Oregon Coronavirus Update and Preparedness; Latest News & Information Here

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Updated Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Oregon reports 65 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 159, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 65 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 4,399. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (7), Deschutes (1), Douglas (1), Hood River (6), Jackson (1), Jefferson (1), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (13), Polk (1), Umatilla (2), Wasco (2), Washington (5), Yamhill (4).

Oregon’s 158th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old male in Clackamas County, who tested positive on May 21 and died on June 2 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 159th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old male in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 17 and died on May 30 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Notes:

  • Due to data reconciliation, one case originally reported as hospitalized in the 40–49 age group was determined not to have been hospitalized.
  • One case previously reported in Josephine County was determined not to be a case; the county case count has been adjusted to reflect this.

OHA Posts Weekly Report; Now Includes Active Workplace Outbreaks

OHA today released its COVID-19 Weekly Report, which includes data about the pandemic in Oregon. This week’s report shows increased testing and a continued low percentage positive rate (1.9 percent).

Of note in today’s report is the inclusion of COVID-19 outbreaks in workplaces of more than 30 employees with five or more reported cases. This is being done to keep the public fully informed about COVID-19 in the community.

The number of cases cited in a workplace outbreak will include cases among employees as well as cases among close contacts of employee cases, such as family members, customers and visitors. An active outbreak means that fewer than 28 days have passed since the onset of the most recent case. State and local health officials work intensively with workplaces to help them take steps that protect the health and safety of workers and the public.

Identification of an outbreak in a workplace does not imply a general risk either to all the employees there, or to the customers. When an outbreak is reported or discovered, public health officials investigate to determine who has been exposed and notify those persons directly. Such persons are generally quarantined for 14 days following exposure.

In the June 10 Weekly Report, past COVID-19 outbreaks – those considered closed – will be published. OHA is in the process of compiling those data.

Oregonians encouraged to “Answer the Call” to stop the spread of COVID-19

As Oregon begins to reopen, one key strategy to help stop the spread of COVID-19 is contact tracing. Contact tracers call people who may have been exposed to someone who tested positive for COVID-19 to provide them with guidance and support and help prevent further spread of the virus. OHA is working closely with local public and Tribal health departments on a statewide coordinated contact tracing effort.

To demystify the process of contact tracing, OHA has developed a webpage with downloadable resources, videos and social media cards. Oregonians can learn more about who will get a contact tracing call, what happens on a contact tracing call and how their privacy will be protected.

If you get a call from a contact tracer, we encourage you to answer the call. Together, we can stop the spread of COVID-19.

Go to: healthoregon.org/contacttracing or healthoregon.org/rastreodecontacto to learn more and download resources.

Tuesday, June 2

Oregon reports 33 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 157, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 33 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 4,335. The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (1), Hood River (4), Lincoln (2), Linn (1), Marion (8), Multnomah (10), Umatilla (1), Wasco (2), Washington (4).

Oregon’s 155th COVID-19 death is a 36-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on May 31 and died the same day at Adventist Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 156th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 1 and died on May 22 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 157th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on April 6 and died on May 26 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Outbreak Reported at Bob’s Red Mill

An outbreak of 13 COVID-19 cases has been reported at Bob’s Red Mill in Clackamas County. State and county public health officials are working to investigate the outbreak and protect the health of workers. The outbreak investigation started on May 27.

The risk to the general public from this outbreak is low. If you have questions or concerns about your risk of exposure, please contact your health care provider.

Additional information about this outbreak will be added to the COVID-19 Weekly Report published tomorrow.

Last week, OHA announced that it will begin reporting large COVID-19 outbreaks in workplaces. This will include all past and future outbreaks that involve five or more COVID-19 cases in a workplace setting. OHA is in the process of compiling information on past outbreaks for public disclosure.

OHA is now including a link to the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race and ethnicity.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Monday, June 1

Oregon reports 59 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 154, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 59 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 4,302.

The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (5), Deschutes (2), Jackson (1), Jefferson (11), Josephine (1), Lane (4), Lincoln (3), Linn (2), Marion (13), Morrow (1), Multnomah (6), Polk (2), Umatilla (4), Washington (4).

Oregon’s 154th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on May 29 and died the same day at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Last week, OHA previously announced that it will begin reporting large COVID-19 outbreaks in workplaces. This will include all past and future outbreaks that involve five or more COVID-19 cases in a workplace setting. OHA is in the process of compiling information on past outbreaks for public disclosure.

OHA is now including a link to the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race and ethnicity.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Sunday, May 31

OREGON REPORTS 58 NEW CONFIRMED AND PRESUMPTIVE COVID-19 CASES, NO NEW DEATHS

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 153, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 58 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 4,243.

The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Deschutes (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (1), Jefferson (3), Lane (4), Marion (11), Multnomah (23), Wasco (1), Washington (5), Yamhill (1).

The Oregon Health Authority is now including a link to the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race and ethnicity.

OHA last week announced that it will begin reporting large COVID-19 outbreaks in workplaces. This will include all past and future outbreaks that involve five or more cases in a workplace setting. OHA is in the process of compiling information on past outbreaks.

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Saturday, May 30

OREGON REPORTS 55 NEW CONFIRMED AND PRESUMPTIVE COVID-19 CASES, 2 NEW DEATHS

COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 153, the Oregon Health Authority reported as of 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 55 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 4,185.

The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Hood River (2), Jefferson (2), Klamath (2), Lane (1), Marion (7), Multnomah (21), Umatilla (2), Wasco (1), Washington (12).

Notes due to data reconciliation:

  • One case previously reported in Morrow County was determined not to be a case; the county case count has been adjusted to reflect this.

Oregon’s 152nd COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man in Lane County, who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 4; the location of death is awaiting confirmation. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 153rd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Polk County, who tested positive on May 2 and died on May 28 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Clarification: The investigation into the COVID-19 outbreak at Duckwall Fruit in Hood River County began May 28. The date was incorrectly reported in yesterday’s daily media release.

OHA previously announced that it will begin reporting large COVID-19 outbreaks in workplaces. This will include all past and future outbreaks that involve five or more COVID-19 cases in a workplace setting. OHA is in the process of compiling information on past outbreaks.

The Oregon Health Authority is now including a link to the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race and ethnicity.

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Friday, May 29

Oregon reports 48 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 151, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 48 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 4,131. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Curry (1), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Jefferson (3), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Lincoln (2), Marion (11), Multnomah (18), Wasco (1), Washington (7).

Notes due to data reconciliation:

  • Two cases previously reported in Josephine County were determined not to be cases; the county case count has been appropriately adjusted.
  • One case previously reported in Malheur County was determined not to be a case; the county case count has been appropriately adjusted.
  • One case originally reported in the 70-79 age group was determined not to be a case.
  • One case in the 60-69 age group originally reported to be hospitalized was determined not to have been hospitalized.

Oregon’s 151st COVID-19 death, which was reported Thursday without details, is a 72-year-old man in Polk County who tested positive on May 1 and died May 25 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

An outbreak of six COVID-19 cases has been connected to Duckwall Fruit in Hood River County. The investigation started today, May 29. State and county public health officials are working with the business to address the outbreak and protect the health of workers.

The risk to the general public is considered low. If you have questions or concerns about your risk of exposure, please contact your health care provider. Additional information for this outbreak will be added to the COVID-19 Weekly Report published Wednesday, June 3.

Weekly report indicates steady testing, fewer positive cases

Today OHA released its Weekly Testing Summary, which showed that in the week ending May 29, 17,447 tests were performed in Oregon, with 304 positive results, for a positive rate of 1.7 percent.

The state’s weekly testing capacity remains at 37,702. Meanwhile, Oregon’s cumulative positive testing rate is 3.3 percent of tests performed, which is considerably lower than the national average of 12 percent.

Oregon’s decreasing weekly test positivity rate reflects fewer numbers of individuals with COVID-19 due to physical distancing and other preventive measures, as well as increasing testing statewide.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

OHA modeling report shows steady testing, reduced transmission

Today, OHA released an update to its modeling report  produced jointly with the Institute for Disease Modeling. The new model simulations suggest that there have been approximately 20,000 cumulative infections in Oregon by May 22, of which about 4,000 have been diagnosed based on the local epidemiologic data.

The model continues to show that the “aggressive interventions in Oregon have been effective in dramatically reducing transmission rates.”

But the report also cautions that while hospitalization data suggest that infections have continued to decline in recent weeks, this trend may change as Oregon counties begin phased re-opening. The report further notes that moderate increases in transmission levels in the community could cause a much larger increase in infections.

For example, under the scenario with interventions reducing transmission by 50 percent (versus 70 percent), the model projects about 3,000 more cumulative infections, 155 additional infections per day, and four more new severe cases per day by July 3. The modeling will be updated again in two weeks.

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials report three new cases of COVID-19 in the community, bringing the total to 44. 

Of the 44 cases, 36 have recovered. There are eight active cases in Klamath County. As of May 28, 3,377 Klamath County tests had been processed by laboratories.

Thursday, May 28

COVID-19 resources for people with disabilities

Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services has published a page of ASL coronavirus resources.

The page includes:

  • Links to ASL videos about COVID-19
  • Communication resources
  • Emergency resources (e.g., food, housing)
  • Mental health and resources for emotional well-being

More resources for people with disabilities are available at www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus under “Community Resources for Specific Groups.”

Both sites feature communication cards, including a new one designed to help people who are deaf and hard of hearing communicate about COVID-19 symptoms. The card includes graphics about symptoms and duration and is intended for someone who is deaf or hard of hearing to use to communicate when they think it’s most appropriate.

The card was adapted from a tool created by the state of Wisconsin.

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Virtual ‘Walk Your Way’ event for mental health awareness

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. NAMI typically hosts annual walk events, but in light of COVID-19, it has moved activities online and designated May 30 as a “National Day of Hope.” Our partners at Oregon NAMI are encouraging everyone to register, form a team and participate virtually. To join in the virtual Walk Your Way event, visit their website. You can also follow NAMI on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.

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Public feedback sought on State Health Improvement Plan strategies

OHA, working with more than 100 community partners, is launching the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan as a tool for Oregon’s recovery from COVID-19. The plan outlines strategies needed to address disparities made worse by the health crisis.

The prioritized disparities include:

  • Institutional bias
  • Adversity, trauma and toxic stress
  • Behavioral health
  • Equitable access to preventive care
  • Key economic drivers of public health such as housing, transportation and providing a living wage

The COVID-19 pandemic has worsened the short- and long-term trajectory in each of these five priority areas, making implementation of the plan even more critical. OHA remains on track to launch the 2020-2024 SHIP this August. 

The public is invited to help inform strategies through online surveys in English and Spanish or by providing written feedback. More information about the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan can be found here.

Oregon reports 49 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 151, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 49 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 4,086. The cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Deschutes (1), Jefferson (1), Malheur (5), Marion (11), Multnomah (10), Umatilla (2), Wasco (1), Washington (12), Yamhill (2).

Seven of the new total cases are related to the Townsend Farms outbreak.

Note: Due to data reconciliation, the Lincoln County case count decreased by one. A confirmed case had been counted twice.

Oregon’s 149th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on May 8 and died on May 16 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 150th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on May 6 and died on May 26 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 151st COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive on May 1. Additional information about his death is still pending. An update will be provided when we receive additional information.

The Oregon Health Authority is now including a link to the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race and ethnicity.

Public feedback sought on State Health Improvement Plan strategies

OHA, working with more than 100 community partners, is launching the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan as a tool for Oregon’s recovery from COVID-19. The plan outlines strategies needed to address disparities made worse by the health crisis.

The prioritized disparities include:

  • Institutional bias
  • Adversity, trauma and toxic stress
  • Behavioral health
  • Equitable access to preventive care
  • Key economic drivers of public health such as housing, transportation and providing a living wage

The COVID-19 pandemic has worsened the short- and long-term trajectory in each of these five priority areas, making implementation of the plan even more critical. OHA remains on track to launch the 2020-2024 SHIP this August.

The public is invited to help inform strategies through online surveys in English and Spanish or by providing written feedbackMore information about the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan can be found here.

Wednesday, May 27

Oregon reports 71 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, no new deaths

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 148, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 71 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 4,038.

The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Hood River (1), Jackson (5), Lake (2), Lincoln (2), Marion (6), Multnomah (41), Polk (2), Wasco (2), Washington (5), Yamhill (1).

OHA investigating COVID-19 increase

OHA and local county health authorities are investigating an increase in COVID-19 cases tied to an outbreak at specific locations of a business that operates in the Tri-county region and the Willamette Valley. At this time, there is no indication that the outbreak at these locations poses any significant risk to surrounding communities.

The situation remains under investigation as health officials gather more information. OHA expects more positive test results to be included in the state’s case totals over the next few days as test results are completed. More details about the outbreak, including location information, will be made available in coming days.

Weekly Report Notes Continued Increase in Testing, Decrease in Positive Cases

OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Report was released today, showing that OHA recorded 289 new cases of COVID-19 infection last week, a 26 percent drop from the previous week, while tests reported rose by five percent to 17,214. The percentage of those tests which came back positive fell to 1.7 percent. Percentage positive is a key indicator that epidemiologists track in understanding the spread of the disease. The lower the percentage positive the better. Regrettably, deaths rose by 10 last week, to 148 people (0.3 deaths per 10,000 Oregonians) since the beginning of the outbreak.

New this week in the Weekly Report is a breakdown of where Oregonians are hospitalized with COVID-19. The data, which are based on voluntary hospital reporting, show hospitals with 10 or more cases with specific numbers while hospitals with fewer than 10 hospitalized COVID-19 patients are listed without specific numbers.

Also of note: The COVID-19 Weekly Report has changed the publication day from Tuesdays to Wednesdays, starting today.

Daily Update now included in the daily new cases releases

OHA is now including a link to the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily new cases news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race, and ethnicity.

Tuesday, May 26

Staying safe and strong as Oregon reopens

Although our state is gradually beginning to reopen, the health advice to keep you and your loved ones safe is still important. Stay home if you are sick. Practice physical distancing by keeping six feet apart from each other. Wash your hands frequently throughout the day and disinfect high-touch areas. Try to avoid touching your face.

These continue to be important actions you can take to stay safe and strong. You should also wear a face covering or mask while you are in public and shared spaces. At work, business owners and managers must make sure you can keep physical distance from your coworkers and support good hygiene if they want to reopen.

OHA’s Safe + Strong website continues to be updated regularly with everyday tips and resources that you can use as we continue to navigate how address COVID-19 in our communities.

And our COVID-19 website continues to add guidance for the public and businesses as we begin the process of reopening.

Thank you for doing your part to stop the spread of COVID-19 and keep our communities safe.

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New Downloadable Data Tables and Visualizations Available

The Oregon Health Authority has released two new data dashboards, which will be posted on OHA’s COVID-19 website alongside the original Oregon COVID-19 Case and Testing Counts Statewide dashboard.

One of these dashboards will present information on testing and case outcomes at the county level, replicating in downloadable form data presently available on the OHA website. The other new dashboard will present statewide data on COVID-19 case demographics, hospitalizations and deaths, also replicating data available on the OHA website but including data that had been available only in the OHA COVID-19 Weekly Report.  

For more information about these data updates, see OHA’s press release.

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Oregon reports 18 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 1 new presumptive case, 0 new deaths

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 148, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 18 new confirmed cases and one new presumptive case of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 3,967. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Crook (1), Marion (5), Multnomah (7), Washington (3), Yamhill (1).

Notes:

  • Due to data reconciliation, one presumptive case in Josephine County had updated information and their case status was changed to not a case to reflect the new information.
  • Due to data reconciliation, one case originally reported in the 30-39 age group and one case originally reported in the 70-79 age group were determined not to be cases.

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Monday, May 25

Oregon reports 19 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 4 new presumptive cases, 0 new deaths

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 148, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 19 new confirmed cases and 4 new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 3,949. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Deschutes (1), Jackson (3), Josephine (1), Marion (4), Multnomah (5), Umatilla (1), Washington (5).

Notes:

  • Due to data reconciliation, 1 presumptive case had updated information and their case status was changed to not a case to reflect the new information.
  • A case originally reported as a Linn County case was later determined to be a Marion County case. The case count in Marion county includes the case to reflect this change. However, the case that moved from Linn County to Marion county is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide for today.

COVID-19 Weekly Report publication day changed: The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report will be released on Wednesdays, starting Wednesday May 27.

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Sunday, May 24

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 148 as of 12:01 a.m. today, the Oregon Health Authority reported.

Oregon Health Authority reported 43 new confirmed cases and 3 new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,927. The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Crook (2), Deschutes (6), Jackson (2), Lincoln (1), Linn (4), Marion (7), Multnomah (3), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (17), Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 148th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 23 and died on May 10 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Notes:

  • Due to data reconciliation, one case originally reported as presumptive was determined not to be a case.
  • Due to data reconciliation, one case originally reported as hospitalized in the 50–59 age group and one case originally reported as hospitalized in the 60–69 age group were determined not to have been hospitalized.

Oregon Health Authority is now including a link to the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race and ethnicity.

Note: The COVID-19 weekly report will now be published on Wednesdays, rather than on Tuesdays, starting May 27.

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Saturday, May 23

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged and remains at 147 as of 12:01 a.m. today, the Oregon Health Authority reported today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 28 new confirmed cases and seven new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,888. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Clatsop (1), Crook (3), Deschutes (2), Jackson (1), Jefferson (1), Lane (1), Marion (10), Multnomah (4), Umatilla (2), Wallowa (1), Washington (6), Yamhill (1).

Notes:

  • The cutoff for data has changed to 12:01 a.m., which means the reporting period for this report was 16 hours. Subsequent reports will have the same data cutoff, so the reporting period will return to 24 hours.
  • Due to data reconciliation, three confirmed cases, one each originally reported in Jackson, Multnomah, and Washington counties, were determined not to be cases. They were subtracted from Friday’s state total, and the total number of cases in each county was reduced to reflect this change.
  • Due to data reconciliation, 10 presumptive cases had updated information and their case status was changed to reflect the new information.
  • Due to data reconciliation, one case originally reported in the 10–19 age group and one case originally reported in the 70–79 age group were determined not to be cases.

Oregon Health Authority is now including a link to the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race and ethnicity.

Note: The COVID-19 weekly report will now be published on Wednesdays, rather than on Tuesdays, starting May 27.

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Friday, May 22

Oregon reports 45 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 3 new presumptive cases, 2 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 147, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 45 new confirmed cases and three new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 3,864. The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (5), Clatsop (2), Curry (1), Jackson (3), Linn (2), Malheur (4), Marion (8), Multnomah (11), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (10).

Oregon’s 146th COVID-19 death is a 53-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on May 18 and died May 20, at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 147th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 25 and died May 8, at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Note: Due to data reconciliation, one presumptive case had updated information and their case status was changed to reflect the new information.

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Thursday, May 21

Oregon reports 24 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 0 new presumptive cases, 1 new death

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 145, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 24 new confirmed cases and no new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,817. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Coos (1), Deschutes (1), Jefferson (1), Malheur (3), Marion (4), Multnomah (8), Umatilla (3), Washington (3).

Oregon’s 145th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Polk County, who tested positive on May 2 and died on May 20 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Note: Due to data reconciliation, two confirmed cases originally reported in Josephine County were determined not to be cases. They were subtracted from Wednesday’s state total, and the total number of cases in Josephine County went down to reflect this change.

Eight presumptive cases also were updated and their case status was changed to reflect the new information (five suspect, three confirmed).

Today, OHA will provide a Public Health Indicators Dashboard to enable communities across Oregon to monitor COVID-19 in the state.

The dashboard, which will be updated weekly on Thursdays, provides a transparent report that presents complex epidemiological data in an interactive, easy-to-understand way.

The dashboard displays three key indicators:

  • COVID-19 disease
  • Severe COVID-19 burden
  • Active Monitoring Capacity

All are key to monitoring the progress of the “stop, watch and redirect” process for determining progress in the phased reopening of the state. The indicators include emergency room visits, hospitalizations and active monitoring.

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Tuesday, May 19

Rent relief available

If you are lacking resources due to loss of income and are at risk of homelessness, Oregon Housing and Community Services’ COVID-19 Rent Relief Program may be able to help.

OHCS has allocated $8.5 million through a needs-based formula to regional Community Action Agencies (CAAs). The formula weighed severe rent burden data, poverty data, homelessness data and unemployment claims.

CAAs will begin taking applications in the coming days. Oregonians in need should contact their local CAA directly. Tenant income loss documentation and other materials are required to access this program. Rent payments will be made directly to the landlord on behalf of the tenant.

The $8.5 million was allocated by the Oregon Legislature through the Joint Emergency Board. OHCS anticipates additional resources from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act will be made available in the weeks ahead.

The funds were allocated statewide to local communities. See the Governor’s blog for the full list and contact information

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OHA Releases Weekly Report on COVID-19 in Oregon

Today, OHA released its COVID-19 Weekly Report, showing the data trends for the pandemic in our state. New this week is a table (figure 3) that shows the distribution of the number of days it takes a person with COVID-19 to report recovery from their illness. Also, OHA is adding the cumulative presumptive cases to the weekly report and will stop reporting out the new presumptive cases daily.

Next week, we will distribute the Weekly Report on Wednesday because of the Memorial Day holiday on Monday.

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Oregon reports 33 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 8 new presumptive cases, 2 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 140, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 33 new confirmed cases and 8 new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,726. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Curry (1), Deschutes (6), Jackson (1), Marion (12), Multnomah (9), Umatilla (3), Washington (6), Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 139th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old woman in Umatilla County, who tested positive on May 4 and died on May 16 at Good Shepard Health Care System. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 140th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on April 7 and died on May 17 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Notes:

  • Due to data reconciliation, two cases originally reported in Clackamas County were determined not to be cases. They were subtracted from Monday’s state total.
  • Due to data reconciliation, one case originally reported in the 80 and over age group was determined not to be a case.

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Monday, May 18

Oregon reports 62 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 2 new presumptive cases, 1 new death

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 138, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 62 new confirmed cases and two new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,687. The new confirmed and presumptive cases are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (5), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (5), Jackson (1), Lane (1), Malheur (2), Marion (16), Multnomah (12), Umatilla (5), Union (1), Washington (10), Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 138th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on May 16 and died the same day at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

OHA is now including the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race, and ethnicity.

Free COVID-19 testing offered in Chiloquin and Bonanza

Klamath Health Partnership offers free COVID-19 testing in Chiloquin, Bonanza

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. – In an effort to ensure access to COVID-19 testing throughout Klamath County, Klamath Health Partnership is offering free testing in Chiloquin and Bonanza.

Walk-up and drive through testing will be offered 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday, May 21, at the Chiloquin Fire Hall.

Testing in Bonanza will be 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 27, on Main Street next to Big Springs Park.

Participants will be asked to complete some paperwork before being given the nasal swab test.

This service is made possible through a collaboration between Klamath County Public Health and Klamath Health Partnership.

“The first two testing days were held in Merrill and Malin, with a good response,” said Klamath County Public Health Director Jennifer Little. “Public Health serves the entire county and it is important to meet people where they are. Time and transportation can be barriers to service. This project takes testing to the people.”

Klamath Health Partnership is providing the testing, facilitated through Public Health’s relationships with the smaller towns’ governments and citizens.

 “A lot is said about the social determinants of health, which include where we live and our access to services, including health care,” said Klamath Health Partnership CEO Signe Porter. “Klamath Health Partnership exists to help local people receive the care they need and deserve.”

Klamath Health Partnership COO Amanda Blodgett explained that the testing is part of the requirements for Klamath County to reopen. “Greater access to testing was an element of the framework that allowed Governor Brown to see we have a plan in place to safely reopen the county. Hopefully, this is just the beginning of an effort to make testing more accessible countywide.”

For any tests that return a positive result, Klamath County Public Health will follow-up with the individual to provide direction for isolation and symptom monitoring.

Sunday, May 17

OREGON REPORTS 9 NEW CONFIRMED COVID-19 CASES, 3 NEW PRESUMPTIVE CASES, NO NEW DEATHS

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 137, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported nine new confirmed cases and three new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 3,623. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Deschutes (1), Douglas (1), Lincoln (1), Marion (3), Multnomah (5), Polk (1).

