating for a common purpose: entrepreneur-based economic development.

The 2018-2019 IDEA Talks season has been generously sponsored by the Klamath Community College Small Business Development Center, Craft 3, Coldwell Banker Holman Premier Realty, and Klamath County. IDEA Talks are also supported in part by Oregon lottery funds, which are administered by the Oregon Business Development Department (Business Oregon).

IDEA Talks are monthly gatherings designed as a networking opportunity for those with an entrepreneurial mindset interested in learning, connecting, and being inspired. Each gathering features one or more guest speakers discussing an inspirational or educational entrepreneurial=related topic. IDEA Talks bring together entrepreneurs of all ages, founders, business owners, innovators, and support organizations under one roof to hear about and discuss opportunities, need, and great ideas for starting a business, expanding a business, or getting support in the process.

MC’s on Main is located at 617 Main St. in downtown Klamath Falls. Appetizers prepared by MC’s on Main and a non-alcoholic beverage ticket are included in the cost of entry. A no-host bar will be available. Networking begins at 5:30 p.m. and the presentations start at 6 p.m. Those interested in attending this event can purchase discounted tickets in advance online at Eventbrite.com or on Klamath IDEA’s Facebook page for $15. Tickets will also be available at the door for $20 (cash only).

Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2019

Latest Storms Surge Snowpack Levels in Oregon

It began as a very dry water year in October, but the recent string of storms to strike the Pacific Northwest has left much of Oregon at near-normal snowpack levels.

The latest snow/precipitation report issued by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, a wing of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, places Klamath County at 96 percent of average median snowpack for this time of year after the most recent storms, a 15 percent increase over conditions one week ago.

TID Pumping Water To Lower Klamath Refuge

Recent precipitation in the Tule Lake Basin has prompted the Tulelake Irrigation District to begin water deliveries ranging from 6,000 to 10,000 acre feet or more to the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge.

Turning on TID’s D Plant pumping station at this time of year is an indicator of more moisture, district manager Brad Kirby told the Herald and News on Monday afternoon, but not a guaranteed answer to an uncertain water year.

“We’re currently in a wetter-type scenario,” Kirby said, “but because of timing, because of our lack of carry over and lack of ability to store water, that doesn’t always mean that it’s going to be okay.”

City Roads, Sidewalk Expert Weighs in on Klamath Development

During his latest visit, city planning expert Dan Burden called Klamath Falls one of his favorite communities in the U.S.   Burden, who consults with Blue Zones Project and has visited more than 3,200 cities across the country, was in town in January for a special built environments workshop with city officials.

The town continues to struggle with everything from workforce housing placements to food insecurity concerns.  But with enough work and planning, Burden says this could change as he believes more could look to move to the area.

Reality TV, Local Mill Come to “Homestead’s Rescue”

A Discovery Channel episode of “Homestead Rescue” to be aired Wednesday features a July visit by the show’s film crew to Klamath County.

The crew spent one week at Mike and April Kondash’s Sprague River area home and helped them — with assistance from Klamath Falls’s Cook Woods — with improvements to their off-grid ranch.

Must Read

Klamath Basin News, Friday, Feb. 23 – Winter Fest On Ice is Saturday at Bill Collier Ice Arena; Red Tie Masquerade Ball Scholarship Fundraiser is Saturday Night at Ross Ragland Theater; Oregonians Strongly In Favor of Tougher Penalties For Drug Possession With Fentanyl Overdoses Soaring In State

Brian Casey

Second Chance Summit Provides Insight for Welcoming Former Inmates into the Workforce.

Brian Casey

Klamath Basin News, Thursday, 11/12 – Major Rain & Snow Storm Coming Tomorrow to the Northwest

Brian Casey