Due to data reconciliation, a confirmed case in Clackamas county was determined not to be a case. The number of cases between 40-49 was reduced by one as a result of this change.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

OHA is now including the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update in the daily news release. The Daily Update is a detailed look at COVID-19 in Oregon, including testing data, hospital capacity, and cases broken down by demographic information such as age groups, gender, race and ethnicity.

Saturday, May 16

OREGON REPORTS 64 NEW CONFIRMED COVID-19 CASES, 7 NEW PRESUMPTIVE CASES, NO NEW DEATHS

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 137, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 64 new confirmed cases and seven new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,612. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (1), Lane (3), Linn (1), Malheur (2), Marion (27), Multnomah (22), Umatilla (2), Wasco (2), Washington (8), Yamhill (2).

Note: Due to four positive lab results, four presumptive cases are now considered confirmed cases, but they do not impact the confirmed case counts in today’s statewide total. These cases have been added as new confirmed cases in the list of new cases by county.

During routine data reconciliation, confirmed cases originally reported in the following counties – Baker (2), Douglas (1), and Wallowa (1) – were determined not to be cases. They were subtracted from Friday’s state total, and the total number of cases in each county was reduced to reflect this change.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Friday, May 15

Oregon reports 63 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 1 new presumptive case, no new deaths

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 137, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 63 new confirmed cases and one new presumptive case of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,541. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (1), Clackamas (6), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Lincoln (1), Linn (2), Malheur (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (17), Polk (1), Umatilla (3), Union (1), Wallowa (1), Washington (4).

Note: Due to positive lab reports, two cases are now considered confirmed. These cases are not reported as confirmed in the list of new cases by county.

Oregon’s 133rd COVID-19 death was previously reported as having died on May 12. The date of death was later determined to be May 11.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Modeling shows reduction in transmission rates

Revised modeling from the Institute for Disease Modeling, prepared for OHA, shows that measures taken by Oregonians have lowered transmission rates, with the number of new cases appearing to be at a steady, low number, rather than declining. Read the full report here.

Thursday, May 14

31 counties approved to begin reopening

Governor Kate Brown announced the counties that can begin entering Phase I of reopening on May 15 under her framework for building a safe and strong Oregon. Thirty-one counties have demonstrated they meet all of Oregon’s safety and preparedness criteria for reopening, as well as a declining prevalence of COVID-19.

Thirty-three counties applied to reopen on May 15. This morning Governor Brown announced 28 counties had been approved, and three additional counties were approved in the afternoon. Three Portland Metro-area counties did not apply to reopen. The applications for Marion and Polk counties were not approved, and those counties will be monitored for seven days to see if conditions in those counties have improved.

You can view the reopening status of your county, as well as sector-specific guidance documents with more information about the reopening process, at coronavirus.oregon.gov.

For more information, read the governor’s press release or watch the video of Governor Brown’s press conference (English/Spanish).

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New online tool launched to support veterans and their families

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs has developed a new online tool to help guide veterans and their families in recovery in the wake of the economic crisis caused by COVID-19 and to inform them of any changes to their earned benefits. The Veteran Resource Navigator is designed to assist veterans from all walks of life in finding the federal, state and local resources that are most needed for their unique circumstances in 2020.

This tool includes resources that are organized by topic, including Economic, Health, Education, Housing and Food, and other resources. The new online Veteran Resource Navigator is available on ODVA’s website now at www.oregon.gov/odva. Veterans can also access additional assistance, by calling an ODVA Veteran Resource Navigator at 800-692-9666.

Veterans Resource Navigator banner
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Oregon reports 67 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, no new presumptive cases, 3 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 137, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 67 new confirmed cases and no new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,479. The new confirmed cases reported today are in the following counties: Deschutes (2), Linn (2), Malheur (1), Marion (33), Multnomah (19), Polk (1), Umatilla (2), Washington (2), Yamhill (5).

Oregon’s 135th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 11 and died May 13 at Kaiser Permanente Westside Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 136th COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 22 and died May 12 at Oregon Health & Science University. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 137th COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on March 29 and died May 4 at Providence St Vincent’s Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Note: During routine data reconciliation, the following changes were identified:

  • Due to positive tests, eight cases are now recategorized as confirmed cases.
  • It was determined that a new case reported in Josephine County on May 12 should have been reported on May 6.
  • A confirmed case originally reported as a Clackamas County case was later determined not to be a case. It was subtracted from Wednesday’s state total, and the total number of cases in Clackamas County was reduced by one to reflect this change.
  • A presumptive case originally reported as a Multnomah County case was later determined not to be a case. It was subtracted from Wednesday’s state total, and the total number of cases in Multnomah County was reduced by one to reflect this change.
  • A case that was recorded as transferred out of Coos County was indeed a Coos County case.

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Wednesday, May 13

“When our health care system was preparing for the worst of this, volunteer health care workers answered the call,” said Governor Brown. “I want to commend all our health care professionals and volunteers for their incredible work protecting the lives, safety, and wellness of Oregonians during this crisis.”

Health care professionals needed as SERV-OR volunteers to support COVID-19 response

The Oregon Health Authority is amplifying efforts to recruit health care professionals to join the State Emergency Registry of Volunteers in Oregon (SERV-OR) as Governor Kate Brown advances plans for safely reopening Oregon.

Since March SERV-OR has added more than 800 new volunteers, strengthening OHA’s ability to contain COVID-19 cases and building the capacity of the volunteer program to respond to future emergencies.

Duties of SERV-OR volunteers are as varied as they are vital, from supporting medical casualty triage and behavioral health services to staffing medical shelters and information hotlines. OHA is planning for volunteers to be a critical part of the state’s COVID-19 recovery effort by supporting contact tracing, testing, community wellness campaigns, as well as studies of long-term community effects and mass vaccination programs. Those signing up in the coming days will have the opportunity to train and deploy quickly.

If you are a health care professional, please consider registering to volunteer with SERV-OR at SERV-OR.org. SERV-OR volunteers include licensed physicians, nurses, pharmacists, emergency medical technicians (EMTs), behavioral health providers, respiratory therapists and other medical professionals.

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OHA announces first case of COVID-19-linked pediatric condition

Oregon Health Authority has learned of the state’s first case of pediatric multi-system inflammatory syndrome, a rare but emerging condition in children that is believed to be associated with COVID-19 infection. The case is a girl who had confirmed COVID-19. She is being treated at Randall Children’s Hospital at Legacy Emanuel in Portland.

Little is known about the syndrome, although it’s believed to be rare. Boston Children’s Hospital, citing a recent health alert out of the United Kingdom, noted symptoms that include fever, inflammation, and poor function in one or more organs. It is reportedly similar to Kawasaki disease, which causes fever, rash, swelling of hands and feet, redness of the eyes, swollen lymph glands, and inflammation of the mouth, lips and throat.

For more information, read OHA’s press release.

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Protecting your health if you have chronic kidney disease

We’ve heard that many of you are interested in learning more about why certain underlying conditions can lead to complications from COVID-19. The graphic below shares information about why chronic kidney disease puts people at a greater risk for severe illness from COVID-19 and how you can protect your health.

Kidney disease social card
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Oregon reports 55 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 4 new presumptive cases, 4 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 134, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 55 new confirmed cases and four new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,416. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Clatsop (3), Columbia (1), Coos (1), Hood River (1), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (23), Multnomah (13), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (13).

Note: During routine data reconciliation, a presumptive case originally reported as a Deschutes County case was later determined not to be a case. It was subtracted from Tuesday’s state total, and the number of cases in Deschutes County was reduced by one to reflect this change.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 131st COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive on May 2 and died May 8 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 132nd COVID-19 death is a 100-year-old woman in Polk County, who tested positive on May 2 and died May 11 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 133rd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Polk County, who tested positive on May 1 and died May 12 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 134th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on May 11 and died May 12 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Tuesday, May 12

Oregon reports 61 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 11 new presumptive cases, 0 new deaths

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 130, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 61 new confirmed cases and 11 new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 3,358. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (6), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (4), Jackson (1), Josephine (1), Klamath (1), Linn (1), Marion (29), Multnomah (9), Polk (2), Wasco (1), Washington (14), Yamhill (1).

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Monday, May 11

Staying safe as Oregon begins slowly lifting the #StayHomeSaveLives orders

As Governor Brown starts slowly lifting restrictions on activities and businesses, it’s important to remember that health and hygiene advice that slows the spread of COVID-19 still applies. Actions such as frequent handwashing, staying six feet apart, and wearing face coverings will continue to be a part of our daily lives. Share the social graphic below to help remind the important people in your life how to stay safe as we continue to navigate the next steps of the COVID-19 response together.

Staying safe as Oregon Reopens

Western States Pact Urges Federal Support for States and Cities Responding to COVID-19 Pandemic

In a letter to Congressional leadership today, governors and legislative leaders from five Western states requested $1 trillion in direct and flexible relief to states and local governments in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic in order to avoid deep cuts to services like public health, public safety, public education and help people get back to work.

To read the letter, see Governor Brown’s press release.

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OHA to host webinars to support behavioral health consumers in Oregon

The Oregon Health Authority’s Behavioral Health Office of Consumer Activities is hosting webinars for behavioral health consumers and their families every Tuesday from 3:30 to 4:15 p.m. This is a chance to hear updates from OHA about COVID-19 and behavioral health and ask any questions. Upcoming topics include “Telehealth Tips and How To’s” on May 12 and an update from the Child and Family Behavioral Health team May 19. Registration is required and limited to 1,000 participants. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Please register here to attend.

Oregon reports 51 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 7 new presumptive cases, 3 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 130, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

OHA reported 51 new confirmed cases and 7 new presumptive cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 3,286. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (2), Clatsop (4), Klamath (1), Linn (1), Marion (17), Multnomah (14), Polk (3), Washington (14).

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 128th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive on May 2 and died on May 10 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 129th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Umatilla County, who tested positive on April 29 and died on May 9 at Providence St. Mary Medical Center, Walla Walla. It is unknown at this time if he had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 130th COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on May 3 and died on May 9 at OHSU Hillsboro Medical Center. She had no known underlying medical conditions.

Note: The number of hospitalizations in the 10-19 age group dropped by one. During routine data reconciliation, a person was determined not to have been hospitalized during their COVID-19 illness.

Oregon’s 120th COVID-19 death was previously reported incorrectly. The 120th death is a 58-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on May 3 and died on May 8 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Sunday, May 10

Oregon reports 60 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 8 new presumptive cases, 0 new deaths

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 127, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 60 new confirmed cases and eight new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 3,228. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (10), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Marion (14), Multnomah (22), Polk (2), Umatilla (1), Washington (11), Yamhill (2).

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Saturday, May 9

Oregon reports 79 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 13 new presumptive cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 127, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 79 new confirmed cases and 13 new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 3,160. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (6), Clatsop (1), Coos (1), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Jefferson (2), Lane (1), Linn (2), Malheur (1), Marion (37), Multnomah (24), Polk (2), Umatilla (4), Washington (6), Yamhill (2).

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 125th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 8 and died on May 8 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 126th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on April 19 and died on May 2 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 127th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Polk County, who tested positive on May 1 and died on May 7 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Note: The number of hospitalizations in the 30–39 age group dropped by one. During routine data reconciliation, a person was determined not to have been hospitalized during their COVID-19 illness.

Friday, May 8

Oregon reports 75 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 5 new presumptive cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 124, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 75 new confirmed cases and five new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 3,068. The new confirmed cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (9), Clatsop (9), Deschutes (1), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marion (13), Morrow (1), Multnomah (30), Polk (2), Umatilla (3), Wasco (1), Washington (8).

Note: During routine data reconciliation, a presumptive case originally reported as a Benton County case was later determined not to be a case. It was subtracted from Thursday’s state total, and the total number of cases in Benton County went down by one to reflect this change.

Also, the number of hospitalizations in the 10-19 age group dropped by one. During routine data reconciliation, a person was determined not to have been hospitalized during their COVID-19 illness.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 122nd COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on May 3 and died May 6 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 123rd COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on April 21 and died May 6 at Santiam Memorial Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 124th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 23 and died May 5 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Thursday, May 7

“Today, thanks to millions of Oregonians following the strict physical distancing orders I put in place, I am happy to say these sacrifices have prevented as many as 70,000 COVID-19 infections, and 1,500 hospitalizations in Oregon,” said Governor Brown. “We are on track in meeting the goals that doctors and public health experts have laid out for us. And that means we now have the opportunity to begin rebuilding a safe and strong Oregon.”

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Governor Brown announces new details of plans for reopening Oregon

Governor Kate Brown shared new details of her framework for rebuilding a safe and strong Oregon, including new guidance for counties and businesses on a phased reopening process. Governor Brown emphasized that by taking steps gradually and carefully, and following science and data, Oregon can begin to reopen safely.

The new guidance on reopening calls for the widespread use of face coverings, maintaining physical distance of six feet between individuals as much as possible, and following good hygiene and disinfection practices.

The Governor also announced that large gatherings such as conventions, festivals, and major concerts and live audience sporting events will need to be cancelled at least through September. Restarting events of this size will require a reliable treatment or prevention, like a vaccine, which is many months off. Further guidance on large events will be provided in the coming months.

Next week, updated safety guidelines regarding transit, certain childcare, summer school, and summer camps and youth programs will be issued.

You can read more details in the governor’s press release or watch today’s press conference.

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Understanding the health signs we must see to reopen Oregon

Oregon will use a careful, step-by-step process to safely reopen our state based on clear public health criteria and signs our health care system is able to respond to a spike in new infections. Some counties will be eligible to begin limited reopening of additional business sectors as early as May 15 if they demonstrate they have met all requirements for reopening. These requirements include:

  • See fewer Oregonians getting sick from COVID-19 or have fewer than 5 hospitalizations 
  • Have sufficient COVID-19 testing and contact tracing capability
  • Establish plans for supporting the isolation and quarantine of people who are sick from COVID-19
  • Have the hospital capacity to handle any surge in COVID-19 cases
  • Have enough safety equipment for health care workers

You can read more about the Three Health Signs We Must See to Reopen Oregon on OHA’s website and share the social card below.

When will it be safe for Oregon to reopen?
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What will happen on May 15?

Beginning May 15, retail stores that were previously closed but can follow physical distancing guidelines can begin reopening.

Childcare, summer school, camps and youth programs can also begin reopening. Counties that meet all of the health criteria will be eligible to enter “Phase I,” pending approval by the Governor after recommendations from the Oregon Health Authority. In Phase I, counties can begin the limited reopening of the following sectors under specific safety guidelines:

  • Restaurants and bars for sit-down service
  • Personal care and services businesses, including barbers and salons
  • In-person gatherings of up to 25 people
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Oregon reports 70 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 3 new presumptive cases, 6 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 121, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 70 new confirmed cases and three new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,989. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (4), Clackamas (6), Clatsop (1), Coos (1), Deschutes (2), Jefferson (4), Marion (21), Morrow (1), Multnomah (16), Polk (3), Washington (11), Yamhill (3).

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 116th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 28 and died on May 6 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 117th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 16 and died on May 5 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 118th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on April 22 and died on May 3 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 119th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 22 and died on May 5 at Portland VA Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 120th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 23 and died on May 5 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 121st COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Polk County, who tested positive on May 2 and died on May 5 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Note: The number of hospitalizations in the 20-29, 30-39, and 40-49 age groups each dropped by one. During routine data reconciliation, these people were determined not to have been hospitalized during their COVID-19 illness.

Wednesday, May 6

Families are eligible for financial support to replace meals children usually get at school

With children at home due to COVID-19, many families are struggling to replace meals that would have usually been provided at school. To support them, the Department of Human Services (DHS) and the Oregon Department of Education (ODE) announced that children eligible for free or reduced-price meals will get cash benefits for the meals they would have received at school.

This policy change will benefit more than 351,000 students receiving free or reduced-price school meals in Oregon. This includes nearly 147,000 students already receiving Nutrition Assistance. Households will receive $5.70 per child for each normal school day for the months of March, April, May, and June. This is the equivalent of one lunch and one breakfast.

Families who have experienced significant income loss may now be eligible for free or reduced-price school meals. There is still time to apply. Apply online or contact your local school.

DHS will continue to work with federal partners to provide help to Oregonians in need. To apply for Nutrition Assistance, visit needfood.oregon.gov or call 2-1-1.

Read the full details here.

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Do you need help paying your electric bill?

If you need help paying your electric bill, check out the Oregon Energy Fund. It provides funds for energy assistance to more than 30 partner agencies and nonprofits in Oregon. Visit the website and enter your county or zip code to find out who has energy assistance in your area and how to contact them. (Note that the office does not provide direct assistance but connects people in need with available local resources.)

Oregon reports 70 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, 7 new presumptive cases, 2 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 115, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 70 new confirmed cases and seven new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,916. The new confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (1), Clackamas (4), Columbia (1), Deschutes (1), Jefferson (4), Lane (2), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (24), Polk (7), Umatilla (4), Wasco (1), Washington (6), Yamhill (1).

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 114th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 30 and died on May 2 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 115th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive on April 27 and died on May 4 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Note: The number of deaths in the 60-69 age group has dropped by one. During routine data reconciliation, the person’s date of birth was updated. This person has been re-categorized to be in the 80 and over age group.

Tuesday, May 5

A note from Lillian Shirley, Director of Oregon State Public Health, on the addition of ZIP code data to OHA’s Weekly Report

In this week’s Weekly Report, OHA has added COVID-19 case data by ZIP code and county. OHA is taking steps to protect patients’ privacy by combining data. If a ZIP code’s population is less than 1,000, we will combine ZIP codes and report the aggregate case count. Also, if there are fewer than 10 cases in a ZIP code, then we will be reporting “1-9.”

The goal of releasing the data is to help people better understand the extent of community-based spread of the virus. We are committed to being transparent and accountable to all the communities we serve, especially those hardest hit by the pandemic. 

OHA wants to acknowledge the degree to which data, particularly by zip code, may contribute to or reinforce stigma and discrimination in communities of color and underserved neighborhoods. We know from earlier analysis that communities of color in Oregon have been disproportionately impacted by the virus.

OHA’s Health Equity definition states, “Achieving health equity requires the ongoing collaboration of all regions and sectors of the state, including tribal governments to address: (1) The equitable distribution or redistribution of resources and power; and (2) Recognizing, reconciling, and rectifying historical and contemporary injustices.”

Inequities in OHA’s data are likely to reflect the inequitable distribution of power and resources among Oregon communities. OHA believes by sharing this data, we can identify and continue conversations with affected communities for how to redistribute resources and power to rectify injustice. We are committed to helping the public better understand “why” the impact of the disease is shouldered more by certain communities.

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Governor Brown announces limited opening of state recreational areas

Governor Kate Brown announced the limited opening of some state parks, outdoor recreation facilities, and areas across Oregon for day use, effective today. Camping opportunities will become available as federal, state, local, and private providers are able to prepare their facilities for visitors. Ski resorts also will be able to resume activities under a new executive order that will be released soon. As this limited reopening occurs, it is essential that Oregonians recreate responsibly to protect the health, wellness, and safety of themselves and others in local communities.

Reopening outdoor recreation areas will be a phased approach as it becomes safe. Columbia River Gorge parks and recreation areas, as well as coastal areas that are not yet ready to welcome visitors back, will remain closed for now, while the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department coordinates with local jurisdictions and partners in Washington to determine the appropriate timing for reopening.

More information and tips on how to stay safe while recreating can be found in the Governor’s press release.

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Protecting your health if you have diabetes

OHA continues to release additional data about risk factors for COVID-19 and underlying health conditions. We’ve heard that many of you are interested in learning more about why certain underlying conditions can lead to complications from COVID-19. The graphic below shares information about why diabetes puts people at a greater risk for severe illness from COVID-19 and how you can protect your health.

Diabetes and COVID-19 Protecting Your Health

Oregon reports 72 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, eight new presumptive cases, four new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 113, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 72 new confirmed cases and eight new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,839. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (5), Clatsop (9), Coos (1), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Josephine (2), Linn (1), Marion (13), Morrow (1), Multnomah (15), Polk (19), Umatilla (3), Washington (5), Yamhill (1).

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 110th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 14 and died on May 2 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 111th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 7 and died on May 2 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 112th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 24 and died on May 2 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 113th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on April 13 and died on May 3 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. He had no known underlying medical conditions.


COVID-19 cases to be listed by ZIP code

Starting today, OHA will begin posting COVID-19 case data by ZIP code and by county. This will provide a more granular, community-level look at the disease trends in Oregon.

To protect privacy, if a ZIP code’s population is less than 1,000, the ZIP codes will be combined and reported in the aggregate case count. And if there are fewer than 10 cases in a ZIP code it will be listed as “1-9.”

You can view the weekly report here.

Downloadable file: 2020-0178_Oregon_COVID-19_Daily_Update__035_050520_FINAL.pdf

Today the State Emergency Coordination Center (ECC) in Salem, distributed the Oregon COVID-19 Daily Update. This attached report provides a summary of combined information from the State ECC and Oregon Health Authority Agency Operations Center. The document details COVID-19 cases in Oregon, hospital capacity and PPE supply inventory. It also offers a summary from each of the state’s 18 emergency support functions.

This report was previously distributed by OHA.

Monday, May 4

OHA now including “presumptive cases” in daily reporting

Starting today, OHA will begin tracking presumptive COVID-19 cases in its daily reports, consistent with recently amended guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A presumptive case is someone who does not have a positive PCR test — a “Polymerase Chain Reaction” that confirms if a person has COVID-19 — but is showing symptoms and has had close contact with a confirmed case. If they later test positive, they will be recategorized as a confirmed case.

The number of new presumptive cases will be reported alongside the number of confirmed cases. Clinical and demographic characteristics for confirmed and presumptive cases will be included together in the daily report. We will report out the total number of deaths among confirmed and presumptive cases.

A presumptive case is investigated by local public health authorities in the same way they would a confirmed case. Presumptive cases are asked to follow the same self-isolation protocol as confirmed cases. In rare instances, a presumptive case will later be diagnosed with another disease that better explains their illness. In those instances, the presumptive COVID-19 case will be recategorized, and they will no longer be reported as a COVID-19 case.

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Housing protections for Oregon tenants during COVID-19

Many Oregonians have experienced job loss, loss of wages or business closure because of COVID-19. To support keeping people in their homes, Governor Kate Brown issued an executive order on March 22, 2020, which places a temporary hold on law enforcement actions relating to residential evictions for not paying rent. If you have questions about what this means, the Oregon Law Center and Legal Aid Services of Oregon have developed a video to help explain what you need to know as a tenant.

You can find additional information about tenant protections on the OregonLawHelp.org webpage. If you need housing resources due to impacts resulting from COVID-19, visit 211info.org or call 2-1-1.

Housing protections for Oregon tenants during COVID-19
#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Oregon reports 65 confirmed COVID-19 cases, 14 presumptive cases, no deaths

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 remains unchanged from yesterday and remains at 109, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 65 new confirmed cases and 14 new presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,759. The new COVID-19 confirmed and presumptive cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (4), Clackamas (1), Clatsop (1), Coos (2), Deschutes (1), Hood River (1), Jefferson (1), Lane (1), Linn (10), Marion (17), Multnomah (15), Polk (8), Umatilla (6), Washington (10), Yamhill (1).

Note: The state is now including presumptive COVID-19 cases in its daily reports, consistent with recently amended guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A presumptive case is someone who does not have a positive PCR test — a “Polymerase Chain Reaction” that confirms if a person has COVID-19 — but is showing symptoms and has had close contact with a confirmed case. If they later test positive by PCR, those will be recategorized as confirmed cases.

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Sunday, May 3

Sunday Coronavirus Update changes

We want to remind you that starting today, we will be sending a shorter version of the Coronavirus Update on Sundays. We’ll just be sharing Oregon’s daily information on COVID-19 cases. If there is breaking news, we will include that as well. We will still be delivering a full set of content Monday through Saturday. Thanks for understanding this adjustment.

The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from yesterday and remains at 109, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 45 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 2,680. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Coos (4), Hood River (2), Josephine (1), Malheur (1), Marion (21), Multnomah (5), Umatilla (3), Washington (7).

To see more case and county-level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Saturday, May 2

COVID-19 has claimed five more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 109, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 57 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 2,635. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Deschutes (2), Hood River (1), Jefferson (3), Lane (4), Malheur (2), Marion (15), Morrow (1), Multnomah (14), Umatilla (4), Washington (9).

Note: During routine data reconciliation, a case originally reported as a Polk County case was later determined not to be a case. It was subtracted from Friday’s state total, and the total number of cases in Polk County was reduced by one to reflect this change.

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 105th COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man from Polk County, who tested positive on March 19 and died on May 1 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 106th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man from Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 20 and died on May 1 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 107th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man from Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 27 and died on May 1 at Providence Milwaukie Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 108th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman from Marion County, who tested positive on April 22 and died on April 30 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 109th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman from Umatilla County, who tested positive on April 14 and died on April 30 at Kadlec Regional Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Friday, May 1

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 104, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 69 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 2,579. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (8), Clatsop (1), Coos (1), Douglas (1), Josephine (1), Klamath (1), Linn (1), Malheur (2), Marion (17), Morrow (2), Multnomah (13), Polk (3), Umatilla (7), Washington (9).

To see more case and county level data, please visit the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 104th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 14 and died April 29 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Modeling shows reduced transmission of COIV-19

Today OHA released its statewide modeling update showing that our statewide mitigation efforts are working to flatten the curve.

This week’s report also modeled three scenarios from May 4 until June 4, assuming interventions with different levels of effectiveness in reducing transmission. The comparison shows this epidemic is clearly very sensitive to changes in policies or public adherence to community mitigation strategies.

The scenario modeling underscores the need to continue monitoring outcomes extremely carefully over time. It shows that to loosen the community mitigation strategies without a large increase in infections, changes need be made incrementally. And that any changes need to be accompanied by other interventions to keep transmission levels low. Other interventions include increased testing capacity, detailed contact tracing and likely the quarantining of infected individuals. Read the full weekly modeling update here.

Oregon to start tracking presumptive cases

Starting today, OHA will begin tracking presumptive COVID-19 cases in its daily reports, consistent with recently amended guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A presumptive case is someone who does not have a positive PCR, a test that confirm if a person has COVID-19 but is showing symptoms, and had close contact with a confirmed case. If they later test positive by PCR, those will be recategorized as confirmed cases.

The first results of that revised tracking will be reported in the daily report starting Monday, May 4.

The number of new presumptive cases will be reported alongside the number of confirmed cases. Clinical and demographic characteristics for confirmed and presumptive cases will be included together in the daily report. We will report out the total number of deaths among confirmed and presumptive cases.

Absent a positive PCR test result, the case will remain a presumptive case. A presumptive case is investigated by local public health authorities as they would a confirmed case. Presumptive cases are asked to follow the same self-isolation protocol as confirmed cases.

In rare instances, a presumptive case will later be diagnosed with another disease that better explains their illness. In those instances, the presumptive COVID-19 case will be recategorized and they will no longer be reported as a COVID-19 case.

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and public health officials unveiled new details Friday of the state’s plan to beef up testing and contact tracing as businesses look to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic.

State officials are trying to balance the desire to restart the economy against the threat of more deaths, suggesting that risks can be managed by adding 600 people to perform public health investigations and ensuring 15,000 Oregonians can be tested for the virus each week.

Dr. Dean Sidelinger, the state health officer and epidemiologist, said he’s confident the plan will allow Oregon businesses to gradually reopen while preventing a dramatic surge in coronavirus infections. Some rural counties could begin reopening by mid-May, he said, but expanded contact tracing must begin first.

“We’re not going to be able to prevent every case,” he told The Oregonian/OregonLive ahead of a planned 10:30 a.m. news conference Friday. “And I think we will see cases increase as people start to move about more.

“But we feel this is a plan where we can best manage that and try to keep the increase in cases to a minimum.”

Oregon has not seen a high rate of coronavirus infections compared to the rest of the nation, identifying about 2,500 Oregonians with the virus through limited testing. Yet officials are taking a more cautious approach to reopening than in some other states, such as Georgia, which began easing stay-home restrictions last week. Some Oregonians, particularly in rural areas with the fewest number of cases, are pressing to reopen businesses and resume some semblance of daily life.

But new modeling shows that easing restrictions runs the risk of sharply increasing coronavirus infections in Oregon. The modeling suggests that Brown’s March stay-home order reduced infections by about 70 percent from what it could have been – and doing anything different creates uncertainty.

“The problem is, we’re a little hampered in knowing exactly how much decrease in transmission we can do with these measures,” Sidelinger said.

If restrictions reduced infections by only 60 percent, Oregon might see only modest increases in active infections and deaths, the modeling suggests. “At 60 percent, we can manage the increase,” Sidelinger said.

But at 50 percent, active infections could jump quickly and a greater number of deaths could ultimately follow, the modeling suggests.

“If we can only decrease disease by about 50 percent from baseline, the curve does rise rather steeply,” Sidelinger said.

Sidelinger said the modeling, used for planning, suggests that Oregon can reopen safely while officials aggressively monitor infections and hospitalizations to determine if coronavirus spreads too rapidly.

“I’m confident that we can keep it at 60 percent,” he said. “And if we’re seeing increases, then we will roll out easing of measures.”

Documents released Friday provided new details about how Oregon hopes to contain the spread of coronavirus through testing and contact tracing. State officials have said they want to have the ability to test 15,000 Oregonians a week, and now the underlying assumptions behind that number are becoming clearer.

The state has assumed that at any given time 2,800 Oregonians are infected with the virus. Dividing that number by eight days, the assumption for how long each person is infectious, the state believes 350 people are infected each day.

The state wants to have testing capacity so each new infection could ensure the testing of five people. That would require a total of 1,750 a day, or 12,250 a week, according to the state. Officials also want to perform targeted testing for outbreaks and broader surveillance, taking the total to 15,000.

No state is conducting widespread testing because of limitations in supplies. But Oregon’s plan would allow for testing of less than 0.5% of the population each week, below the level many experts say is needed.

State officials on Friday also broadened their guidance about testing to include new symptoms previously announced by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Oregon Health Authority this week had previously declined to answer questions from the newsroom about whether its testing guidance would be expanded.

The new guidance recommends testing for people in high-risk groups with symptoms that include fever, cough or shortness of breath, or two of the following: fever, chills, repeated shaking with chills, muscle pain, headache, sore throat, or new loss of taste or smell.

“We’re making the medical decision to really recommending more” testing, Sidelinger said. “Because we believe we have the capacity there.”

State officials also provided new but limited details on their plan to ensure 600 more people are hired to perform contact tracing. Tracers would talk with infected Oregonians, identifying who they could have infected and notifying those people to stay home to prevent spread.

The health authority said Oregon has at least 100 tracers now. Officials plan to add 600 more workers for tracing based on a projections of 15 workers for every 100,000 residents.

But national health organizations have said that ratio should be a baseline, and during this pandemic it should be twice as high. That would suggest an appropriate number of more than 1,300 tracers in Oregon.

Asked whether 600 new tracers is sufficient, Sidelinger said: “This is where we’re going to start. We’ll continue to evaluate to see how we’re doing.”

Tracers would be hired over the next month or so. Each tracer would be responsible for contacting 15 people at any given time, Sidelinger said, noting that many of them may be new to public health investigations.

“We want to keep their workload manageable,” he said, adding: “We’ll see if that’s the right assumption or if we need to change that.”

Thursday, April 30

Understanding why some underlying health conditions lead to COVID-19 complications

OHA continues to release additional data about risk factors for COVID-19 and underlying health conditions. We’ve heard that many of you are interested in learning more about why certain underlying conditions that can lead to complications from COVID-19. The graphic below shares information about why heart conditions put people at a greater risk for severe illness from COVID-19 and how you can protect your health.

Heart conditions and COVID-19: Protecting Your Health
#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Should I trust a call, text, or email saying I could get financial help?

There have been reports that scammers are pretending to be the government, contacting people by robocall, text message, email, and other outreach. These scammers say they can get people’s financial help during the COVID-19 pandemic, and then ask for money or personal information, like your Social Security, bank account, or credit card number. This is a scam.

Don’t trust anyone who offers financial help and then asks for money or personal information. Federal and local disaster workers do not solicit or accept money. The Department of Homeland Security, FEMA, U.S. Health and Human Services, and the Centers for Disease Control staff never charge for disaster assistance.

The Federal Trade Commission scams page has tips to help you avoid scams online, on the phone, by text, and through email. If you see a scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission: ftc.gov/complaint.

Klamath County

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials report two new cases of COVID-19 in the community, bringing the total to 39. The total includes eight active cases and 31 recoveries. Laboratories have processed 2,038 tests for Klamath County.

People needing to seek medical care beyond COVID-19 concerns are encouraged to do so. Throughout the state and nation people with ongoing medical concerns have expressed hesitation to access care. Most local clinics are using telemedicine options whenever possible. Patients are urged to call ahead to their clinic to receive direction from staff members before arriving.

It is important that community members continue to stay home, practice social or physical distancing of six feet, disinfect surfaces, and frequently wash their hands. These actions will prevent further spread.

Because the outer wall of the coronavirus is made of fat, hand washing with soap and water is the best way to destroy the virus.

KCPH has added a new page at http://www.klamathcounty.org/1076/Klamath-County-data to provide a more visual approach to Klamath County COVID-19 data.

State of Oregon

COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 103, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 64 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,510. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (8), Coos (5), Deschutes (1), Klamath (1), Linn (4), Malheur (1), Marion (17), Multnomah (11), Umatilla (5), Washington (10).

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 102nd COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive April 7 and died on April 26 at Legacy Emanuel Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 103rd COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive April 25 and died on April 25 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Wednesday, April 29

Resilience tips from Oregon Health & Science University Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellows

Remember, children follow the lead of their parents. They look to you to see if they should be afraid, concerned, confident, calm or carefree. You can set the stage for their response to be concerned and confident by taking a moment to check in with yourself before you check in with them.

Consistency and structure can help establish a sense of normalcy and be calming.

  • Try to establish a simple routine for your family in 60- or 90-minute chunks.
  • Get your children involved in the planning process to give them a sense of control.

Physical activity has been shown to combat symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Relearn how to be present with your family.

  • Being present and available for your family can be the best way to support and help during this stressful time.
  • Consider working on tasks or projects alongside your children and set aside time to offer your family your full and undivided attention.

Maintain technologic well-being.

  • The key to healthy screen use is awareness and open conversations with your children.
  • Consume news judiciously from reputable journalism organizations, the Oregon Health Authority or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
  • Participate in technology alongside your children, for example by engaging with them via social media apps or video games they frequently use.
#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Oregon Health Plan enrollments starting to rise

The Oregon Health Plan (OHP) provides free physical, dental and behavioral health coverage to Oregonians who qualify. Preliminary numbers from OHP are starting to show an uptick in new member enrollments. Applications for OHP averaged 776 per day in March and April compared with 536 per day in January and February.

Taking care of your physical and mental health, especially at this time, is critically important. If you’ve recently had a change in income, you may be eligible for OHP. If you’re applying for OHP right now, we want to remind you:

  • People are not required to verify income (submit a pay stub) with their application.
  • Federal stimulus payments and increased unemployment payments will not affect OHP eligibility. They will not be counted during the application process or when members report a change in their household.

We encourage individuals to see if they are eligible for the Oregon Health Plan. For more information about applying for OHP, go to OHP.Oregon.gov.

Emergency payments from the government will not change your OHP eligibility

COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 101, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 61 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,446. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Hood River (1), Jefferson (4), Linn (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (19), Polk (1), Umatilla (8), Washington (7), Yamhill (1).

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 100th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 20th and died on April 22nd at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 101st COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 11th and died on April 20th at Adventist Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.


Oregon Health Plan applications show increase

Preliminary numbers from the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) are starting to show an uptick in new member enrollments. Applications wfor OHP averaged 776 per day in March and April compared with 536 per day in January and February. Preliminary data for March show that Medicaid enrolled 23,000 new members. This month, Medicaid has enrolled nearly 19,000 new members as of April 24.

“Many Oregonians have lost their jobs and as a result, their health coverage,” said OHA director Patrick Allen. “Taking care of your physical and mental health, especially at this time, is critically important. We encourage individuals to see if they are eligible for the Oregon Health Plan.”

The Oregon Health Authority has made several changes to its Medicaid program to support health care access for Oregonians during the response to COVID-19. These changes include:

  • Individuals can sign up for OHP without having to verify their income (submit a pay stub) with their application. They will be able to self-attest, which will help Oregonians get access to OHP coverage more quickly.
  • Members who are currently enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan will not lose coverage during this crisis. About 20,000 members per month usually exit the program. About half of those are expected to stay enrolled due to this policy change, which took effect March 15.
  • Federal stimulus payments and increased unemployment payments will not affect OHP eligibility. They will not be counted during the application process or when members report a change in their household.

About one in four Oregonians receive health coverage through OHP. As of March 31, more than 996,000 Oregonians were enrolled in OHP, and by April 27, enrollment had grown to nearly 1,016,000.

OHP provides free physical, dental, and behavioral health coverage to Oregonians who qualify. For more information about applying for OHP, go to OHP.Oregon.gov.

Tuesday, April 28

COVID-19 has claimed seven more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 92 to 99, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 31 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,385. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Coos (1), Harney (1), Klamath (1), Linn (2), Marion (9), Morrow (1), Multnomah (13), Umatilla (1), Wasco (1), Yamhill (1).

Note: A case originally reported as a Washington County case was later determined to be a Multnomah County case. The case count in Multnomah county includes the case to reflect this change. However, the case that moved from Washington County to Multnomah County is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide for today.

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 93rd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old female in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 17 and died on April 27 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 94th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 26 at Salem hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 95th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 20 and died on April 25 at Salem hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 96th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 17 and died on April 26 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 97th COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 17 and died on April 23 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 98th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 24 and died on April 26 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 99th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on April 25 and died on April 26 at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Klamath County

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials report a new case of COVID-19 in the community, bringing the total to 37. The total includes 13 active cases and 24 recoveries. Laboratories have processed 1,882 tests for Klamath County.

Klamath County has the highest testing ratio to population in the State of Oregon. Gov. Kate Brown has indicated that expanded testing statewide is necessary to “reopen Oregon.” KCPH is interested in expanding diagnostic testing to identify and isolate current infections to aid in the reopening of the county. Testing within Klamath County is available at Basin Immediate Care, Bonanza Clinic, Klamath Open Door, Klamath Tribal Health, Merrill Clinic, and Sky Lakes Medical Center.

It is important that community members continue to stay home, practice social or physical distancing of six feet, disinfect surfaces, and frequently wash their hands. Now that COVID-19 is in the community, these actions are urgent to prevent further spread.

Because the outer wall of the coronavirus is made of fat, hand washing with soap and water is the best way to destroy the virus.

KCPH has added a new page at  http://www.klamathcounty.org/1076/Klamath-County-data to provide a more visual approach to Klamath County COVID-19 data.

Monday, April 27

Colorado and Nevada Join California, Oregon, and Washington in Western States Pact

Colorado Governor Jared Polis and Nevada Governor Steve Sisolak today announced their states are joining California, Oregon and Washington in the Western States Pact––a working group of Western state governors with a shared vision for modifying stay at home and fighting COVID-19.

For more information, see Governor Brown’s press release.

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

How can I politely tell friends and family that I can’t get together with them in person because I’m following the #StayHomeSaveLives orders?

You’re missing your friends and family, and they’re missing you. If you find it hard to tell friends and family you can’t see them due to physical distancing, here are a few ideas of what to say when someone wants to visit or get together:

  • “I believe it’s important to stay home and keep the virus from spreading.”
  • “In our family we’re keeping a healthy distance from others to help reduce the spread of coronavirus.”
  • “I look forward to seeing you when we can all safely get together again.”
  • “We would love to visit with you over the internet or on the phone.”
#MyORHealth horizontal rule

How to check the status of your federal Economic Impact Payment

Some Oregonians are starting to see the federal Economic Impact Payments deposited directly in their bank accounts. These payments are being automatically issued to eligible 2019 or 2018 federal tax return filers who received a refund using direct deposit. Below are a few commonly asked questions about how to get your Economic Impact Payment.

If you didn’t receive a 2019 or 2018 federal tax refund via direct deposit, how can you get your payment deposited in your bank account?

Use “Get My Payment,” which allows you to provide your banking information on your return so you can receive payments immediately. “Get My Payment” will also allow taxpayers to track the status of your payment. 

If you didn’t file a federal tax return in 2019 or 2018, how can you see if you are eligible and get your payment deposited in your bank account?

If you have not filed a tax return yet for 2018 or 2019 you can file your taxes for free to make sure you are eligible. You can also use the ‘Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info Here’ web portal and enter your bank account information.

Regardless of how you receive your payment, the IRS will send you a mailed letter to the most current address they have on file approximately 15 days after it sends your payment.

For more information about your Economic Impact Payment, please visit IRS.gov and Treasury.gov/CARES.

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 91 to 92, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 43 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,354. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Coos (2), Deschutes (2), Linn (5), Malheur (1), Marion (11), Multnomah (12), Washington (9), Yamhill (1).

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 92nd COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old female in Washington County, who tested positive on April 17th and died on April 25th at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Testing Numbers Rise

OHA received and reported a large number of tests completed on April 20th with a specimen collection date of April 18th. Epidemiologists are working to determine whether there is a true increase in cases, a technical anomaly in reporting dates to be adjusted based on further reporting, or any geographic or another pattern. OHA will continue to monitor case data for a potential explanation.

Sunday, April 26

Busting myths about COVID-19
As we learn more about the virus that causes COVID-19, new information is coming at us fast. Unfortunately, so is misinformation. To combat this, the World Health Organization (WHO) has created a Myth-busters page to address some of the rumors. They continue to add information as new myths surface. For example, a hot bath will relax you, but no, it won’t help fight the coronavirus. Spraying alcohol or chlorine all over your body will not kill viruses that have already entered your body. And, viruses cannot be spread through 5G mobile networks. You can download shareable graphics for your social media accounts to help fight the spread of rumors. FACTchecking infographic#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Legislature invests more than $32M in state funds to support COVID-19 response
On Thursday, the Oregon Legislature’s Emergency Board approved an emergency funding package to provide support to our state’s COVID-19 response. The new funding totals more than $32 million and includes:$12 million for rental assistance and motel vouchers for individuals who have lost income due to COVID-19 and shelter for individuals at risk of infection or health problems due to inadequate shelter or housing.$5 million matched with another $5 million from the Oregon Business Development Department to create a $10 million assistance program for small businesses with up to 25 employees that have not received support from the federal CARES Act.$2 million for survivors of domestic and sexual violence to support emergency housing$10 million to create a wage replacement fund for newly unemployed workers who are unable to access unemployment payments due to their immigration status.$3.35 million to help workers in long-term care facilities pay for coronavirus testing and offer caregivers training in infectious disease prevention. You can view a recording of the Emergency Board meeting online.
#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Reporting income changes to HealthCare.gov
If you’re enrolled in a Marketplace plan through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace and your income or household changes, you should update your application. The “Economic Impact Payment” that will be sent to most families won’t affect people applying for coverage or those who already have coverage through the Marketplace. The federal increase in unemployment benefits of $600 per week for up to four months (ending July 31, 2020) will be counted as income and will need to be reported. Changes — such as lower or higher income, adding or losing household members, or getting offers of other health coverage — may affect the coverage or savings you’re eligible for. You can find steps on how to report changes and important information about Marketplace plans and COVID-19 at HealthCare.gov.dotted line for divider
Oregon reports 58 new COVID-19 cases; 4 new deaths
COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state death toll to 91, the Oregon Health Authority reported as of 8 a.m. today. Oregon Health Authority also reported 58 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 2,311. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (3), Coos (4), Deschutes (2), Jefferson (1), Josephine (1) Linn (3), Marion (4), Multnomah (29), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (7), Yamhill (1).To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.
Oregon’s 88th COVID-19 death is a 51-year-old man in Wasco County, who tested positive on April 19 and died on April 24 at Mid-Columbia Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.
Oregon’s 89th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 12 and died on April 18 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.
Oregon’s 90th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 18 and died on April 25 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.
Oregon’s 91st COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on April 9 and died on April 22 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Saturday, April 25

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 87, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 76 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,253. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (5), Coos (4), Deschutes (1), Jackson (1), Jefferson (3), Linn (4), Marion (15), Multnomah (27), Polk (4), Umatilla (3), Washington (8).

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 87th COVID-19 death is a 59-year-old man in Lane County, who tested positive on April 14 and died on April 23 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at RiverBend in Springfield. He had underlying medical conditions.

Friday, April 24

Oregon reports 51 new COVID-19 cases; 3 new deaths; updated model indicates Stay Home, Save Lives is flattening the curve

COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 86, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 51 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,177. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (5), Lane (2), Marion (20), Multnomah (14), Umatilla (2), Washington (8).

During routine data reconciliation, a case originally reported as a Douglas County case was later determined not to be a case. It was subtracted from Thursday’s state total, and the total number of cases in Douglas County went down by one to reflect this change.

To provide more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 84th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 14 and died April 20 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 85th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 12 and died April 19 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 86th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on March 15 and died April 22 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Updated modeling report shows flattened curve

OHA also released a modeling report update today that indicates the efforts of Oregonians to stay home and practice physical distancing has helped prevent as many as 70,000 COVID-19 cases in Oregon.

“The epidemic would have continued to grow exponentially, doubling every week,” the report states. “By April 16th, the number of cumulative infections would have been about 80,000, including 2,000 hospitalizations. Hence, the interventions are estimated to have averted over 70,000 infections, including over 1,500 hospitalizations (450 instead of 2,000), by April 16th.”

“Our modeling continues to show that our collective efforts are working,” said Dean Sidelinger, MD, state epidemiologist. “And despite the very real hardships these sacrifices have cost Oregonians, we have to keep it up even as we move toward easing restrictions. We need to build on our success in limiting the spread of COVID-19.”

OHA has worked with the Institute for Disease Modeling on the weekly reports, which use Oregon outbreak data with IDM research and modeling techniques to present policy makers with projections for the trajectory of the disease. The models are updated weekly.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Thursday, April 23

We’re on the right path
It’s been one month since Governor Kate Brown’s #StayHomeSaveLives order. By following the executive orders, researchers estimate that together we have prevented as many as 70,000 cases and 1,500 hospitalizations. We know we have asked a lot of Oregonians. Because of the role you have played in this response, Oregon is on the right path to help stop the spread of COVID-19. We will continue to provide you with the information you need to stay safe and healthy as Oregon begins taking steps to lift the orders.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Non-urgent medical procedures to resume May 1 with safeguards in place
Governor Brown today announced that she will lift her order delaying non-urgent procedures for health care providers, as long as they demonstrate they can meet new requirements for COVID-19 safety and preparedness. Hospitals, surgical centers, medical offices, and dental offices that meet requirements will be able to resume non-urgent procedures on May 1. Medical providers must demonstrate the ability to:
Minimize the risk of coronavirus transmission to patients and healthcare workers
Maintain adequate hospital capacity in the event of a surge in COVID-19 cases
Support the health care workforce in safely resuming activities
Facilities ready to begin resuming non-urgent procedures will be required to do so gradually, in order to preserve the capacity to treat COVID-19 patients. For more details, read Governor Brown’s press release or watch a recording of the Governor’s press conference.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Safe + Strong Caring for each other through COVID-19
Governor Brown and OHA launch Safe + Strong outreach campaign in 12 languages
To get through COVID-19 together, all of us need access to information and resources that allow us to be safe, healthy, and strong. This crisis has been particularly challenging for people who already face barriers to health and well-being, including our family, friends, and neighbors who don’t have access to life-saving information in the language they speak. Today, Governor Brown and Oregon Health Authority launched the Safe + Strong campaign. Safe + Strong will support communities in Oregon through partnerships with community organizations and outreach. The campaign includes a website with culturally relevant information in 12 languages and community engagement and technical assistance efforts to support community organizations in reaching and assisting Oregon residents across the state. For more information, see Governor Kate Brown and OHA’s press release and visit safestrongoregon.org.

Oregon reports 68 new COVID-19 cases; 5 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed five more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 83, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 68 new cases of COVID-19 bringing the state total to 2,127. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (8), Coos (1), Deschutes (4), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Klamath (3), Linn (4), Malheur (1), Marion (9), Multnomah (16), Umatilla (1), Wasco (1), Washington (18).

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 79th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 3 and died on April 22 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 80th COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 19 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 81st COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 20 and died on April 22 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 82nd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 9 and died on April 21 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 83rd COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 1 and died on April 21 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Klamath County reports 3 new COVID-19 cases

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials report three new cases of COVID-19 in the community, bringing the total to 36. The total includes 13 active cases and 23 recoveries. In addition to these positive lab results, there have been 1,506 negative tests in Klamath County.

It is important that community members continue to stay home, practice social or physical distancing of six feet, disinfect surfaces, and frequently wash their hands. Now that COVID-19 is in the community, these actions are urgent to prevent further spread.

KCPH has added a new page at http://www.klamathcounty.org/1075/COVID-19-visual-information to provide a more visual approach to topics related to COVID-19.

Klamath County and other Eastern Oregon Counties ask Governor to lift restrictions.

Last week Klamath County along with 13 other Eastern Oregon Counties wrote a letter to the Governor asking to lift COVID-19 restrictions.

Read the letter here

Wednesday, April 22

Support is available for Oregon’s “helpers”
Lines for Life has created a Virtual Wellness Room to offer support to helpers, mental health professionals, first responders, social workers, and anyone considered an essential worker during the COVID-19 pandemic in Oregon. Each check-in call will have a facilitator to guide the conversation.“We at Lines for Life want to thank you for all the work you do to keep our communities safe,” the organization said. “We are offering a place for helpers to exchange stories of hope and areas of need. We especially want to hear what things are coming up for you personally and explore how we can cheer one another on to continue the good work you are already doing. We ultimately want to create space to breathe out stress and breathe in hope.”The meetings are held using Zoom conference calls from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at this link: https://zoom.us/j/4848426773. Please share this invite with anyone in your network of Oregon helpers.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Help keep kids and teens safe online
With schools closed, kids and teens are spending more time at home. They’re likely online more than usual. We want to share a few tips for parents to help keep youth safe online:
Talk to them about online safety. Even if you already have, a reminder won’t hurt.
Monitor what they do online and know their passwords. Maintain an open line of communication.
Get wise about online privacy. Review the privacy settings on social networks and websites that your children frequent and use them to limit who can view their profile.
Minimize the amount of publicly available personal information such as phone numbers, email addresses, where they live, birthdates, and other identifying information. Help your kids understand what information is okay to share and what should never be shared. For more information, here are a few more helpful resources: Oregon Department of EducationOregon Department of JusticeDigital Futures InitiativeBeau Biden FoundationNetSmartz by the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children

Oregon reports 57 new COVID-19 cases; no new deaths

Oregon Health Authority reported 57 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,059. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (10), Coos (1), Deschutes (2), Jefferson (1), Linn (1), Marion (7), Multnomah (24), Washington (10) and Yamhill (1).

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Note: Test reports were received yesterday but due to a technical issue, negative test results were not able to be processed overnight and are being processed today. The number of negatives is classified as “pending” in today’s data table.

Tuesday, April 21

Oregon reports 3 new COVID-19 deaths, 46 new COVID-19 cases; data presents snapshot of COVID-19 in Oregon; new tobacco prevention campaign launches; Spanish Facebook page launches with health content

PORTLAND, Ore.— COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 78, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 46 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 2,002. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Coos (1), Klamath (2), Linn (1), Marion (10), Multnomah (22), Umatilla (2), Wasco (1), and Washington (7).

After receiving updated residency information, Benton and Yamhill Counties both transferred cases to other Oregon counties yesterday. This led to an overall increase of 46 new cases statewide, and an increase of 48 new cases for the counties.

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 76th COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on March 16 and died on April 17 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 77th COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on March 24 and died on April 18 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 78th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive and died on April 20 at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Weekly Report expands data presented to present a snapshot of COVID-19 in Oregon

OHA’s Weekly Coronavirus Report has expanded this week to add data about the number of people who have tested positive for COVID-19 and recovered, along with other additional data.

The report provides demographic data and information on signs and symptoms from all COVID-19 cases in Oregon, the reported risk factors from all COVID-19 cases, COVID-19 cases by sex, age group, race, and ethnicity.

The Weekly Report also includes death totals and rates, and cases and deaths from all care facilities and senior living communities that have three or more confirmed COVID-19 cases or one or more death. You can read the Weekly Report here.

Oregon Health Authority launches new tobacco prevention campaign

As evidence mounts that people who smoke and vape are at higher risk of complications from COVID-19, OHA is launching a new media campaign and website that focuses on actions real people in Oregon are taking to protect the next generation of youth from nicotine addiction.

The Smokefree Oregon campaign and website, www.smokefreeoregon.com, are part of Gov. Kate Brown’s Executive Order 19-09 issued Oct. 4, 2019, which directed state agencies to take strong action to address the vaping public health crisis. It is also relevant in the fight against COVID-19: Initial research shows that people who smoke are twice as likely to develop serious complications from COVID-19 than people who don’t smoke.

Nearly all people who smoke started when they were under 18, underscoring the importance of anti-tobacco media campaigns and other evidence-based prevention programs.

Nicotine addiction among youth is on the rise. Vaping among Oregon 11th-graders increased 80% in just two years, from 13% in 2017 to 23% in 2019, according to the 2019 Oregon Healthy Teens survey. Among Oregon high school students who use e-cigarettes exclusively, the survey also found, nearly 90% use flavored e-cigarette products. OHA’s 2019 Tobacco and Alcohol Retail Assessment Report found that about 20% of tobacco retailers in Oregon display tobacco products within a foot of candy or toys. What’s more, one in five Oregon tobacco retailers illegally sold e-cigarettes to an individual younger than 21 in 2019.

The campaign focuses on revealing tobacco industry marketing to youth and how the industry targets communities that are already stressed or struggling. Widespread evidence shows that tobacco marketing causes youth tobacco use and makes it harder for people who are addicted to nicotine to quit. Smokefree Oregon’s new campaign highlights the role of kid-friendly flavors and intentional tobacco industry advertising at children’s eye level. It also calls out how uneven protections—for example, exempting menthol from the federal flavored cigarette ban—has perpetuated higher rates of tobacco-related disease among people of color.

In the face of relentless tobacco industry marketing, individuals, communities and counties across the state have scored wins to hold the tobacco industry accountable. “It’s crucial, particularly as we battle a respiratory virus that puts tobacco users at risk of severe illness, that we protect the next generation from addiction and lung disease,” says Dean Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed. state health officer and epidemiologist at OHA.

“Local public health departments and tribes have been working tirelessly for years to protect our kids from tobacco addiction, especially communities that have the greatest burden of tobacco-related disease. As we’re seeing play out in the COVID-19 pandemic, some communities are at higher risk, partly because of chronic health conditions caused by tobacco. We need to dig into the drivers of those health disparities, including the role of the tobacco industry.”

On its website, Smokefree Oregon shares examples of how people in Oregon are pushing back on the tobacco industry—like Hood River community member Gerardo Bobadilla, who refused the tobacco industry’s requests to sell vape and cigarette products in his grocery store (Mercado Guadalajara). “I focus on selling people the things they need to put on the table for their families. Tobacco isn’t one of them. I hope I can show other businesses that you can be successful without selling tobacco.”

Ads from the campaign will run on billboards in downtown Portland and Salem, and across the state online and on social media from April 21-June 30, 2020. To join Smokefree Oregon’s efforts to fight the tobacco industry, visit www.smokefreeoregon.com/take-action.

If you need help quitting tobacco, free support and resources are available through the Oregon Tobacco Quit Line:

For services tailored to American Indians and Alaska Natives: Visit https://smokefreeoregon.com/native-quit-line/ or call 1-800-QUIT-NOW and press 7.

OHA launches Spanish Facebook page to better inform all Oregonians

OHA and state partners are working hard to make sure that every Oregonian has access to the latest health and wellness information. To better meet the needs of Spanish speaking Oregonians, OHA has launched a new Facebook page exclusively in Spanish. You can find the new Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ohaespanol.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Monday, April 20

Klamath County reports 3 new COVID-19 cases

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials report three new cases of COVID-19 in the community, bringing the total to 33. The total includes 14 active cases and 19 recoveries. In addition to these positive lab results, there have been 1,349 negative tests in Klamath County.

It is important that community members continue to stay home, practice social or physical distancing of six feet, disinfect surfaces, and frequently wash their hands. Now that COVID-19 is in the community, these actions are urgent to prevent further spread.

For more information and COVID-19 updates, visit publichealth.klamathcounty.org/coronavirus.

10 ways to help your community
While following the #StayHomeSaveLives order continues to be the most important action Oregonians can take to slow the spread of COVID-19, we know many of you are looking for other ways to help. Check out Governor Brown’s website for 10 ways you can volunteer, donate and help your community right now.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Accessing telehealthcare through the Oregon Health Plan
Like other health coverage plans, Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members can get care during the COVID-19 emergency without leaving their homes. Members can make telehealth appointments for medical, mental health, addictions treatment, and dental care. Members should talk to their health care provider about the options. If you’re an OHP member or serve OHP members, help us get the word out about telehealth by sharing this social graphic:Telehealth OHP social card#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Oregon National Guard distributing PPE to long-term care facilities
Today Governor Kate Brown announced that the Oregon National Guard will distribute approximately 395,000 pieces of personal protective equipment (PPE) to all long-term care facilities across Oregon. The rapid distribution of masks, gloves, and face shields will supplement efforts by the Department of Human Services and Oregon Health Authority to support facilities by helping prevent the spread of COVID-19 to residents and staff. The shipments of PPE to Oregon’s long-term care facilities include approximately 177,000 surgical masks, 127,000 gloves, 55,000 N95 masks, 33,000 face shields, and 2,500 gowns. Members of the Oregon National Guard began deliveries of this equipment Saturday. For more information, read the Governor’s press release.

Oregon reports 1 new COVID-19 death, 47 new COVID-19 cases

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 75, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 47 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,956. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (10), Douglas (1), Klamath (1), Lincoln (1), Linn (2), Marion (13), Multnomah (6), Polk (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (9), and Yamhill (1).

A case previously reported in Jackson County was transferred out of state during routine data reconciliation, reducing the cumulative statewide cases by one.

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 75th COVID-19 death is a 45-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 14 and died on April 18 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Sunday, April 19, 2020

OHA adds a weekly testing summary to COVID-19 website
OHA has now added a COVID-19 weekly test summary to its website that provides updates on test results and supplies. OHA continues to provide COVID-19 testing through the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory (OSPHL) while Oregon hospitals continue building their laboratory testing capacity. Several Oregon hospital laboratories and commercial laboratories, such as Quest and LabCorp, provide external testing capacity for the state.OHA is in the process of updating its testing guidance for providers and for OSPHL to augment testing in support of testing goals, including:
Protect health care providers, first responders, and critical infrastructure workers.
Increase access to testing in health care settings to appropriately assess, triage and treat patients.
Identify and control the spread of disease in congregate care settings.
Eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in COVID-19 health outcomes.
Longer-term, testing is a key strategy for understanding the transmission of the virus and the population prevalence of the disease.
As of April 17, Oregon’s positive testing result has remained fairly consistent at about 5% of tests performed; as compared to the national average of 17.6%.OSPHL continues to prioritize its testing to identify and control clusters of disease in congregate care settings, including long-term care and correctional facilities.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
If your work situation has changed, you may qualify for OHP
If you have had a change in your employment, you may qualify for health coverage through the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). OHP is our state’s Medicaid program, offering free health care to anyone who qualifies. Eligibility for OHP is based on monthly income and other requirements. That means you may qualify for OHP now, even if you have been denied in the past. The best way to see if you qualify is to apply. Visit OHP.Oregon.gov for more information. Social card income change OHP#MyORHealth horizontal rule
New resource for families of children and youth with special needs
Many people are feeling anxious about COVID-19. Having children and youth with special health care needs may increase that worry. OHA has worked with the Oregon Center for Children and Youth with Special Health Needs (OCCYSHN) to provide a list of reliable sources so you can get the information that you need to protect the health of your family.
Download “COVID-19 Resources for Families of Children and Youth with Special Health Care Needs” on the OHA website.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 66 new COVID-19 cases
COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 72 to 74, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today. The Oregon Health Authority also reported 66 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,910. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Deschutes (1), Lane (2), Marion (23), Multnomah (21), Umatilla (1), and Washington (12).
A previously reported Klamath County case was determined today to be a Washington State case, reducing today’s number of new cases by 1 to 66. The total number of cases in Klamath County is 30 to reflect this change. To see more case and county-level data, go to the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.
Oregon’s 73rd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old man in Benton County, who tested positive on March 26 and died on April 18 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.
Oregon’s 74th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on March 23 and died on April 11 at OHSU. He had underlying medical conditions.

Saturday, April 18, 2020

Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 59 new COVID-19 cases

COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 70 to 72, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 59 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,844. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (2), Jackson (1), Klamath (2), Linn (2), Marion (18), Multnomah (26), Polk (1), Umatilla (2), and Washington (4).

A case originally reported as a Yamhill County case was later determined to be a Polk County case. The total number of new cases in Polk County is 1 to reflect this change. However, the case that moved from Yamhill County to Polk County is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide for today.

To see more case and county-level data, go to the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 71st COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 2 and died on April 16 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 72nd COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 2 and died on April 17 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Testing update

OHA continues to provide COVID-19 testing through the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory (OSPHL) while Oregon hospitals continue building their laboratory testing capacity. Several Oregon hospital laboratories and commercial laboratories, such as Quest and LabCorp, provide external testing capacity for the state.

OHA is in the process of updating its testing guidance for providers and for OSPHL to augment testing in support of testing goals, including:

  1. Protect health care providers, first responders and critical infrastructure workers.
  2. Increase access to testing in health care settings to appropriately assess, triage and treat patients.
  3. Identify and control the spread of disease in congregate care settings.
  4. Eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in COVID-19 health outcomes.

Longer term, testing is a key strategy for understanding the transmission of the virus and population prevalence of disease. As of April 17, Oregon’s positive testing result has remained fairly consistent at about 5% of tests performed; as compared to the national average of 17.6%.

OSPHL continues to prioritize its testing to identify and control clusters of disease in congregate care settings, including long-term care and correctional facilities.

View the testing report.

Friday, April 17, 2020

COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 70, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 49 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,785. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Deschutes (2), Jackson (1), Lane (1), Linn (3), Marion (8), Multnomah (19), Polk (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (1), Washington (7), and Yamhill (2) . To see more case and county-level data, go to the Oregon Health Authority website, which OHA updates once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 65th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on April 15 and died April 16 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 66th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on April 2 and died April 14 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 67th COVID-19 death is an 86-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on April 6 and died April 15 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 68th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 26 and died April 6 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 69th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on April 12 and died April 16 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 70th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 7 and died April 11 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Epidemic modeling report indicates physical distancing measures are working

Today OHA released an update to its epidemic modeling report, which helps Oregon’s leaders understand the progression and the projections for the COVID-19 outbreak.

“Today’s modeling update tells us that statewide mitigation efforts are keeping the caseload and hospitalizations well below the numbers we would have seen absent our efforts as a state,” said state epidemiologist Dean Sidelinger, MD. “We are encouraged by the continued success of our mitigation efforts, which are allowing us to begin planning for suppression strategies for when the statewide measure can begin to be lifted.”

View the report.

Summary data tables are downloadable now

The summary tables of OHA’s “epi curve” and “persons tested tables” are now live on our website.

To view the summary tables, use a desktop computer to open the OHA Data Dashboard. Click the link for “Summary Table” in the top right corner (the summary tables and data download are best viewed from a desktop, not mobile).

To download the data, click the download button at the bottom of each table (square icon with arrow pointing down). Choose “Crosstab” as the file format to export the data.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

 Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Thursday, April 16

Klamath County reports 3 new COVID-19 cases, 19 recoveries

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials report three new cases of COVID-19 in the community, bringing the total to 29. The total includes 10 active cases and 19 recoveries. In addition to these positive lab results, there have been 1,088 negative tests in Klamath County.

Governor Brown announced a framework this week for lifting “Stay home. Save lives.” There is no indication that what she calls “reopening Oregon” will happen soon, as the intent is to prevent a spike in cases. She did indicate that lifting the “stay home” order will involve the input from local leaders and business people throughout the state. Meanwhile, community members are asked to continue isolating best practices.

It is important that community members continue to stay home, practice social or physical distancing of six feet, disinfect surfaces, and frequently wash their hands. Now that COVID-19 is in the community, these actions are urgent to prevent further spread.

For more information and COVID-19 updates, visit publichealth.klamathcounty.org/coronavirus.

Help keep children healthy and safe
April is National Child Abuse Prevention Awareness Month.  As we respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, many traditional support systems for families are unavailable or altered. Reduced contact with educators, medical professionals, and community members can impact children and families in many ways. And high-stress home environments can increase the likelihood of domestic violence and abuse that children either experience or observe. Everyone can play a part in keeping children healthy and safe. Please call and reach out to families you know to check-in. Report suspected abuse, share crisis hotlines and keep your eyes open. To report suspected abuse or neglect of a child or adult, call 1-855-503-SAFE (7233). This toll-free number receives calls 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year. For resources from Prevent Child Abuse America that you can share with families and friends visit: https://preventchildabuse.org/coronavirus-resources/.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Safely handling delivered items
A few days ago, we shared information about whether you should eat takeout. Our answer was aimed at sharing that contracting COVID-19 through food is unlikely. We want to add some additional safety information about how to handle packaging from takeout food or other items that may be delivered to you. Thanks to our readers for noting this information would be useful to share.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Oregon to receive $38.6M in federal funding to support child care for essential workers
Oregon’s U.S. Senators Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden announced that Oregon will receive nearly $38.6 million in Child Care and Development Block Grant funding to help support families’ child care needs and child care providers throughout the coronavirus pandemic. Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act funding allows Oregon to increase income limits for applicants, allowing more essential workers access to child care. The Department of Human Services has also waived copayments for all families participating in the program. Funding will also support child care centers that are closed during this pandemic so they can stay afloat to serve our communities once more parents go back to work. If you think you are eligible for child care, contact 211 info for a referral: Call 211 and follow the prompt for Child Care Text the keyword “children” or “niños” to 898211 (TXT211). Email children@211info.org. #MyORHealth horizontal rule
Oregon reports 6 COVID-19 deaths, 73 new COVID-19 cases
COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 64, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today. Oregon Health Authority also reported 73 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,736. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (8), Deschutes (4), Douglas (2), Klamath (3), Lane (1), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (15), Multnomah (18), Umatilla (5), Washington (12), and Yamhill (1). To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.Oregon’s 59th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 24 and died on April 13 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.
Oregon’s 60th COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 14 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.
Oregon’s 61st COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 14 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.
Oregon’s 62nd COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 13 and died on April 15 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.
Oregon’s 63rd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Benton County, who tested positive on April 2 and died on April 14 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.
Oregon’s 64th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Marion County, who died April 11 and tested positive April 14. He had underlying medical conditions.

Wednesday, April 15

A note of gratitude
We want to take a moment to appreciate all our readers. Thousands of you recently gave us great feedback about what you want to hear from us and how often. Ninety-four percent of you said you wanted to keep hearing from us daily, and we’re happy to keep the information coming! Many of you have given us ideas for future topics to cover, and we’ve felt the love from you on how much you appreciate this email update. We’ve read all your survey comments and emails and will use them to keep improving the daily Coronavirus Update and other communications. Thank you for the role each of you play to slow the spread of COVID-19. We are grateful to you!#MyORHealth horizontal rule
ICYMI: Oregon Food Bank receives $8 million to support COVID-19 response
On Monday, Governor Kate Brown announced that Oregon will provide $8 million to the Oregon Food Bank, filling an urgent need for Oregon families seeking food assistance during the COVID-19 public health crisis. The Oregon Food Bank Network – which includes 21 regional food banks and more than 1,400 food assistance sites around the state – has seen a dramatic increase in demand. The state will pay Oregon Food Bank weekly, as needed over the next eight weeks, to meet the increased demand. For more information, read Governor Brown’s press release.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
How do I know if the care I need is considered non-urgent?
Health care facilities face an enormous challenge in providing safe care to patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. This is why all elective and non-urgent health care procedures that require personal protective equipment (PPE) have been canceled. In the Governor’s executive order, elective and non-urgent procedures can be rescheduled for no earlier than June 15, 2020. A procedure is exempt from the cancellation requirement if a delay would put the patient at risk of irreversible harm. Risks of irreversible harm include, but are not limited to:
A threat to the patient’s life; Threat of irreversible harm to the patient’s physical or mental health; Threat of permanent dysfunction of an extremity or organ; Risk of cancer metastasis or progression of staging; and risk of rapidly worsening condition (the need for the procedure is time-sensitive).The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) put out guidance recently on non-emergency, elective medical services and treatment to help providers that need to conserve PPE. Additional guidance from OHA about Elective and Non-Urgent Health Care Procedures is located on our website.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Resources to support distance learning
As Oregon moves into “Distance Learning for All” this week, students, families, and educators are going through a significant transition. We encourage you to be patient with yourself and your family as you try to adjust to this new situation. The Oregon Department of Education has created a guide for online learning. It includes recommendations for incorporating learning into your new daily life. One tip is to spark simple conversation: Support your child’s thinking with questions. Open-ended questions will stimulate more conversation than questions that can be answered with a yes or no. Whenever possible, refrain from judging your child’s thinking by asking them to clarify or justify. And remember, even boredom has value — it can spark creativity and problem-solving. Read an article or view a documentary together and ask questions like “What do you notice?” or “What do you wonder?”Use books, images or online resources to spark deeper conversations. Ask about and share feelings with family members about recent changes in routine. Find more suggestions on maintaining routines, learning in everyday life and more in the guide for online learning and on ODE’s Distance Learning for All website.

COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 58, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 33 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,663. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (7), Columbia (3), Douglas (1), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marin (5), Multnomah (10), Umatilla (1), and Washington (2).

Three cases previously reported in Washington County were reclassified during routine data reconciliation. Two of the cases were removed and one was transferred to Washington state after residency was confirmed. These modifications reduce the cumulative statewide total by three. To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 56th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Marion County, who tested positive on April 3 and died on April 10 at Santiam Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 57th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 12 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 58th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 9 and died on April 12 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

“We all want to get back to work and return to normal life as quickly as possible. But the truth is: the best path forward is a cautious one — a path that proceeds gradually, carefully, and incrementally… As we prepare in the months ahead to get Oregon back to work, we must remember the importance of doing so in a smart and deliberate fashion that keeps us moving forward instead of sending us backward.”Governor Kate Brown#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Governor Brown Introduces Framework for Reopening Oregon
Today Governor Kate Brown introduced a framework for reopening public life and business in Oregon while maintaining healthy communities. The governor stated that in order to begin reopening communities, Oregon must first slow the growth of COVID-19, as well as acquire adequate personal protective equipment to protect health care workers and first responders. Once those prerequisites are met, Oregon can begin to reopen by Ramping up COVID-19 testing capacity in every region of Oregon
Developing robust contact tracing systems to track and contain COVID-19 cases
Establishing a quarantine and isolation program for new cases View the recording of the governor’s press conference
#MyORHealth horizontal rule
OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Data Report has been posted
OHA’s “COVID-19 Weekly Report” shares and analyzes the demographic trends within Oregon’s positive COVID-19 cases. Information you can find in the report includes signs and symptoms from COVID-19 cases, reported risk factors, cases by sex, and reported demographic characteristics of cases. New information added this week includes data for assisted living, adult foster homes, and long-term care facilities, as well as congregate living facilities (i.e., senior living communities) that have 3 or more, confirmed COVID-19 cases or one or more death. Download the COVID-19 Weekly Data Report. or see below.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Protect Yourself: Don’t self-medicate
There are currently no medications or treatments that are effective at preventing or treating COVID-19 and many of the home remedies people have tried are dangerous. We’re urging Oregonians to continue practicing physical or social distancing, frequent handwashing and frequent cleaning of high-touch surfaces. Please avoid self-medicating and consult a healthcare professional for your health needs. If you have questions about poisoning, contact the Oregon Poison Center at 1-800-222-1222

COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 55, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 50 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,633. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (3), Deschutes (1), Douglas (3), Jefferson (1), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Marion (9), Multnomah (22), Tillamook (1), Washington (5), and Yamhill (2) .

A case previously reported in Columbia County was reclassified to negative based on revised test results, reducing the cumulative statewide total by 1 case. To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health Authority updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 54th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 1 and died on April 12 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 55th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Benton County, who tested positive on April 11 and died on April 13 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

At an 11 a.m. press conference, Gov. Kate Brown provided her framework for opening Oregon from the “Stay home. Save lives” executive order.

She indicated that there are five points that need to be reached to bring the “shelter-in-place” scenario to an end:

  • Declining growth rate of active cases
  • Sufficient personal protective equipment
  • Hospital surge capacity
  • Robust testing, tracing and isolation strategy
  • Strategies that work for the hardest hit and vulnerable populations, including nursing homes and people experiencing homelessness

Brown said next steps would include:

  • Solicit input on framework for Reopening Oregon from local leaders
  • Consult with the most-affected industries, including restaurants and personal services
  • Complete metrics for reopening and operational plans for testing, tracing and isolation
  • Finalize discrete steps and guidelines for Step-by-Step Reopening of Oregon
  • Ongoing coordination with West Coast states

Visit http://klamathcounty.org/coronavirus for updates as they become available.

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials report another case of COVID-19 in the community, bringing the total to 26. The total includes 11 active cases and 15 recoveries. In addition to these positive lab results, there have been 965 negative tests in Klamath County.

Oregon is in its third week of the “Stay home. Save lives” executive order by Governor Brown. With the warmer days and longer daylight hours, many people are wanting to spend time outside. This can be done while observing social distancing.

It is important that community members continue to stay home, practice social or physical distancing of six feet, disinfect surfaces, and frequently wash their hands. Now that COVID-19 is in the community, these actions are urgent to prevent further spread.

For more information and COVID-19 updates, visit publichealth.klamathcounty.org/coronavirus.

Monday, April 13

Oregon reports 1 new COVID-19 death, 57 new COVID-19 cases

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 53, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 57 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,584. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Columbia (2), Douglas (2), Jackson (1), Josephine (1), Lane (4), Marion (4), Multnomah (24), and Washington (12). To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 53rd COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old Washington County resident, who tested positive on March 30 and died on April 12 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Sunday, April 12

COVID-19 has claimed 1 more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 51 to 52, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 80 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1527. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (4), Deschutes (1), Douglas (2), Jackson (2), Josephine (1), Lane (2), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (13), Multnomah (31), Umatilla (2), Wasco (1), and Washington (18). To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s fifty-second COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 25, 2020, and died on March 25, 2020. She had underlying conditions.

Saturday, April 11

COVID-19 has claimed 3 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 48 to 51, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 76 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1447. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (5), Coos (1), Deschutes (2), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Linn (2), Malheur (1), Marion (17), Multnomah (26), Polk (1), Umatilla (3), Union (1), Wasco (2), Washington (10), and Yamhill (2). To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s forty-ninth COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 31, 2020, and died on April 8, 2020 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s fiftieth COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 9, 2020, and died on April 10, 2020 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s fifty-first COVID-19 case is an 81-year-old man in Josephine County, who tested positive on March 27, 2020, and died on April 10, 2020, at Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

 New projections from health researchers estimate that Oregon’s “aggressive” social distancing measures have prevented as many as 18,000 cases of COVID-19 and 500 hospitalizations, however these restrictions must be maintained into May to prevent new cases from rising above current daily levels of active coronavirus cases. By following Governor Brown’s stay at home executive orders, Oregonians are preventing a surge in new infections that could overwhelm hospital beds if left unchecked. Researchers noted that Oregon’s “health care systems would likely have become overburdened by late April in the absence of these sustained interventions to keep the number of infections under control.”

The latest model is based on the latest actual COVID-19 infection, hospitalization and death data. Researchers lengthened their assumptions on hospital length-of-stay based on the accumulation of additional data from Oregon cases. The results are used to aid in planning the state’s response. According to the latest report, which extends modeling until May 18:

  • Cumulative COVID-19 infections: Under current social distancing conditions, the total cumulative infections with COVID-19 in Oregon on May 18 would be fewer than 20,000. However, if the state were to return to moderate social distancing (i.e., reopen non-essential businesses while keeping schools closed), the number of new infections would quickly climb to more than 60,000 by May 18.
  • Active infections: Active infections would stay at currently projected levels of more than 2,000 cases per day through mid-May and then begin to slowly subside, if the state maintains current social distancing measures. However, if the state were to return to moderate social distancing, the number of active infections each day would spike to more than 17,000 per day.
  • Hospital beds needed: The projected adult acute care and intensive care bed usage will remain below the available capacity in Oregon through the model period (through May 18).

The models were prepared by the Institute for Disease Modeling in Washington. Based on the data, researchers predict there are approximately 7,000 cases of active infection in Oregon at this time. 

Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer at OHA, said: “Staying at home and maintaining physical distancing is difficult and has had serious economic impacts that have affected many people, but the data continue to show that Oregonians are saving lives by staying home. The latest projections are more conservative than previous versions of the model because they account for variables such as longer hospital stays or the likelihood that COVID-19 has been in Oregon longer than we initially estimated. However, even these estimates, show we can slow new COVID-19 infections and ultimately begin to drive them down if we can sustain today’s social distancing measures.”

According to the model released today, the state should expect to see fewer than 500 hospitalizations per day due to COVID-19 if social distancing remains in place and hospitals in Oregon would use fewer than 200 intensive care unit beds per day. However, Oregon hospitals would need nearly 2,000 beds per day by May 18, if current stay home orders were relaxed. 

State officials continue to focus on strengthening the health care system’s ability to meet the coming surge. State health officials are working with hospitals and other health care partners to mobilize the health care workforce and keep workers safe, expand bed capacity and secure more ventilators in the event COVID-19 cases begin to rapidly escalate.

Friday, April 10

Klamath County Report

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials report two more cases of COVID-19 in the community, bringing the total to 25. The total includes 14 active cases and 11 recoveries. There have been 603 tests given in Klamath County.

Numbers reported by KCPH differ from those of the Oregon Health Authority, because KCPH reports positive test results as soon as they are reported by a laboratory. This provides the most accurate view of the virus within the community.

Due to conflicting national and statewide reports about the initiative to have people stay at home, many people are attempting to resume their normal lifestyle behaviors. Governor Brown’s closure of schools through the remainder of the school year is an indication that her order to “Stay home. Save lives” will not end in the immediate future.

It is important that community members continue to stay home, practice social or physical distancing of six feet, disinfect surfaces, and frequently washing their hands. Now that COVID-19 is in the community, these actions are urgent to prevent further spread.

For more information and COVID-19 updates, visit publichealth.klamathcounty.org/coronavirus.

Thank you, local public health departments!

It’s National Public Health Week, and we want to take a moment to acknowledge the work of Oregon’s local public health departments.  Every day of the year, state and county public health departments work to promote health in our communities, prevent the spread of disease and foster health by promoting spaces for Oregonians to live, work and play.

We offer thanks to county health departments for their commitment to this cause as we face the biggest public health crisis of our time.We also thank the people of Oregon. Now more than ever, we are all part of the public health response as we honor social or physical distancing measures and keep our neighbors healthy.

If you want to join us in recognizing your local public health department, the American Public Health Association has some great shareable graphics to say #ThankYouPublicHealth!#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Rapid-test machines sent to three rural hospitals in Oregon

Governor Kate Brown announced that Oregon has distributed its first Abbott ID NOW rapid testing instruments to rural Oregon hospitals. The first hospitals to receive the COVID-19 rapid testing instruments are Curry General Hospital in Curry County, Pioneer Memorial Hospital in Morrow County, and Lake District Hospital in Lake County.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) sent Oregon 15 testing machines, the same number sent to all other states, along with a small supply of testing kits and materials. The testing machines are capable of returning positive or negative test results in minutes. The three hospitals will begin validation testing this week. Rapid testing will not be immediately available to the public.

Oregon has ordered additional test kits for the rapid test machines. The CDC has not made it clear how many or when Oregon will receive these supplies. For more details, read the Governor’s press release
.
#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Changes to insurance payments and deadlines as a result of COVID-19

T
o support consumers during this crisis, the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS) issued a temporary emergency order that requires all insurance companies to: Institute a grace period for premium payments on all insurance policies issued in the state. Suspend all cancellations and non-renewals for active insurance policies.

Extend all deadlines for consumers to report claims and communicate about claims.

Provide consumers the ability to make premium payments and report claims while maintaining safe social distancing standards. The order will be in force through April 23. If necessary, the department may extend the duration of this temporary order.

If you have questions or concerns about your insurance company or agent, contact DCBS’s advocacy team at 888-877-4894 or visit dfr.oregon.gov for more information or to file a complaint.

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

COVID-19 claims 6 more lives; Oregon reports 83 new cases

COVID-19 has claimed 6 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 44, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today. Oregon Health Authority also reported 83 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the state total to 1,321 as of Friday morning, April 10th.

The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (5), Jackson (4), Klamath (1), Lane (2), Linn (3), Marion (17), Morrow (2), Multnomah (16), Polk (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (3), Washington (16), and Yamhill (4). A previously reported Wallowa County case was identified as a Washington State resident, reducing the Wallowa County case total and the statewide case count by 1. 

To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 39th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on March 22 and died on April 3 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 40th COVID-19 death is a 97-year-old man in Linn County, who tested positive on March 15 and died on April 4 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.
Oregon’s 41st
 COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 6 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 42nd COVID-19 death is a 41-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 5 and died on April 8 at Oregon Health and Sciences University. She had underlying medical conditions.
Oregon’s 43rd COVID-19 death is a 66-year-old man in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 31 and died on April 5 at his residence. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 44th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Benton County, who tested positive on March 26 and died on April 8 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis. He had underlying medical conditions.

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials report another case of COVID-19 in the community, bringing the total to 23. The total includes 14 active cases and nine recoveries. There have been 506 tests given in Klamath County.

Numbers reported by KCPH differ from those of the Oregon Health Authority, because KCPH reports positive test results as soon as they are reported by a laboratory. This provides the most accurate view of the virus within the community.

Many local individuals are beginning to watch the Institute for Health Metrics Evaluation model for Oregon’s COVID-19 experience. It indicates the daily use of resources to meet the COVID-19 crisis will be at its highest point later this month. The model shows resource use tapering off afterward. That projection depends upon continued practices of staying home, social or physical distancing of six feet, disinfecting surfaces, and frequent handwashing.

The model is an important scientific tool, but any change in the environment, such as being less vigilant about any of the practices now in place to slow the spread of COVID-19, changes the date of when the most resources would be used.

For more information and COVID-19 updates, visit publichealth.klamathcounty.org/coronavirus.

Age groupCasesEver hospitalizedDeaths
0-19
20-294
30-398
40-4931
50-5931
60-6941
70-791
80 and over
Not available
Total2330
SexCasesDeaths
Male9
Female14
Unknown
Total230

Oregon schools will remain closed for the rest of the academic year

By Eder Campuzano | The Oregonian/OregonLive

Oregon’s public school students will not return to their classrooms this academic year.

Gov. Kate Brown on Wednesday announced that her school closure order, originally slated to end April 28, will now stretch into June in an effort to maintain the state’s progress in stemming the spread of the novel coronavirus.

“School and learning will continue as best as we can using remote means,” Brown said, adding she wanted to give parents, educator and students certainty about the rest of the school year.

Oregon Department of Education officials had anticipated the mandate, urging the state’s public school districts in late March to adopt distance learning plans and launch them by April 13.

Jim Green, head of the Oregon School Boards Association, said in reaction to Wednesday’s news, “It has appeared for some time this day was coming, but it’s a difficult day all the same. It’s sad to think of families unable to experience the graduation moment celebrating years of hard work by students. It’s sad to think of empty classrooms, further disruptions in learning, and knowing that some students’ needs will be unmet. But these are unprecedented times, and we support the governor’s decision in the interest of protecting public health.”

Brown also said she and state schools chief Colt Gill have long-awaited guidance for schools, parents and high school seniors about how members of how officials will decide whether members of the class of 2020 qualify for a diploma.

All seniors who were on track to graduate when schools closed in mid-March, including having passing grades at that point in any course required for graduation, will receive passing grades and earn diplomas, she said. That right to graduate is locked in for those students, regardless of their participation in learning after schools closed.

Brown called on districts to give extra attention and special opportunities to any students who had Fs in one or more needed courses on March 13 to help them “get across the finish line.”

Some districts began their first week of distance learning Monday. Oregon education officials’ insistence that districts educate their students from afar was an about-face from their previous position.

As recently as March 19, both state and local education officials said they simply lacked the infrastructure to adopt an online learning strategy that can serve all of their students equally, in particular children with disabilities and for whom English is a second language.

Brown’s original closure order closed public schools to shutter for two weeks surrounding spring break. The governor extended that mandate to April 28 days later.

The closure order required districts to provide students with supplemental learning material, either online or distributed in physical packets, in order to continue collecting state funding. Districts also had to provide meals for their students and pay teachers for the length of the closure.

Brown’s original order also barred the state’s public online academies from enrolling new students.

COVID-19 has claimed 4 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 33, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 49 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 1,181. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (7), Clatsop (1), Deschutes (4), Klamath (1), Lane (1), Linn (1), Marion (6), Multnomah (15), Polk (2), Washington (11). To see more case and county-level data, Oregon Health Authority updates its website once a day: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 30th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 5 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 31st COVID-19 death is a 98-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on April 1 and died April 5 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 32nd COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old female in Marion County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 2 in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 33rd COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old female in Washington County, who tested positive on March 27 and died April 6 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

New weekly report on COVID-19 cases in Oregon

Starting today, OHA will begin posting a weekly report that represents a snapshot of COVID-19 risk factors, clinical and demographic characteristics, and includes data on cases with pending investigations. You can review the report here.

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials have announced a new COVID-19 case in the county. It brings the county case count to 22, with 21 being active and one recovery. There have been 399 tests given in the county.

More testing kits are now in the county. Individuals who are not showing symptoms should not be tested. The kits should be used to determine a diagnosis for a person with symptoms. As more testing happens, more positive cases will be found.

It is important to look at the number of people who have been hospitalized, only three, in relation to the overall total of 22. Evidence is showing that people may contract the virus and have no symptoms. They may infect others without realizing it. This is why it is important to continue the practices of staying home, social or physical distancing of six feet, disinfecting surfaces, and frequent handwashing.

For more information and COVID-19 updates, visit publichealth.klamathcounty.org/coronavirus.

Staying socially connected while keeping our physical distanceWe are going to move away from using “social distancing” to describe the ways we work together to slow the spread of COVID-19. Following the World Health Organization, we will shift to the term “physical distancing” to acknowledge that while it’s important to stay physically separated from each other, supporting each other socially is important to our health and well-being. Thanks for checking in on your friends and loved ones to help keep them socially connected during this time.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
OHA posts interactive case and testing data on COVID-19 website
OHA today posted a new data dashboard to visualize the epidemic curve, which displays the number of cases by date of symptom onset, and a graph with the number of Oregonians tested per day. When people say we need to flatten the curve, the epidemic curve is what they’re talking about. Governor Kate Brown’s Stay Home, Save Lives orders ask us to make sacrifices to slow the spread of COVID-19. We need to slow the spread because too many cases too soon could overwhelm our health system, leaving some patients unable to receive needed care. By spreading the cases over a longer period of time, or flattening the curve, our health system can better absorb them. Watch the video below to learn more about how to understand this data.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Protecting yourself from COVID-19 if you have asthma
While we’re still learning about COVID-19, the CDC believes people with asthma may be at higher risk of serious illness related to COVID-19.  COVID-19 can affect your respiratory tract (nose, throat, lungs), cause an asthma attack, and possibly lead to pneumonia and acute respiratory disease. If you have asthma, here are steps you can take to protect your health:Protecting your health from COVID-19 when you have asthma#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Understanding coverage if you have Medicare
For those who have Medicare coverage, you should know that Medicare covers COVID-19 related needs. Medicare covers lab tests for COVID-19. You pay no out-of-pocket costs. It also covers all medically necessary hospitalizations. This includes if you’re diagnosed with COVID-19 and might otherwise have been discharged from the hospital after an inpatient stay, but instead, you need to stay in the hospital under quarantine. At this time, there’s no vaccine for COVID-19. However, if one becomes available, it will be covered by all Medicare Prescription Drug Plans (Part D). If you have a Medicare Advantage Plan, you have access to these same benefits. Medicare allows these plans to waive cost-sharing for COVID-19 lab tests. Many plans offer additional telehealth benefits. Check with your plan about your coverage and costs. We also want to remind you that scammers may use the coronavirus pandemic to take advantage of people. As always, guard your Medicare card like a credit card. Check Medicare claims summary forms for errors. And if someone calls asking for your Medicare number, hang up!

Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 64 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 29, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 64 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (6), Columbia (2), Curry (2), Deschutes (1), Douglas (1), Jackson (6), Josephine (3), Klamath (3), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marion (11), Multnomah (10), Polk (2), Umatilla (1), Washington (12). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 28th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old male in Washington County, who tested positive on March 30 and died April 4, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s 29th COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old female in Marion county, who tested positive on April 1 and died April 2, in her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Update: The COVID-19 case data OHA publishes once a day on its website and shares once a day with the media are provisional and subject to change. A case reported yesterday as a Yamhill County case was later determined to be a Washington County case. The total number of new cases in Washington County is 12 to reflect this change. However, the case that moved from Yamhill County to Washington County is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide for today.

New dashboard to help visualize COVID-19 data in Oregon


OHA today unveiled a new dashboard to help visualize COVID-19 data and trends in Oregon. The two graphs show Oregon’s epidemiological curve and the number of Oregonians who have been tested for COVID-19.

These data are provisional. Our team of epidemiologists continues to review and verify data, so our reported numbers will change. As we get more information, we update the data from previous days.

You can find a link to our data dashboard on OHA’s main COVID-19 web page at http://healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Watch this video for an overview of the dashboard.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials have announced six new COVID-19 cases in the county. It brings the county case count to 21, with 20 being active and one recovery. There have been 355 tests given in the county.

New cases are not a surprise as testing is now more available. It is important to look at the number of people who have been hospitalized, only three, in relation to the overall total of 21. Also, evidence is showing that people may contract the virus and have no symptoms. They may infect others without realizing it. This is why it is important to continue the practices of staying home, social or physical distancing of six feet, disinfecting surfaces, and frequent handwashing.

The CDC issued guidance that wearing a cloth mask or other fabric face covering may provide some protection to individuals in the community from asymptomatic people who are sick. KCPH officials encourage anyone who wears a mask to remember not to touch their face and to wash their mask after every use. Additionally, people opting to use a mask are asked should not use N95 or surgical masks, as those are reserved for healthcare workers.

Klamath County has a new confirmed COVID-19 case

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. – Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials have announced a new COVID-19 case in the county. It brings the county case count to 15, with 14 being active and one recovery. There have been 293 tests given in the county.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also just announced that people should wear fabric masks to slow the spread of COVID-19.Jackson County Public Health made a similar announcement last week.

KCPH officials want community members to know that wearing a mask does not remove the need to keep six feet of social or physical distance from others and practice good hygiene, often washing hands and disinfecting surfaces. People opting to use a mask should not to use N95 or surgical masks, as those are reserved for healthcare workers.

COVID-19 is now in the community. Many people will contract the virus and have no symptoms. They may infect others without realizing it. That is why staying at home, social or physical distancing, and frequent handwashing is so important.

For more information and COVID-19 updates, visit publichealth.klamathcounty.org/coronavirus.

State of Oregon Update

Stay informed to flatten the curveAs of today, Oregon has reported more than 1,000 COVID-19 cases for the first time. (More details are below.) We know this is alarming to hear, but your efforts are helping to flatten the curve. Thank you for all you’re doing to help, including staying informed.#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Homemade masks can supplement but not replace Stay Home, Save Lives ordersIn light of the CDC’s new guidance on homemade masks or cloth face coverings, Oregon Health Authority is reminding Oregonians that staying home and avoiding all non-essential contact with others continues to be the most important thing all of us can do to stay healthy and keep others healthy. OHA also asks that medical masks be saved for health care workers, who are on the front lines of caring for those with COVID-19. Read more from OHA on homemade masks here.Masks guidance#MyORHealth horizontal rule
Talking to children and teens about COVID-19Students are spending a significant time out of school due to COVID-19. It is natural they may feel stress and anxiety about when they will get to return to their regular routines with their teachers and their friends. Children will likely have many questions about what the virus is, why schools are closed, and why they have limited access to friends and family. The Oregon Department of Education has put together resources for talking with children about COVID-19.

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 26 to 27, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. Sunday.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 69 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. Sunday. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (6), Columbia (3), Klamath (1), Lane (3), Linn (2), Marion (10), Multnomah (24), Polk (2), Sherman (1), Umatilla (2), Washington (12), Yamhill (3). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 27th COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old female in Multnomah County, who tested positive on April 2, 2020, and died on April 2, 2020, in her residence. It is unknown at this time if she had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon reports 1 new COVID-19 death, 73 new COVID-19 cases

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 22, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 73 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (5), Clatsop (1), Crook (1), Deschutes (4), Klamath (5), Malheur (1), Marion (14), Morrow (1), Multnomah (15), Polk (2), Washington (17), Yamhill (5). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 22nd COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Polk County, who tested positive on March 19 and died April 2 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying medical conditions.

OHA: Non-medical masks can supplement but not replace Stay Home, Save Lives.

With recent news that federal authorities may recommend wearing masks in public, Oregon Health Authority is reminding Oregonians that staying home and avoiding all non-essential contact with others continues to be the most important thing all of us can do to stay healthy and keep others healthy. And during moments where people must go out of the house, they should stay at least 6 feet apart from others at all times.

Before deciding whether to wear a mask, Oregon Health Authority recommends people keep two considerations central:

  • Medical masks should be reserved for health care providers who are on the front lines working with patients most likely to have COVID-19. We have had shortages of those masks – and it’s critically important that our health care workers have the equipment they need to do their jobs.
  • Non-medical mask use (e.g., homemade fabric masks) does not replace the need to follow guidance to stay home and limit our contact with others. It does not replace frequent handwashing, avoiding touching the face, and staying away from people who are ill. These are the most important steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19 illness.

“We continue to stress that medical masks are essential for health care workers who are in close contact with someone who has COVID-19,” said Paul Cieslak, MD, medical director for communicable diseases, OHA Public Health Division. “We need to preserve supplies of medical masks for our health care workers so they can stay safe as they work to keep all of us healthy. For the general public, homemade fabric masks, especially if well-made and well-fitting, may provide some benefit.”

Wearing a fabric mask can help prevent the spread of infection to others when the mask is worn by someone who already is infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, particularly if the person is coughing. The mask may block some infectious droplets from spreading when someone with the infection coughs, sneezes and, to a lesser degree, speaks.

“The data do not tell us how much protection homemade cloth masks provide to the person wearing a homemade mask. For this reason, homemade and fabric masks should not be considered reliable protection; but they may provide some benefit,” said Cieslak. “Above all, we continue to stress that the reliable tool we have right now to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is strict social distancing – as outlined in Governor Brown’s ‘Stay Home, Save Lives’ orders.”

Everyone, even people who are young and healthy, must stay home to slow the spread of COVID-19. Read more here about Governor Brown’s “Stay Home, Save Lives” orders. Read more here about OHA’s social distancing guidelines.

Changes in hospital reporting

COVID-19 hospital capacity data on today’s Daily Update, formerly labeled the Situation Status Report, or Sit Stat, is listed as “pending” due to data quality issues. OHA is working with its partner hospitals to improve the COVID-19 data reporting process so we can ensure the accuracy, consistency and timeliness of the underlying data. The state has paused our public reporting so OHA can provide additional technical assistance to hospital staff. OHA will resume public reporting of COVID-19 hospital capacity data as soon as we have achieved full compliance and consistency in data reporting across all sources.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Klamath County has 2 new confirmed COVID-19 cases

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. – Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials have announced two new COVID-19 cases in the county. These bring the county case count to 14, with 13 being active and one recovery. There have been 235 tests given in the county.

KCPH staff know there is concern in the community about the increased case number. It is important that everyone takes this virus seriously. People can show their support for keeping the community healthy by staying home as much as possible and practicing social distancing, when leaving home is necessary. It is also important to understand that increased access to testing will find more cases. This is a positive step to being able to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Test results that show infection are followed up through contact tracing. This allows Public Health to work with the person about quarantine and isolation. It also protects everyone from infection by those members of the community who are at highest risk of exposing others.

COVID-19 is now in the community. Many people will contract the virus and have no symptoms. They may infect others without realizing it. That is why staying at home, social or physical distancing, and frequent handwashing is so important.

To protect the identity of individuals with an illness, KCPH’s threshold for sharing communicable disease demographics is 10 cases.

For more information and COVID-19 updates, visit publichealth.klamathcounty.org/coronavirus.

STAY HOME, SAVE LIVES IS WORKING IN OREGON

New projections from health researchers show there is “strong evidence that measures currently in place in Oregon are reducing transmission,” but these measures need to be maintained to reduce the number of COVID-19 infections in Oregon.

During a virtual press briefing this afternoon, Oregon Office of Emergency Management director Andrew Phelps, along with Dr. Dean Sidelinger of Oregon Health Authority, discussed projections of the disease’s spread in the state. Go to https://oregon-coronavirus-geo.hub.arcgis.com/ to view video from the briefing. Dr. Sidelinger is a specialist in epidemiology and immunization.

“By staying home, Oregonians are doing their part to flatten the curve,” said Andrew Phelps. “When Oregonians stay home, we limit contact with sick people, protect first responders and frontline workers, preserving hospital space, and extend the life of the state’s supply of personal protection equipment, such as masks and gloves.”

Phelps clarified that the briefings will be occurring regularly and that media advisories will be sent out on the days there are webinars. The Oregon Joint Information Center (JIC) may be reached at media.COVID-19@state.or.us or 503-373-7872 with any immediate questions.

Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon reports 2 new COVID-19 deaths, 90 new COVID-19 cases

COVID-19 has claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 19 to 21, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 90 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today bringing the statewide total to 826. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (5), Deschutes (5), Hood River (1), Jackson (5), Josephine (2), Klamath (3), Lane (3), Lincoln (1), Marion (13), Union (2), Multnomah (26), Washington (22), and Yamhill (1). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s twentieth COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man in Washington County, who tested positive on March 21, 2020, and died on April 1, 2020 at Tuality Healthcare. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s twenty-first COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 31, 2020, and died on April 1, 2020 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Update: The COVID-19 case data OHA publishes once a day on its website and shares once a day with the media are provisional and subject to change. A case reported yesterday as a Douglas County case was later determined to be a Lane County case. The total number of new cases in Lane County is 3 to reflect this change. However, the case moved from Douglas County to Lane County is not reflected in the total of new cases statewide for today.

Klamath County has 7 new confirmed COVID-19 cases

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. – Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials have announced seven new COVID-19 cases in the county. These bring the county case count to 12, with 11 being active and one recovery.

While it is now known that Klamath County is experiencing community spread, Klamath County Public Health remains committed to identifying additional exposures when needed to best protect our community. Alaska Airlines Flight 583 from Santa Ana to Portland and Alaska Airlines Flight 2059 from Portland to Medford on March 21 have been identified as potential exposures. This was determined through contact tracing and investigation. Anyone associated with these flights who develop symptoms should contact their local public health agency.

KCPH is working with its colleagues at Jackson County Public Health to ensure the entire region is informed about the possible exposure on these flights.

Community spread is the reason people are asked to practice social distancing and stay home. Most people who contract COVID-19 will not have symptoms or have minor symptoms. Those individuals can carry the virus to infect people who are at greater risk, such as the elderly and those with underlying health conditions.

To protect the identity of individuals with an illness, KCPH’s threshold for sharing communicable disease demographics is 10 cases.

Age groupCasesEver hospitalizedDeath
0-19
20-293
30-391
40-4931
50-592
60-6931

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 19, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 47 new cases of COVID-19 as of 8 a.m. today. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (6), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Jackson (1), Lane (2), Lincoln (1), Marion (10), Multnomah (18), Washington (3), and Yamhill (1). One case previously reported in Hood River County was identified as a resident of another state; thus, today’s statewide case count is 736. Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s nineteenth COVID-19 death is a 70-year-old woman in Multnomah County, who tested positive on March 27, 2020, and died on March 29, 2020 at her residence. She had underlying medical conditions.

Update: The COVID-19 case data OHA publishes once a day on its website and shares once a day with the media are provisional and subject to change. A case reported yesterday as a Hood River County case was later determined to be a Washington State case. The total number of new cases reported as of yesterday has changed from 690 to 689.

KLAMATH BASIN LOCAL NEWS from BASINLIFE.COM, CLICK HERE

Latest COVID-19 projections show social distancing can cut coronavirus infections if Oregonians keep current measures in place into May

Updated projections from health researchers show that there is “strong evidence that measures currently in place in Oregon are reducing transmission,” according to the latest models.  The most recent data suggest that current social distancing measures could cut transmission rates between 50%-70% if Oregonians maintain these limitations on virus-spreading interactions into early May.

If Oregonians can maintain current social distancing efforts and the current projections hold true, the state could meet the likely demand for hospital beds under current strategies. 

According to the latest report, researchers estimate that Oregon has slightly higher numbers of current infections than previously assessed, based on an increase in reported cases from earlier time points.

  • COVID-19 infections: Under current social distancing conditions with the cooperation of most Oregonians to Stay Home, Save Lives, it is estimated that in early May Oregon would have over 4,000 cumulative infections and 200-1,200 active infections. However, if the state were to reopen non-essential businesses (while keeping schools closed), the number of new infections would spike to as many as 3,500 active infections by early May
  • Hospital beds needed: Researchers found “expected demand for hospital beds is predicted to remain relatively constant before decreasing, assuming current or strengthened interventions and continued high compliance
  • Uncertainty: Researchers highlighted that the projections remain uncertain. In coming weeks, state public health officials and researchers will get a better picture of current actual infections and how they affect the projections, as well as more data on the public’s continued adherence to social distancing measures.

The models state health officials released today were prepared by the Institute for Disease Modeling, based in Washington.

Oregon’s emergency response continues to focus on strengthening the health care system’s ability to meet the coming surge. State health officials are working with hospitals and other health care partners to mobilize the health care workforce and keep workers safe, expand bed capacity and secure more ventilators. However, the public’s ability to maintain social distancing will be the most important factor in determining whether Oregon prevents local hospitals from becoming overwhelmed by COVID-19 admissions.

Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer at OHA, said: “We know coronavirus has brought painful disruption and distress for Oregonians. However, these numbers tell us that what we’re doing can work. We know social distancing is tough and comes with incredible sacrifices. But steps we’re all taking to maintain social distancing could save the lives of people we know and people who are important to us. As Oregonians, we all must continue to put Stay Home, Save Lives into practice.”

Allergies symptoms

Now that Spring has arrived, many of us are experiencing allergies. Dr. Ann Thomas from the Oregon Health Authority shares advice on what to do if you’re not sure if your symptoms are regular seasonal allergies or symptoms of COVID-19.
Removing barriers to OHP access during the COVID-19 pandemic

OHA has received flexibility from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to remove barriers for Oregonians to qualify for, enroll in, and stay enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Key changes include: All members who are currently enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan will not lose coverage during this crisis. This includes coverage that is only state-funded (i.e. Covers all Kids). Individuals can sign up for OHP without having to verify their income (submit a pay stub) with their application. They will be able to self-attest, which will help Oregonians get access to OHP coverage more quickly. Federal stimulus payments and increased unemployment payments will not affect OHP eligibility. They will not be counted during the application process or when members report a change in their household. If you’re an OHP member, see OHA’s fact sheet on OHP and COVID-19 for more information: English/Spanish
Helpful resources for those working from home for the first time

Because of social distancing, you might find yourself working from home for the first time. These resources from SAIF can help you set up a safe and comfortable work station at your home. Learn how to set up a work area that reduces physical stressors. Pause periodically for some office stretches. Before work or during breaks, do these core exercises to help prevent injury. In addition, the Oregon Department of Justice offers tips to keep your work information safe from cybersecurity threats.

COVID-19 claims two more lives; Oregon reports 84 new cases

COVID-19 has claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 16 to 18, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today. Oregon Health Authority also reported 84 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 690, as of 8 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (10), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (1), Klamath (1), Lane (4), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (16), Polk (3), Umatilla (1), Wallowa (1), Wasco (2), Washington (18), and Yamhill (2). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 17th COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 25, 2020, and died on March 29, 2020, at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions. Oregon’s 18th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Benton County, who tested positive on March 26, 2020, and died March 30, 2020, at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis. She had underlying medical conditions.

Update: The COVID-19 case data OHA publishes once a day on its website and shares once a day with the media are provisional and subject to change. A case reported yesterday as a Deschutes County case has been updated today to Washington County.



The State of Oregon expects a shipment of personal protective equipment (PPE) today from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Once received, the personnel at the fully operational PPE Distribution Center in Wilsonville will begin processing and shipping those supplies to all 36 counties and 9 tribes in Oregon.

“Having an adequate supply of PPE—masks, gowns, and gloves––is essential for the safety of first responders and health care workers,” said Andrew Phelps, director of the Oregon Office of Emergency Management (OEM). “We’re currently in a global shortage, but Oregon is working to replenish our supplies of PPE through public and private partnerships, distribute those supplies to all 36 counties in Oregon, and ensure health care workers and first responders are protected.”
As of midday today, the state of Oregon has distributed:

Over 1 million gloves
10,000 face shields
Over 400,000 N95 masks
Over 50,000 surgical masks
OEM’s Emergency Coordination Center, which is managing Oregon’s response, plans to ship PPE to each county and Oregon’s 9 tribes, for allocation. Counties are expected to receive shipments by or before April 6.
“Even with the arrival of PPE and critical care supplies for our front line workers, all Oregonians need to continue working together and take preventative action to flatten the curve to reduce the spread of COVID-19,” Phelps added. “By staying in your home, you are helping to flatten the curve. Ultimately, slowing the spread of COVID-19 directly helps to slow the demand for PPE.”
Updated information on the State’s response to COVID-19 is available at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-covid-19.
Phelps’ regular briefings can be viewed https://oregon-
coronavirus-geo.hub.arcgis.com/
.

Tuesday, March 31, 2020

COVID-19 has claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 16 to 18, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 84 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 690, as of 8 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (10), Douglas (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (1), Klamath (1), Lane (4), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Malheur (1), Marion (18), Multnomah (16), Polk (3), Umatilla (1), Wallowa (1), Wasco (2), Washington (18), and Yamhill (2). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s seventeenth COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man in Yamhill County, who tested positive on March 25, 2020, and died on March 29, 2020, at Providence Newberg Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s eighteenth COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Benton County, who tested positive on March 26, 2020, and died March 30, 2020, at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis. She had underlying medical conditions.

Update: The COVID-19 case data OHA publishes once a day on its website and shares once a day with the media are provisional and subject to change. A case reported yesterday as a Deschutes County case has been updated today to Washington County.

Oregon Health Authority gains flexibility in its Medicaid program to better serve low-income Oregonians during COVID-19 pandemic

The Oregon Health Authority has received flexibility from the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to remove barriers for Oregonians to qualify for, enroll in, and stay enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Oregon has also received flexibility for providers to provide care to members as the state responds to the COVID-19 pandemic. Nearly one in four Oregonians currently receives health coverage through OHP.

“The COVID-19 pandemic requires us to act quickly to support the needs of our communities,” said Patrick Allen, director of the Oregon Health Authority. “This added flexibility in our Medicaid program is going to allow us to more quickly get people to access health care and expand our health system to meet the challenges of this public health emergency.”

The key areas of flexibility that Oregon will gain from this waiver include:

  • All members who are currently enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan will not lose coverage during this crisis. This includes coverage that is only state-funded (i.e. Cover all the Kids).
  • Individuals can sign up for OHP without having to verify their income (submit a pay stub) with their application. They will be able to self-attest, which will help Oregonians get access to OHP coverage more quickly.
  • Federal stimulus payments and increased unemployment payments will not affect OHP eligibility. They will not be counted during the application process or when members report a change in their household.
  • Oregon will have additional flexibility to add to its healthcare workforce, provide treatment in temporary sites, and for paying providers during this public health emergency.

Additional information and guidance related to COVID-19 for coordinated care organizations (CCOs) and providers serving OHP members is available on the OHA website. A fact sheet for OHP members about their coverage and COVID-19 can be downloaded on the OHP website in English and in Spanish.

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials have announced a new COVID-19 case in the county. This brings the total case count to five, with one recovery and four active cases.

The information was not in today’s statewide tally, as KCPH personnel learned of the positive test after the formalizing of Monday numbers at 8 a.m. It will be released by the state tomorrow. Oregon Health Authority releases daily numbers, compiled by 8 a.m. each day, during the noon hour.

Contact tracing is underway. This case is thought to be community spread. Once Public Health is aware of a positive case, it works with the individual to determine close contacts who might be at risk. Possible times and areas of exposure are also announced when known. Those individuals who may have been exposed are given instructions and next steps to prevent further exposure within the community.

People who have had a fever, dry cough, or difficulty breathing are asked to remain home until 72 hours after the symptoms stop, without the use of medication. Anyone needing medical help is asked to call ahead so protective measures can be taken. Individuals with life-threatening symptoms should go to the emergency room.

“Our highest priority is the health and safety of our community. We will take all steps necessary to ensure safety while also holding to our core value of integrity. We will not release the name, address or other identifying information about these people,” said Jennifer Little, KCPH director. “It is a matter of patient confidentiality.”

In Klamath County, the expectation is that these individuals and their families be able to recover without being the targets of social media attacks and the stigmatization that has occurred in other Oregon communities.

The best way to prevent the spread of germs is to:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Stay home when you are sick. Call before seeking medical care.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

Monday March 30, 2020

2 New COVID-19 Cases in Klamath County, includes the first potential community-spread case.

Thank you! Today we wanted to take a moment to thank you, our Coronavirus Update subscribers. We’ve been working to keep you informed with the most up-to-date health resources and information to help keep you, your family and all of Oregon safe. You can help us make sure we’re delivering the information you need most when you want it by filling out a quick survey. We’re hoping to find out what updates you want to see more of and how frequently. You’ll also have the chance to share any ideas you have about what we could do with the newsletter to serve you better.
Recipes you can make with what you have on hand On a regular day, cooking can be a challenge. These days, you might be running low on time and energy, not to mention ingredients. Food Hero, an initiative of the Oregon Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education, has some resources that can help. Its searchable database has plenty of quick, tasty, healthy and low-cost recipes. You can search by a particular ingredient you have on hand or sort by category (including five ingredients or less, 30 minutes or less, kid-approved and others). Food Hero is also offering free online gardening lessons for kids and adults.
Oregon reports 69 new COVID-19 cases PORTLAND, Ore.— Oregon Health Authority reported 69 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 548, as of 8 a.m. today. No new deaths were reported. The number of COVID-19 deaths in Oregon remains at 13, as of 8 a.m. today. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Deschutes (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (11), Josephine (1), Klamath (2), Lane (1), Linn (4), Marion (15), Multnomah (10), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Wasco (1), Washington (14). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirusStay informed about COVID-19: Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response. United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response. Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Oregon Health Authority reported 69 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 548, as of 8 a.m. today. No new deaths were reported. The number of COVID-19 deaths in Oregon remains at 13, as of 8 a.m. today.

 The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Deschutes (3), Hood River (1), Jackson (11), Josephine (1), Klamath (2), Lane (1), Linn (4), Marion (15), Multnomah (10), Polk (2), Tillamook (1), Wasco (1), Washington (14). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

 Update: The 93-year-old man whose death was reported yesterday had an underlying condition. The data posted once a day on the Oregon Health Authority’s website and shared once a day with the media are provisional and may be updated as more information becomes available after the daily reporting.

OVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 12, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 98 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 414, as of 8 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (10), Columbia (1), Deschutes (3), Douglas (1), Jackson (2), Klamath (1), Lane (2), Linn (2), Marion (26), Morrow (1), Multnomah (22), Polk (4), Umatilla (1), Wasco (1), Washington (18), Yamhill (4). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s 12th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Marion County. She tested positive on March 20 and died March 25 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

Video linkDawn Mautner, senior health advisor at Oregon Health Authority, explains the increase in case numbers during an internal agency briefing today.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

COVID-19 has claimed 1 more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 11.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 50 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 316 known cases as of Friday morning.

The COVID-19 cases reported are in the following counties: Clatsop (1), Deschutes (5), Josephine (2), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marion (14), Multnomah (12), Polk (3), Tillamook (1), Wasco (1), and Washington (8). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website and today new demographic information was added: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s eleventh COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on 3/15/2020, and died 3/25/2020 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon releases health care system action plan to fight COVID-19

New projections show social distancing must be maintained to protect the health care system

The fight against the coronavirus depends on Oregon hospitals having enough beds to treat the coming surge in patients who will become seriously ill with the virus. Today, Oregon health officials and hospitals announced a joint statewide action plan to dramatically bolster the state’s ability to treat people with COVID-19 illness who need hospital care.

The plan was developed by the “Governor’s Joint Task Force for Health Care Systems Response to COVID-19,” convened by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). It includes a broad range of health systems, health care providers, human services organizations, public health and public safety agencies, insurers and other organizations needed in the battle.

The plan addresses 4 urgent actions necessary to expand the health care system’s capacity and maintain its capability as Oregon braces for a projected spike in new coronavirus cases:

  1. Procure and distribute critical medical supplies, including personal protective equipment (PPE) for health care workers and ventilators.
  2. Optimize hospital capacity to be able to treat COVID-19 cases.
  3. Mobilize the health care workforce to respond to COVID-19.
  4. Maintain a unified, coordinated and transparent emergency response to COVID-19.

New projections of COVID-19 cases in Oregon show the state is at a critical moment in the fight against the disease. Social distancing measures could alter the trajectory of new infections, which gives Oregon’s health care system the chance to ramp up to meet the coming surge. But the state has little margin for error. A return to “business as usual” or slight differences in actual infection rates (compared to projected ones) could swamp hospitals with more coronavirus cases than they could treat.

Governor Brown said, “Hospital leaders and health officials are doing their part to find beds, secure supplies and protect health care workers. Oregonians can make a difference too: stay home and save lives. We all have a role to play in an unprecedented, unified effort across Oregon to stop the coronavirus from taking the tragic toll we’ve seen it claim elsewhere.”

State agencies, hospitals, and health care providers have already begun to implement the plan.

  • The state is collecting PPE for re-distribution to facilities in need.
  • Regional hospitals have signed mutual aid agreements to shift equipment, workforce, and patients from overburdened facilities to others with adequate capacity.
  • The state is working with providers to stand-up alternate care locations (such as the Oregon Medical Station), identify and develop new alternate care sites, enable ambulatory care centers to house patients and re-purpose long-term care facilities.
  • The state and hospitals are sharing hospital bed utilization data so hospitals can manage the use of beds and equipment across their region.
  • The state is developing childcare options for health care workers, so their work isn’t interrupted by school closings and family responsibilities.

OHA Director Patrick Allen said, “Oregon’s health care system began preparing for a pandemic years ago, which gave us a head start on this plan. From expanding testing to securing more ventilators for Oregon hospitals, we are united by a set of common strategies to save lives in every corner of the state.”

The latest models state health officials released today forecast the following outcomes for 3 different scenarios:

  • Return to business as usual: If Oregon lifted all the social distancing measures state leaders have instituted in recent weeks, there will be an estimated 15,000 cumulative infections by May 8th (within a range of 5,900-26,000). Approximately 1,100 people would need inpatient beds (850 AAC/250 ICU) across Oregon.
  • Maintain bans on large gatherings and indefinite school closures: There would be an estimated 6,100 cumulative infections by May 8th (within a range of 2,000-12,000) and 340 people will need inpatient beds (260 AAC/80 ICU).
  • Maintain aggressive interventions put into place on Monday, March 23rd (i.e.., Stay Home, Save Lives) with high public adherence: There will be an estimated 1,000 (within a possible range of 700-3,800) cumulative infections by May 8th. Under this scenario, hospitals would have to boost capacity by a smaller number of beds.

The models show that only aggressive interventions, like the Stay Home, Save Lives executive order Governor Brown issued on March 23rd, are predicted to decrease the number of active infections.

The models state health officials released today were prepared by the Institute for Disease Modeling. While similar to projections completed earlier by researchers at Oregon Health and Sciences University (OHSU), these newer models from IDM take into account the impact of community-level social distancing interventions, which were not incorporated into the OHSU study. Researchers from OHSU and other hospitals are collaborating with OHA to forecast the COVID-19 burden for their specific hospitals based on this information.

Dr. Dean Sidelinger, state health officer at OHA, said: “These projections tell us the sacrifices Oregonians are making right now can save lives. At the same time, they paint a dark picture of what could happen. We can’t afford to drop our guard.”

March 26, 2020

We are in a critical time for flattening the curve

Projections for new COVID-19 cases show that we’re at a critical moment in the fight against this virus. Social distancing could alter the trajectory of new infections, which will give Oregon’s health care system the chance to ramp up to meet demand. That’s why it is so important everyone takes the Stay Home, Save Lives executive order to heart. We have the power collectively to flatten the curve. We can do this together.

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Health officials and hospitals announce COVID-19 hospital care action plan

The fight against COVID-19 depends on Oregon hospitals having enough beds to treat a surge in patients. Today, Oregon health officials and hospitals announced a statewide action plan to dramatically bolster the state’s ability to treat people with COVID-19 who need hospital care.The plan addresses four urgent actions necessary to expand the health care system’s capacity:

  • Procure and distribute critical medical supplies, including personal protective equipment (PPE) for health care workers and ventilators.
  • Optimize hospital capacity to be able to treat COVID-19 cases.
  • Mobilize the health care workforce to respond to COVID-19.
  • Maintain a unified, coordinated and transparent emergency response to COVID-19.

Read today’s press releasenew projections, and the Governor’s Joint Task Force for Health Care Systems Response to COVID-19 report.

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Helping children cope with the stress they may be experiencing

Children often react to stressful events differently than adults. How the child in your life reacts will vary by age and experience. Children react in part on what they see from adults around them. When parents and caregivers can deal with an event calmly and confidently, they provide can provide strong support for the children in their lives.

You can find more resources and learn about how to support children of all ages by visiting CDC’s Helping Children Cope website.

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Oregon Food Bank is ready to help support those affected by COVID-19

We know COVID-19 has caused uncertainty in many lives, but access to food shouldn’t be one. Pantries and food assistance sites remain open — with increased cleaning and changes in service to help minimize contact among groups of people.

If you’re sick and in need of food assistance, you can send someone else to pick up food at any of the Oregon Food Bank’s distribution sites. If you don’t have someone who can pick up food for you, call your local food bank for assistance. You can find contact information on the Oregon Food Bank website.

Additionally, our partners at @211info have information on more than 1,000 different food programs. For more information call 211 or visit https://www.211info.org/food

COVID-19 has claimed 1 more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 10 to 11, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8:00 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 50 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 316, as of 8:00 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clatsop (1), Deschutes (5), Josephine (2), Lane (2), Linn (1), Marion (14), Multnomah (12), Polk (3), Tillamook (1), Wasco (1), and Washington (8). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website and today new demographic information was added: : www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s eleventh COVID-19 death is a 69-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on 3/15/2020 and died 3/25/2020 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

The Oregon Health Authority is now releasing the daily situation status report, which is produced jointly with the Oregon Office of Emergency Management. It details the overall picture of the COVID-19 outbreak and the response across government agencies. Read more here: https://govsite-assets.s3.amazonaws.com/SLdyToaAQ2i1P0EsaL7t_Oregon-COVID-19-SitStat-03-26-2020-FINAL.pdf

Klamath County Public Health (KCPH) officials have announced a second COVID-19 case in the county.

The information may not be in today’s statewide tally, as KCPH personnel learned of the positive test after the formalizing of Thursday numbers at 8 a.m. It will be released by the state tomorrow.

Contact tracing is underway. The individual is a healthcare worker. Employers assist in the investigation and contact tracing of healthcare workers who have COVID-19. All individuals with risk of exposure will be notified and given directions about next steps.

“Our highest priority is the health and safety of our community. We will take all steps necessary to ensure safety while also holding to our core value of integrity. We will not release the name, address or other identifying information about this person,” said Jennifer Little, KCPH director. “It is a matter of integrity to our team and patient confidentiality.”

Oregon Health Authority releases daily numbers, compiled by 8 a.m. each day, during the noon hour.

The best way to prevent the spread of germs is to:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Stay home when you are sick. Call before seeking medical care.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

In an attempt to answer frequently asked questions relating to the enforcement of the Governor’s Executive Order 20-12 “Stay Home, Save Lives,” the Oregon State Police is offering guidance. 

Is this martial law? 
No, not even close. There are no curfews and a person’s movements are not restricted under the Governor’s Executive Order. While details are offered in the order relating to social distancing, specific business closures and non-essential social gatherings- Oregonian’s movements are generally unrestricted.

Do I need documentation from my employer deeming me essential? 
No. The Governor’s Executive Order closes certain businesses, outlined in section (2). These businesses reflect operations that would make close contact difficult or impossible to avoid. Officers are not asking or looking for any type of special paperwork from your employer.

Do I need a special placard in my car, when going to work or if I drive for work? 
No. There is no special documentation or placards for people going to work or permitted activities.

Will I be pulled over for driving on the highway? 
Not for violation of the Governor’s Executive Order, which specifically outlines efforts to avoid large gatherings- not restrict the movement of Oregonians. If, however, you are committing a traffic violation or crime that would be enforced independent of the order, you may be stopped, like any other day.

Are the state lines closed and are there roadblocks? 
No, traffic is moving freely within Oregon and our border states. There are no roadblocks or restrictions of vehicle movement. Washington State is operating under a similar executive order from their Governor, so Oregonians should be aware of these provisions when traveling in their state.

If my business is closed, can I still go to work if my employer makes me? Won’t I be arrested? 
While the order prohibits the public from congregating at a closed business, the employer may still have work to do on-site. As long as employees are not conducting business that is prohibited by the Executive Order, it is okay to still be at the worksite. No “passes” or paperwork is required.

Are rest areas open? 
Yes, generally. Some rest areas are connected to parks, which are currently closed to comply with the Executive Order.

Are police arresting or ticketing people in public or in violation of the Governor’s Executive Order? 
People that violate the Governor’s Order in an Emergency Declaration could be arrested or cited, which is a C Misdemeanor- the lowest level of criminal conduct designation. All Oregon law enforcement is united on the premise that police action is extremely undesirable and we hope to educate Oregonians if congregating in violation of the Governor’s Order. Citation or arrest would be an extreme last resort if a person failed to comply with the lawful direction of a police officer.

What about my kids that may congregate in a place without my permission, like a skate park? 
Police know our children don’t often take their parent’s advice and may ignore direction when away. Like adults found to be congregating in a location, officers will likely approach the youths and educate them on the order. Citations and arrest are extremely unlikely, reserved for only the most extreme circumstances.

Can I still go hiking and fishing? 
Yes. Oregonians can still recreate outdoors if their recreational activity involves non-contact with others and they can maintain appropriate social distancing- which is defined as 6 feet or more from others. Oregonians and visitors to our state should be aware most campgrounds and boat ramps are closed, so you should research your plans before recreating.

Should I call 911 if I see people congregating? 
No. The level of this violation is not for reporting police, fire or medical emergencies through 911. People may choose to self-educate their fellow Oregonians or if a large gathering is noted, they may call their respective police agency’s non-emergency number.

March 25, 2020, State News

Stay home, save lives

Today we announced the largest number of new cases of COVID-19 in Oregon to date. As testing becomes more available, we will continue to see more cases. We are thinking about everyone who has has been affected by COVID-19, including those who have lost their lives. Staying home now will slow the spread of COVID-19 and save lives. Thank you for working with us to protect the health and safety of everyone in Oregon.

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Medical professionals are needed to volunteer for SERV-OR

The health care workforce is a critical resource in the response to COVID-19. We encourage health professionals to volunteer in the fight against the virus. If you have ever thought about volunteering your time, energy and medical skills to a worthwhile and potentially life-saving cause, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), fellow health professionals and systems, and all Oregonians could use your help.  

To help, you can register with OHA’s State Emergency Registry of Volunteers in Oregon (SERV-OR). Volunteers can join the State Managed Volunteer Pool (SMVP) for statewide deployments or their local Medical Reserve Corps unit (MRC) for local response.

Duties of volunteers can vary widely depending on the need. You may be asked to staff the Oregon Medical Station, help maintain a sterile healthcare environment, operate an information hotline, facilitate the mass dispensing of medications, or support administrative or logistical needs within the OHA Agency Operations Center, among many other tasks. Register at https://SERV-OR.org and learn more at SERV-OR’s frequently asked questions page.

People who are not medically licensed are encouraged to visit Oregon Emergency Management’s COVID-19 information page and complete the survey for finding other volunteer opportunities. https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/6c96b225a8424992b56e59400a30dab4

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Testing capacity continues to increase

Over the past week, Oregon’s COVID-19 testing capacity has expanded as commercial testing has become more available.

We know many people are interested in testing out of concern for themselves and their loved ones. While we’ve authorized health care providers to use their discretion, we know they cannot order a test for everyone who wants one. They will continue to exercise their clinical judgement, as commercial labs work hard to ramp up their capacity. We simply don’t have all the testing capability we want.

If you have flu-like symptoms or have reason to think you might have COVID-19, let your healthcare provider know before you visit. This will help avoid exposing anyone else at the provider’s facility. Your provider may decide to have you first tested for other illnesses, like the flu, based on your possible exposure history and any other symptoms you might have.

For frequently asked questions about testing, go to OHA’s FAQs about coronavirus and search “testing.”

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Oregon Health Authority and Department of Consumer and Business Services set expectations for insurers to remove barriers to telehealth services

Do you need to access physical health or mental health services and are wondering about telehealth coverage? Today the Oregon Health Authority and the Department of Consumer and Business Services provided guidance to insurers that they expect health insurance plans of all types to provide more health care services to their members through telehealth platforms and to encourage plan members to limit in-person health care services for the duration of the COVID-19 outbreak. This includes the Oregon Health Plan and Oregon’s Public Employee Benefits Board (PEBB) and the Oregon Educators Benefits Board (OEBB) plans.

Read today’s press release and view the guidance.

COVID-19 has claimed 2 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from 8 to 10, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8:00 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 57 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 266, as of 8:00 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (4), Douglas (2), Jackson (1), Josephine (1), Lane (1), Lincoln (1), Linn (5), Marion (11), Multnomah (8), Washington (20), Yamhill (1). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s ninth COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Clackamas County, who tested positive on 3/23/20, and died 3/24/2020 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s tenth COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on 3/22/20, and died 3/23/20 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying medical conditions.

State of Oregon News

Governor Kate Brown yesterday, in order to ensure all Oregonians have access to the health insurance they need during this unprecedented public health crisis, called on federal Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar to open a special enrollment period for Oregonians to buy health insurance and apply for federal subsidies through HealthCare.gov. The open enrollment deadline passed on Dec. 15 and does not open again until November. 

“Many Oregonians are uninsured or underinsured and now find their families’ budgets significantly tightened due to this national emergency,” Brown said in a letter to Azar. “In order to remove any potential barriers that remain, it is critical for all Oregonians to have access to a special enrollment period.”

A widespread special enrollment period would allow anyone legally present in the United States to buy a private plan and apply for a subsidy to help afford it. The governor requested that the enrollment period open as soon as possible and last at least 30 days.

Oregon needs Azar to allow the special enrollment period via HealthCare.gov because the application consumers need for federal subsidies, and Oregon’s online system for selection of plans available through HealthCare.gov is run by the federal government. HealthCare.gov sells individual health insurance plans to Oregonians under an agreement with the state and in partnership with the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a division of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services.

“The Marketplace is our state’s pathway to coverage and federal subsidies,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “Until the federal government unblocks the gate to those options for all Oregonians, the only people who can enroll now are those who just lost other coverage or had another major qualifying event.”

The governor’s letter to Azar emphasized the importance of meeting the needs of income-strapped families during a national crisis. 

“Your administration has stressed the value of allowing Americans to make their own coverage choices. During open enrollment last fall, a moderate-income adult might have made a rational decision to skip coverage or buy one of the extremely limited, short-term plans now available under federal rules that currently are not required to cover testing for the novel coronavirus and waive cost-sharing for COVID-19 treatment,” Governor Brown wrote. “A national emergency has changed conditions vastly, and those Oregonians deserve a chance to get the coverage they need.”

News From Klamath County March 24

Klamath County Government offices are closed to walk-in foot traffic.

As a precautionary measure, to help slow the spread of COVID-19, the Klamath County Government offices are closed to walk-in foot traffic effective Tuesday, March 24 – Tuesday, March 31.  County departments will continue to provide services to our citizens by appointment only.  Departments may be contacted via phone or email.  Klamath County Department Directory can be accessed here or go to www.klamathcounty.org.

Oregon News March 24

Oregon reports 3 new COVID-19 deaths, 18 new COVID-19 cases

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to eight, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 8 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority also reported 18 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 209, as of 8 a.m. today. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (3), Clatsop (1), Jackson (1), Marion (2), Multnomah (4), and Washington (7). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s sixth COVID-19 death is a 78-year-old man in Clackamas County, who tested positive on March 15 and died March 22 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. He had underlying medical conditions.

Oregon’s seventh COVID-19 death is a 63-year-old man in Multnomah County, who had underlying medical conditions and was not hospitalized at the time of death. He tested positive on March 16 and died March 23.

Oregon’s eighth COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Washington County, who tested positive on March 19, and died March 23 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying medical conditions.

Stay home, save lives

Governor Kate Brown released a new executive order that takes additional steps to ensure Oregonians stay home in order to slow the spread of COVID-19 and save lives.
You may have questions about what the details of this order mean for the businesses you go to or activities that you usually participate in. But in the simplest of terms, the order asks you to please stay home unless it’s absolutely necessary. In response to the Governor’s order, OHA director Patrick Allen stated:

We know what can happen if every Oregonian doesn’t do their part to slow the spread of COVID-19. We don’t have to do more than turn on our televisions or go on social media to see what’s happening in other parts of the world. We know that our hospitals will be overwhelmed. We know that vulnerable citizens will be particularly at risk to the most serious consequences of the virus.

We’re asking everyone to take these measures seriously. We can all do our part to protect the health of our communities. What you do today can save someone’s life.

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Help us get the message out to all Oregonians to #StayHomeSaveLives

Looking for some simple do’s and don’ts under this new executive order? Wondering which businesses are open or closed? We have social media cards that you can download from OHA’s COVID-19 website and share. Help us make sure everyone has the basic information they need to make good decisions for their themselves and their families.

Stay home save lives
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Governor Brown Tightens Social Distancing Measures, Tells Oregonians to “Stay Home, Save Lives”

Today Governor Kate Brown issued an executive order that included new prohibitions on non-essential social and recreational gatherings, shopping at certain businesses, playground and sport court closures, and new guidelines for childcare facilities. It also requires businesses not closed by the order to implement social distancing policies in order to remain open and requires workplaces to implement teleworking and work-at-home options when possible. The order only permits activities outside the home when social distance is maintained.

A short description of what’s allowed and not allowed as well as today’s press release can be found on Governor Brown’s COVID-19 webpage.

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Oregon reports 30 new COVID-19 cases

Oregon Health Authority reported 30 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 191, as of 8 a.m. today. The new COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (2), Hood River (1), Linn (1), Marion (8), Multnomah (2), Polk (2), Washington (14). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Governor Kate Brown today issued Executive Order 20-12, directing everyone in Oregon to stay at home to the maximum extent possible and adding to the list of businesses that will be temporarily closed to stem the spread of COVID-19 in Oregon. The order is effective immediately, and remains in effect until ended by the Governor.

“We are learning more about this virus and how people react to it every day. Not just from a medical standpoint, but from a social and behavioral standpoint.

“I started by asking Oregonians to stay home and practice social distancing. Then I urged the public to follow these recommendations. Instead, thousands crowded the beaches of our coastal communities, our trails, our parks, and our city streets, potentially spreading COVID-19 and endangering the lives of others across the state. Now, I’m ordering it. To save lives and protect our community.”

“Today, I am issuing a new executive order further requiring social distancing measures because we know this is the most effective way to flatten the curve and slow the spread of this virus. I hope everyone in Oregon abides by its core message: stay home unless absolutely necessary.

“Staying home both keeps you safe from infection, and ensures you do not unknowingly infect others.

“We’ve already put a number of measures forward specifically aimed at increasing hospital capacity, such as cutting down on non-emergency care so we conserve masks, gloves, and gowns to save the lives of the health care workers who are working so hard to save others. All of these things add up, and by slowing the infection rate, we preserve hospital beds so that there will be one available if and when you need it.

“None of us have ever been through this before, and that means there is no way to know exactly what lies ahead. We don’t know yet when this outbreak will end, or what changes this will bring for our state and for our country. But I want to make sure that we’ve done all we can to end it as quickly as possible.”

About the order:

  • All non-essential social and recreational gatherings of individuals are prohibited immediately, regardless of size, if a distance of at least six feet between individuals cannot be maintained. Gatherings of members of the same residential household are permitted.
  • It closes and prohibits shopping at specific categories of retail businesses, for which close personal contact is difficult to avoid, such as arcades, barber shops, hair salons, gyms and fitness studios, skating rinks, theaters, and yoga studios.
  • It requires businesses not closed by the order to implement social distancing policies in order to remain open, and requires workplaces to implement teleworking and work-at-home options when possible.
  • It directs Oregonians to stay home whenever possible, while permitting activities outside the home when social distance is maintained.
  • It closes playgrounds, sports courts, and skate parks, among other types of outdoor recreation facilities. Those that remain open are required to strictly adhere to social distancing guidelines.
  • It outlines new guidelines for child care facilities, setting limits and rules on amounts of children allowed in care, and outlining that child care groups may not change participants.
  • Failure to comply with the order will be considered an immediate danger to public health and subject to a Class C misdemeanor.


Following this order will save lives, while still allowing businesses to function if they can protect employees and customers through social distancing. While many businesses and organizations that are heavily dependent on foot traffic and in-person interactions have already closed or will close under the expanded order, other businesses that make robust plans to meet social distancing requirements—and enforce those requirements—may remain in operation, preserving jobs while ensuring health.

This distinction from closing all businesses except for those categorized as essential as mandated in other states, aims to minimize unintended consequences and add clarity for businesses who can adjust their business models to accommodate vital social distancing measures.

“This order is designed to flatten the curve over the coming weeks, preserving scarce hospital space and equipment. It will also ensure that any place of business that remains operational does its part to enforce social distancing rules,” said Governor Brown. “It is designed to be more sustainable over time, to allow Oregonians to keep their jobs when their work does not add to the growth of COVID-19 in Oregon.”

Retail businesses closed by Executive Order 20-12 include:

  • Shopping: Outdoor and indoor malls and retail complexes, although individual types of businesses not subject to the measures may stay open.
  • Fitness: Gyms, sports and fitness centers, health clubs, and exercise studios
  • Grooming: Barbershops, beauty and nail salons, and non-medical wellness spas
  • Entertainment: Theaters, amusement parks, arcades, bowling alleys, and pool halls


Other retail businesses will not be able to continue to operate unless they can implement strict social distancing measures and designate an employee or officer charged with ensuring compliance. Retail businesses able to adapt to take-out style shopping experiences can also remain open. If businesses can have employees work from home, then they must do so. Many of the businesses outlined in the order have voluntarily closed their doors already, to do their part to protect Oregon’s communities. In addition, non-retail businesses like manufacturers and the construction industry must ensure that their employees are maintaining social distancing measures.

Please read the full details on all businesses listed in the executive order here.

In addition to businesses, Executive Order 20-12 also orders state executive branch offices and buildings to close to the public and provide public services by phone to the extent possible. When public services require in-person interactions, the order requires social distancing measures to be implemented and enforced. State agencies must also facilitate telework and work-at-home for state employees whenever possible. While the order does not apply to local, federal, or tribal governments, those governments are strongly encouraged to follow these directives.

The order also directs state agencies to close parks and other outdoor spaces where social distancing cannot be maintained––expanding on actions already taken by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

All coronavirus executive orders will be posted on the Oregon Coronavirus Information and Resources Page after they have been issued and signed.

State of Oregon

Counties and Tribes receive $4M in state funding to fight coronavirus

The Oregon Health Authority is distributing $4 million to Local Public Health Authorities (LPHA), Tribes and Native American Rehabilitation Association (NARA – the Urban Indian Health Program in Oregon) to support their COVID-19 response. Approved by the Oregon Legislature’s Emergency Board on March 9, this funding is critical to provide support to those doing the frontline work at the local level across the state.

Read more about the funding distribution for each entity in OHA’s press release.

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Make a donation, offer services or volunteer to support COVID-19 response

In support of the COVID-19 response, the Oregon Office of Emergency Management and the State Emergency Coordination Center has established a web page where Oregonians can submit requests to donate services or supplies, volunteer to support or to engage in a business relationship with the state

“We need to rely on our resources and skills to get through this together, and we appreciate people and businesses stepping up to help out in response to this crisis,” said Andrew Phelps OEM Director. “This site better enables the state to accept the appropriate donations, services, and volunteers to help meet the needs of this response. It is a difficult situation, but I am proud of the way Oregonians have come together to support each other and our state.”

The biggest need right now is for Personal Protective Equipment, such as masks, gloves, and gowns.

You can also access COVID-19 information and links to resources here.

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Red Cross faces a blood shortage due to blood drive cancellations

Blood drives are being canceled across the state, leaving blood supplies dangerously low. Healthy people are needed to help patients counting on lifesaving blood. The Red Cross is practicing sanitizing and social distancing policies to ensure you’re safe while donating. Schedule an appointment today.

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Which underlying health conditions make you more at risk for severe illness from COVID-19?

You’ve likely heard that older adults and those with underlying health conditions are more at risk for severe illness from COVID-19. People with underlying health conditions are counting on all of us to help protect their health. If you or someone you know has any of the following medical conditions, they may be at increased risk, no matter their age:

  • Lung disease, including asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (chronic bronchitis or emphysema) or other chronic conditions associated with impaired lung function or that require home oxygen
  • Compromised immune system (immunosuppression) (e.g., seeing a doctor for cancer and treatment such as chemotherapy or radiation, receiving an organ or bone marrow transplant, taking high doses of corticosteroids or other immunosuppressant medications, HIV with a CD4 count <200)
  • Blood disorders (e.g., sickle cell disease or on blood thinners)
  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Chronic liver disease
  • Current or recent pregnancy (in the last two weeks)
  • Endocrine disorders (e.g., diabetes)
  • Metabolic disorders (such as inherited metabolic disorders and mitochondrial disorders)
  • Heart disease (such as congenital heart disease, congestive heart failure, and coronary artery disease)
  • Neurological and neurologic and neurodevelopment conditions
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Oregon reports 1 COVID-19 death, 24 new COVID-19 cases

COVID-19 has claimed another life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll from four to five. The Oregon Health Authority also reported 24 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 161, as of 8:00 a.m. today.

The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (1), Deschutes (1), Lane (1), Marion (3), Multnomah (1), Washington (13) and Yamhill (2). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon’s one COVID-19 death in Linn County is a veteran in his 90’s, who tested positive on March 11 and died this morning at the Oregon Veterans Home. He had underlying medical conditions.

“Our hearts are heavy,” said ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick. “This resident was a veteran who served our nation with honor and dignity in its hour of need. He was also a beloved member of our Lebanon community, and he will be deeply and truly missed. On behalf of everyone at the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs and the Oregon Veterans’ Home, we offer our sincere condolences to his family and loved ones. We grieve with them.”

National News

World Statistics
The death toll from the global coronavirus pandemic has surpassed 12,994 people worldwide and sickened more than 300,000.

United States Statistics
Confirmed Cases.  27,137
Deaths in the U.S. 349

More than 195,000 Americans have now been tested.

In front of the media on Friday evening, Oregon Governor Kate Brown indicated plans to implement a ‘Stay at Home’ order starting soon, although no order has been officially put in place as of Sunday morning.

While no official order was made Friday night by Governor Brown, Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler and Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury the three said they were working on details, which the state planned on announcing soon.  Mayors from many Portland area cities are urging the Governor to make a much stronger stance against the virus as has been done in California, New Jersey, Illinois and New York.

“I’m directing Oregonians tonight to stay home, stay healthy. It’s both an order and public health directive,” stated the Governor.

It remained unclear if the coming stay at home order would impact all of Oregon, or specifically hard hit areas.

Officials did say the order would look similar to the one enacted in California. In California, several businesses are now closed including bars, nightclubs, gyms, convention centers, dine-in restaurants, and entertainment venues.

While Governor Brown did not elaborate much on which businesses would be asked to close under an Oregon stay at home order, she did share praise for theaters and gyms which have already elected to close in an effort to stop the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus.

In the meantime, Governor Brown reiterated her recommendation to all Oregonians to stay at home through the weekend, urging people to only go out for essential business such as picking up a prescriptions or groceries.

The Oregon Health Authority announced another person has died from COVID-19 on Saturday, raising the state’s death total to four.

A 72-year-old woman in Marion County, who tested positive on March 15 died on Friday at Kaiser Permanente Sunnyside Medical Center, health officials said. She had underlaying medical conditions.

The Oregon Health Authority also reported 23 new cases of COVID-19 overnight, bringing the state total to 137.

The breakdown of COVID-19 cases in Oregon is as follows:

  • Benton County: 2
  • Clackamas County: 11
  • Deschutes County: 9
  • Douglas County: 1
  • Grant County: 1
  • Jackson County: 2
  • Klamath County: 1
  • Lane County: 3
  • Linn County: 19
  • Marion County: 19
  • Multnomah County: 18
  • Polk County: 1
  • Umatilla County: 2
  • Union County: 1
  • Washington County: 42
  • Yamhill County: 4

We are monitoring the situation closely and will continue to bring you updates as more information becomes available to us at BasinLife.com.

State of Oregon March 20, 2020, 11:00 AM

Oregon reports 26 new COVID-19 cases

Oregon Health Authority reported 26 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 114, as of 8:30 a.m. today, March 20. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Deschutes (2), Grant (1), Linn (1), Marion (4), Multnomah (5), Union (1), Washington (6), Yamhill (2). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Oregon reports 13 new COVID-19 cases; state prepares Oregon Medical Station

Oregon Health Authority reported 13 new cases of COVID-19, bringing the state total to 88. The COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Linn (2), Marion (5), Multnomah (4) and Washington (2). Oregon Health Authority reports new cases once a day on its website: www.healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

State prepares Oregon Medical Station

The Oregon Health Authority, together with the Oregon Military Department, is assembling the Oregon Medical Station (OMS) beginning Friday, March 19, at the Salem Fairgrounds. The OMS is a temporary mobile facility dedicated to emergency use in situations like the COVID-19 pandemic. The mobile facility will provide an alternate site for 250 patients currently in nursing home care.

The OMS is one component of Oregon’s larger emergency preparedness plan. Here is a snapshot of the facility:

  • It will include beds, pharmaceuticals, medical supplies, and equipment to support 250 patients.
  • It will be staffed by members of the State Emergency Registry of Volunteers in Oregon (SERV-OR) and the Oregon Disaster Medical Team (ODMT).
  • It will have staffing for 24/7 operations.
  • It will be housed in the Jackson Long building at the Salem Fairgrounds in a state-owned building.
  • It will use dedicated supplies that have been stored in Salem at the State and Federal Surplus Property.

Military members from the Oregon Military Department, SERV-OR and ODMT have previous joint training experience for disaster-type events. All three groups have participated in an annual exercise known as Pathfinder-Minuteman, which presents multiple scenarios where first responders have causalities in need of immediate medical treatment.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

Oregon Arts Step Up!

Laser-focused on their missions despite thousands of canceled performances, events and activities, Oregon’s arts and culture organizations are furiously working to continue serving Oregonians: Online.

A recent live-streamed performance by Cappella Romana, produced by Portland Baroque Orchestra, has now been viewed by more than 80,000 people. In a lightning speed response, Portland Baroque today revised its mission temporarily to support other arts organizations and artists as a live-streaming operation.

 “We never cease to be amazed by the creativity and resiliency of Oregon’s cultural community,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission and the Oregon Cultural Trust. “Their financial losses due to the health crisis are staggering, yet they are actively finding ways to engage our citizens, providing inspiration and respite during these very challenging times.”

“Our goal is to keep as many artists working as possible, and to serve the greater community with extraordinary art,” said Abigail McKee, the executive director of Portland Baroque Orchestra. “The arts allow us all to transcend what is happening immediately around us, step outside of ourselves, and be a part of something bigger. PBO has the technology, and we believe it is our responsibility to share it.” More information, including how arts organizations can request a Livestream, can be found at PBO.org.

Other examples of online experiences include daily “how-to” video craft projects at the Pendleton Center for the Arts and a live weekly Music and Movement YouTube show hosted for young children by the One World Chorus. The Youth Music Project is encouraging youth to join its The Power of Music Virtual Concert Series by posting photos or videos of planned or spontaneous performances with hashtag #YMPPowerOfMusic.

In Central Oregon, a new website is dedicated to supporting online offerings and resources by local cultural groups. “The coronavirus pandemic is now touching every part of daily life, including our creative life, but we are a strong and caring community,” said René Mitchell, the founding director of Scalehouse, a member-supported non-profit arts organization located in Bend’s At Liberty Arts Collaborative. “This helps us stay connected during this trying time and supports the people who create so much beauty in each of our lives,” said Mitchell.

Below is a sample alphabetical list of organizations with online offerings, with many more to come:

The Architecture Foundation of Oregon has compiled a list of free at-home design lessons available for all who need them. Included are several of their Architects in Schools lessons and activities. They are also working to post several guided lesson videos hosted by dedicated members of the design community.

Following the cancellation of its ART Gala 2020, Artists Repertory Theatre asked patrons to do a virtual paddle raise by making a tax-deductible donation online.

At Liberty Arts Collaborative in Bend is planning to post a virtual tour of its current exhibition, “Jim Riswold: Russians & Americans & One Italian.”

Bullseye Glass Co. has posted general knowledge information about glass as an art form, and artist interviews as well as exhibition catalogs including Act 2, which tells the story of people who have taken up a new artwork medium later in life. Artist talks, conference sessions, and exhibition are posted on their Vimeo channel

Cappella Romana recently presented a live performance of Tchaikovsky’s “Divine Liturgy” on Facebook Live (produced by Portland Baroque); the performance is now available here and has reached more than 80,000 peopleYou can also access the program book.

The Drexel H. Foundation in Vale, Oregon, is launching a Yard Art Competition to encourage youth and families to embrace art and a positive message: “Kindness.” The winner will receive a $100 cash prize.

Grants Pass Museum of Art is creating a virtual tour and online slide show of its upcoming exhibition “Best of the Best,” an annual show that features student artwork from 14 Southern Oregon high schools. The show will is scheduled to post on the Museum’s website beginning April 7.

The Land Trust Alliance has created a thread in its Ask-an-Expert Discussion Forum to share best practices and lessons learned.

Literary Arts’ The Archive Project, a partnership with OPB, features engaging talks, lectures, and readings from more than 35 years of Literary Arts programming in Portland. 

Metropolitan Youth Symphony Music Director Raul Gomez is doing Virtual Hangouts with students during regularly scheduled Saturday rehearsal time. Gomez provides a view of the score, plays recordings and tells stories about the composer while taking live chat questions from students. Here is a link to the first session on March 14.

In addition to its Dear Oregon blog, and many digital content platforms, The Oregon Historical Society is inviting Oregonians to document this important moment in history by sharing their real-time thoughts. What stories of Oregonians from the past or present are giving you courage? How are you spending your days in this strange new “normal?” What have you learned about yourself, your friends and your family that is giving you strength amidst the chaos? Mail entries to 1200 SW Park Avenue, Portland OR 97205.

As a reminder of the political process still underway, Oregon Humanities invites Oregonians to share the things they’re keeping in their hearts and minds for the upcoming elections in Oregon and across the nation through Dear Stranger, a letter-exchange project that connects Oregonians from different parts of the state through the mail.

The Oregon Humanities Center at the University of Oregon produces an interview show called UO Today. Distinguished scholars and UO professors and administrators sit down for a half-hour interview about their work. The shows are posted on our YouTube channel and recently as podcasts. The channel also features lectures given by guest speakers.

The One World Chorus is launching an online Music & Movement program for pre-K through early elementary-aged youth. The program, to air live at 10:30 a.m. on Fridays on YouTube, is called The Big Up Show. Here is a preview episode.

The School of Arts and Communication at Oregon State University will showcase student work and virtual exhibitions for graduating BFA students in the coming weeks and months on its Instagram account. The goal is to have as many eyes on student work as possible.

The Pendleton Center for the Arts is posting online tours of its galleries and how-to craft projects for all ages. They hope to post one or two activities per day.

The Portland Area Theatre Alliance set up a valentine fund for individual theatre artists

Portland Baroque Orchestra is temporarily changing its mission to offer free live-streaming services to other Portland-area arts organizations (with flexibility about other locations, too). They will provide a live-streaming kit. Viewership of their events (which included a Cappella Romana performance, has already exceeded 100,000 people.

While Portland Piano International fans will wait until August for postponed Anderson & Roe concerts, they can view a video chat by the artists now.

Portland Radio Project announced that Jeremy Wilson, a Portland musician and a founder of the Jeremy Wilson Foundation (JWF) Musicians Emergency Healthcare Fund, is rallying the local community to aid with the financial and medical burdens that the outbreak of COVID-19 is bringing on music professionals in Oregon. JWF started a GoFundMe campaign and you can find details here. Please visit the GoFundMe page to donate.

The Risk-Reward Festival has announced a live stream of Unit Souzou’s performance at 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 21. Risk/Reward is producing the full-length version of this piece in the fall.

Oregon Poet Laureate Kim Stafford has posted readingsa poetry filmpoems accompanied on harp by Bethany Lee and a recent interview with the Oregon State Poetry Festival. He also has poems and photographs posted on Instagram with interactive poetry activities to come.

The High Desert Museum is giving the community a regular glimpse into the Museum with a Museum Moment on its Facebook page every Tuesday and Thursday at 1 p.m.

The Youth Music Project is encouraging young people to grab an instrument (or any rhythm-making object) and post a photo or video of their brilliant home performance with hashtag #YMPPowerOfMusic to join The Power of Music Virtual Concert Series.

Washed Ashore’s newest sculpture, a California Condor made from marine debris, will be placed in Portland’s Oregon Zoo in April. A full-length movie about Washed Ashore is posted here. Their work was recently featured in The New York Times.

The Community Center for the Performing Arts at the W.O.W. Hall will present LIVE STREAM: Full Moonalice: The Time Has Come Revue (Moonalice + T Sisters + The New Chambers Brothers)from 7 to 9 p.m. on Wednesday, March 25.

Governor Kate Brown Announces New Order to Preserve Surgical Masks, Gowns, and Gloves

Portland, OR—Governor Kate Brown today directed all Oregon hospitals, outpatient clinics, and health care providers, including veterinarians and dentists, to cease all non-emergency procedures, in order to preserve personal protective equipment (PPE), such as surgical masks, gowns, and gloves, for health care workers treating COVID-19 patients.

The forthcoming order also limits visitation in hospitals to protect health care workers and at-risk patients from the spread of COVID-19.

“It is critical that we preserve every piece of personal protective equipment we have in Oregon so that our health care workers can keep themselves safe while treating COVID-19 patients,” said Governor Brown. “If we do not take immediate action, the surge in demand in our hospitals for masks, gowns, and gloves will quickly outstrip the limited supplies they have available. We cannot let that happen. I want to thank the health care providers––including dentists, veterinarians, and others––who have already preserved and donated their critical supplies.”

Governor Kate Brown Announces New Executive Order For Higher Education Institutions

Portland, OR—Governor Kate Brown today announced an executive order directing Oregon’s higher education institutions to move their curriculum to online learning, prohibiting in-person classroom interactions through April 28 as a way to prevent transmission of COVID-19.

“I know students have worked hard this school year, and we’re doing everything we can to help them safely finish their learning. But we’re also learning more about this disease every day, and social distancing is key to keeping Oregonians safe,” said Governor Brown. “I understand there are seniors getting ready to graduate this spring, and I want to assure them that our universities and community colleges are working hard to make sure they can get their diplomas.”

The executive order also limits on-campus operations to critical functions, such as dining services and dormitories — all of which are directed to employ social distancing — as a way to ensure students have a safe place to live and eat, since some may not otherwise have housing options.

“Governor Brown’s clear guidance will help Oregon’s colleges and universities statewide to move forward into spring term with the utmost priority placed on the health of our communities, while they continue their educational missions during this extraordinarily hard time,” said Ben Cannon, director of Oregon’s Higher Education Coordinating Commission. “The students, faculty, and staff who are impacted by these changes should know that the important roles they play in this transformation are all critical to helping slow the growth of COVID-19. Shifting almost entirely too remote delivery will help ensure that Oregon’s colleges and universities can continue to prepare thousands of students with degrees and certificates they are working so hard to achieve.”

“In this difficult time, we deeply appreciate Governor Kate Brown’s commitment to helping support Oregon students’ progress to a college degree as all of us collaborate to reduce the risk and spread of COVID-19,” said Ed Ray, president, Oregon State University.

Governor Kate Brown today announced an extension of Oregon’s statewide school closure to a total of six weeks, until April 28, and also issued further guidance for Oregon’s public schools. This follows on an initial two-week closure of Oregon’s schools to end on March 31.

The orders, outlined in Executive Order 20-08, are as follows:

– Schools are to remain closed through Tuesday, April 28, 2020.

– Districts are to provide learning supports and supplemental services to students and families during the closure period, including meals and child care. This includes the delivery of food assistance and offering child care for essential health care professionals and first responders.

– School districts may call on public school educators and employees to deliver limited learning and support services.

– Each district will pay all their regular employees during the closure.

– The Oregon Department of Education, Oregon Health Authority, and Department of Human Services are directed to support public schools in the continuity of mental health services.

“I do not take the decision to extend school closures lightly,” said Governor Brown. “This will have real impacts on Oregon’s students, parents, and educators. But we must act now to flatten the curve and slow the rate of COVID-19 transmission in Oregon, otherwise, we face a higher strain on our medical system and greater loss of life to this disease.”

Governor Kate Brown today also signed the following executive orders that she announced yesterday :

– Executive Order 20-07: Prohibiting on-premises consumption of food or drink and gatherings of more than 25 people

– Executive Order 20-06: Declaration of Abnormal Disruption of the Market Due to COVID-19

All three executive orders take effect immediately.

A complete list of Governor’s executive orders to date can be found here, and Governor Brown’s news releases are posted here.

An open letter to Oregon: You can stop coronavirus in Oregon

Patrick Allen, director of the Oregon Health Authority

Our fight against the coronavirus (COVID-19) has entered a stark new phase. Over the weekend, the first Oregonian lost his life to the virus. Each day, COVID-19 appears in more counties, more communities. Yesterday, Governor Brown took additional extraordinary actions to stop the spread of the virus – limiting public gatherings, restricting restaurants to take out and delivery service and extending school closures.

Social distancing measures are urgent and necessary to slow the spread of COVID-19

These sweeping actions will create profound disruption and hardship in all our daily lives. The impact of these decisions will ripple through homes, schools, communities across Oregon – and through our state economy. These restrictions will demand unprecedented sacrifice from all of us. But they are urgent, necessary and justified in the face of the COVID-19 threat. Every one of us must help. We all have the power to stop COVID-19 and save the lives of people we care about.

I know many Oregonians are worried about whether they or a loved one will get sick from the virus. Across the state, all of us fearful of the fallout from these actions and efforts across the nation to stop COVID-19.

Here’s what we know: Our current projections tell us that, if left unchecked, approximately 75,000 Oregonians could catch COVID-19 by mid-May. Without intervention, those numbers would rapidly continue to expand. No one is immune. There is no vaccine available to stop the virus. There is no treatment.

Most people who contract coronavirus (about 8 in 10) will experience mild symptoms, but during that time you could pass the virus on to others. Yet, Oregon’s hospitals do not have the capacity to treat the remaining 20 percent of patients who may need acute care if people all get sick at once.

We need to flatten the curve of new COVID-19 infections to protect our hospitals

If Oregon’s health care system is swamped by a sudden spike in cases, hospitals in communities across the state will not have enough beds and life-saving equipment, such as ventilators, to manage the crisis. Clinicians won’t be able to save everyone.

But there’s hope: The expanded ‘social distancing’ measures Governor Brown ordered today are designed to slow the spread of COVID-19 and blunt the looming spike in new cases. This is often called “flattening” the epidemiological curve – i.e., spread the number of cases out over time to protect hospitals so they can serve the patients who need them.

Oregon’s health care providers and public health officials have prepared for a pandemic. We have a plan. More than a decade ago hospitals and state health officials designed a blueprint to avert exactly the kind of potential catastrophe we are facing with COVID-19. That plan will help health care providers across Oregon:

  • Manage a surge in demand for medical care and quickly and dramatically expand the capacity to treat more patients.
  • Maintain critical functions.
  • Locate and secure alternate sites to deliver medical care.
  • Secure needed medical supplies, like protective equipment for health care workers.

And we’re putting that plan into action, in partnership with hospitals across Oregon.

You can slow the spread of COVID-19

But our ultimate success in preventing a catastrophe will depend on each of us taking responsibility for these basic actions.

  • All of us need to wash our hands for 20 seconds or more frequently throughout the day. Try to avoid touching your face. Avoid close contact with others (keep a distance of 3-6 feet), especially people who are sick. Work from home if you can.
  • If you are 60 years of age or older, avoid groups of people, including small family gatherings. Stay in your home as much as possible. People your age and above are at the greatest risk of being hospitalized. The same cautions apply for people who have other serious medical conditions (e.g., heart disease or diabetes). If you have a chronic medical condition, you are also at high risk, no matter what your age.
  • If you are sick, stay home and avoid contact with others. Talk to your health care provider if you want to be tested for COVID-19. Talk to your health care provider before you visit a clinic or hospital emergency department. It’s critical for all of us to make sure hospitals are seeing only those people who need hospital care.
  • If you are an employer, direct your employees to work from home if they can. Stagger schedules so fewer people are working together at one time. Send anyone showing symptoms of COVID-19 home.
  • If you are a civic leader: Support protective social distancing actions. Use your voice to encourage people in your community to take responsible steps to stem the spread of COVID-19 among your neighbors.

COVID-19 testing is expanding, but it’s still not enough

We know many people are anxious to be tested for COVID-19. The reality is that Oregon’s state public health laboratory has received limited testing supplies from the federal government.

Oregon health officials have prioritized our limited testing resources for the sickest people and the people who are most at-risk. We know Oregonians would not want us to squander this vital resource indiscriminately.

We are doing all we can to open the testing pipeline. Several large hospitals have committed to begin testing. Outpatient clinicians are ordering tests from commercial laboratories. Those large commercial laboratories are reporting their results to OHA – we include their findings in our daily reports to the public.

However, it’s important for Oregonians to understand testing supplies remain limited due to federal decisions. While we’ve authorized outpatient clinicians to use their discretion, we know they cannot order a test for everyone who wants one. They will continue to exercise their clinical judgment, as commercial labs work hard to ramp up their capacity. We simply don’t have all the testing capabilities we want.

In the meantime, public health officials and our hospital partners will continue to focus our limited testing resources judiciously over the coming weeks, where they are most desperately needed. We will continue to keep Oregonians informed about our efforts to expand COVID-19 testing across the state.

We are all in this together

COVID-19 is in our communities. The virus does not discriminate. We cannot combat COVID-19 if we turn on each other or stigmatize people who test positive and become ill. That only puts sick people and the broader community at-risk because it discourages people from getting tested, getting care and staying home.

But it’s not too late to act. The measures we all take today – from Governor’s Brown’s urgent decisions to the actions each of us takes in our personal lives – will determine how many people our hospitals can treat, how many lives they can save and how long the pandemic will last. We know that places around the world have adopted strong social distancing measures have curbed the pace of new infections. In places that have been slow to act, new cases surged. Lives were lost that could have been saved.

Oregonians have always worked together to overcome daunting challenges. We will do it again to stem the spread of the coronavirus and save lives in our state.

Klamath Community College is making changes to its spring term schedule and course delivery and offerings to help slow the spread of COVID-19. In the two attached releases, please information about KCC extending spring break and moving many courses online for the first two weeks of the spring term.

Here is a synopsis of the changes that are being implemented in response to COVID-19:  

  • KCC will extend spring break one week. Spring term classes will begin Monday, April 6.
  • The first two weeks of spring term — April 6 through April 17 — will be in an online-only format for all in-person lecture classes, conducted via Canvas.
  • As of this time, the KCC campus will remain open for services during regular business hours. During the first two weeks of spring term, campus services for students will be open. 
  • CTE classes, apprenticeship classes, and labs will continue in-person, and faculty will implement social distancing measures. Classes and labs will begin on April 6. 
  • All KCC community education classes are canceled until further notice. 
  • Workforce development courses that were slated to start March 30 now have a delayed start date of April 20. 
  • GED and ESL will begin on April 6. Online GED and ESL courses are in development but are not yet available. 

Please let me know if you have any questions. These updates will be on our website shortly. Look for updates here: https://www.klamathcc.edu/en-US/About/News-and-Events/COVID-19

State announces 18 new COVID-19 cases

Oregon now has a total of 65 people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19. The Oregon Health Authority announced 18 new cases of the novel coronavirus as of 10:30 a.m. today.

OHA is reporting 18 total new cases in the following counties: Clackamas (4), Linn (5), Marion (1), Multnomah (1) and Washington (7). Of the Linn County cases at the Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon, four were previously reported by the Oregon Department of Veterans Affairs in a media released last evening. These results came in after OHA updated its daily count. OHA updates it daily count on the website once a day.

Stay informed

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

March 17 Klamath Falls News Update

ALL KLAMATH COUNTY LIBRARIES
CLOSED UNTIL APRIL 1st
by Nathalie Johnston on March 17th, 2020

Klamath Falls, Oregon (March 17, 2020)—Effective Wednesday, March 18, 2020, all branches of Klamath County Library Service District are closed until April 1st. Currently, public health best practices to reduce the spread of COVID-19 include limiting access to public spaces. Additionally, due to staffing concerns, we have made the decision to follow public health guidance and close to the public.

As a public institution, we did not make this decision lightly. We recognize closure means some of the people who need us the most will not have access to library buildings. We know you care about your library staff. During the building closures, staff will continue to work and be paid. They will be available to help you via email or phone. You can call the main library at 541-882-8895 or email ref@klamathlibrary.org.

To protect employee health, we are following workplace guidelines from County health officials. While our physical spaces are closed, your Library card gives you access to a world of digital content and other services, including downloadable magazines, eBooks and audiobooks; streaming video; educational resources; and language tutorials. Visit https://klamathlibrary.org/ to access digital content.

You should also know:
• We will be extending holds and waiving overdue fees.
• You can still pick-up your holds and drop-off materials in the book drops. In order to pick-up, your holds you will need to call in your library for further instructions. The number will be posted at the library door and on the library website https://klamathlibrary.org/
• You can call your local library for help with placing holds
• Library events are canceled.
• The Bookie Joint is closed.
• Visit our website at https://klamathlibrary.org/coronavirus for COVID-19 information and resources. We will also post information on Facebook.

Your health and safety, as well as that of our staff, volunteers, and Friends of the Library is our top concern. Thank you for your patience as we modify operations during this unprecedented time.

City Offices Shut Down

Posted on: March 16, 2020

Governor announces new restrictions

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced Monday afternoon that she plans to ban gatherings of more than 25 people for at least a month and restrict restaurants and other establishments to serving takeout and delivery food only.

Gov. Brown provided new social distancing procedures:

  • Cancellation of events larger than 25 people
  • Retail stores and businesses are exempt.
  • Avoid gatherings of 10 people or more
  • Restaurants, bars, and other food services will be reduced to take-out and delivery only.

Not complying with these items is a Class C misdemeanor.

Exemptions to the ban include grocery stores, pharmacies, retail stores and workplaces, Brown said in her prepared remarks at a press conference in northeast Portland.

At the same time, Brown urged Oregonians to avoid being around more than 10 people at a time and suggested businesses that can shut down completely should do so.

Klamath Basin News Updated March 16, 11 AM

Oregon Health Authority

Practice compassion
Closing schools, canceling highly anticipated events, and disrupting our daily routines by staying home and away from others causes stress for all of us. This is hard and important work. Take a deep breath. Remember, we are doing this to protect each other, the people we love, and the communities we call home.

How to talk to your kids about COVID-19 and school closures

With schools closed statewide starting tomorrow, March 16, we know families are experiencing a tough time. If your children are feeling anxious, please reassure them that health and school officials are working hard to keep everyone healthy and safe. For tips on talking to your children, here are three resources: Centers for Disease Control (CDC)National Association of School Psychologists Zero to Three

Meals for kids who depend on school breakfasts and lunches

School districts around the state are helping ensure children don’t go hungry during the school closures. Here are quick links to free meals for kids. See below for times and locations.
Klamath County School District
Klamath Falls City Schools
Bend-LaPine Schools
Corvallis School District
Eugene School District
Medford School District
Portland Public Schools
Salem-Keizer School District

New COVID-19 resources posted online daily

We continue to add educational resources and flyers to our website, on topics from cleaning tips for restaurants to fighting Coronavirus racism to updating our searchable FAQ table.

Blood banks need donations

Cold and flu season has already affected the nation’s ability to maintain its blood product supply. As the number of coronavirus cases grows in the U.S., the number of people eligible to give blood and platelets for patients in need could decrease further. Donating is a safe process and people should not hesitate to give or receive blood or platelets. Go to the Red Cross website to learn more. Go here to learn more.

3 new COVID-19 cases

Oregon now has a total of 39 people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19. The Oregon Health Authority announced three new cases of the novel coronavirus as of 11 a.m. today, March 15.OHA is reporting 1 new case in Yamhill County, 1 new case in Deschutes County, and 1 new case in Linn County. The Yamhill County and Deschutes County cases are believed to be community-acquired. The case in Linn County is a staff member at the Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon, which currently has nine residents who have tested positive. The employee was sent home when symptoms appeared and has remained in isolation ever since, in accordance with established infection prevention protocols and public health guidelines.

Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs is working closely with OHA to coordinate and prioritize testing for residents and staff at the Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon.“Protecting our dedicated staff, along with our residents, has always been the highest priority. All infectious disease control precautions were, and continue to be, taken to mitigate the spread,” said ODVA Director Kelly Fitzpatrick. “I cannot speak highly enough of the herculean efforts these staff members have taken to continue to provide exceptional care to our honored residents even before this outbreak. They are truly going above and beyond, and all efforts are being made by ODVA, our state agency partners, and our Linn County partners to support them in their critical work.”Read the full press release for more details.

From the Desk of the Governor March 16, 10:15 AM

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said Monday morning that she is not ready to impose a curfew or broader shutdown on bars and restaurants, despite a new federal recommendation against events with 50 or more people for the next eight weeks.

Brown said her current position on imposing a curfew or ordering restaurants and bars to close temporarily was based at least in part by pushback from elected officials. In a Sunday night telephone call with nearly 200 elected officials from around the state, the governor said she heard that “in our rural communities, restaurants are a key provider of meals to a lot of the elderly and vulnerable folks …”

Oregon Tech Extends Spring Break; Goes Online for Beginning of Spring Term

March 16, 2020, – Oregon Tech is taking additional measures to slow the potential spread of COVID-19 and has announced that the University’s spring break will be extended by one week and all spring term courses will be delivered remotely for two weeks.

Adjustments to operating plans include:

  • Spring break will be extended by an additional week (March 23-April 3) with spring term classes beginning Monday, April 6.
  • All spring term courses (classes and labs) will be delivered remotely for at least the first two weeks of spring term, which is now scheduled to start a week later, April 6.

The change was announced to students and employees March 15 as the university continues to work with partners to increase the availability of online access for all students through arrangements with members of the Southern Oregon Higher Education Consortium (SOHEC) — Rogue Community College, Southern Oregon University, Klamath Community College and Oregon Tech — which have agreed to allow each other’s students to use their computer labs and Wi-Fi networks as needed.

As Oregon Tech remains open during this time to maintain operations, additional measures are being taken to assist employees directly affected by K-12 closures.

Dr. Nagi Naganathan, Oregon Tech’s president said, “All functions of the university are important and must continue to support our students, faculty, and staff. To the greatest extent possible, Oregon Tech will allow and encourage flexible schedules for employees and determine work from home arrangements where able. We will also continue to make every effort to employ social distancing techniques in accordance with the Governor’s and OHA’s guidance.”

As additional COVID-19 information is made available, Oregon Tech will continuously evaluate and update changes to these plans and communicate with the campus community. Full information is available at www.oit.edu/coronavirus.

All March events canceled at Klamath County libraries

Due to concerns about minimizing the spread of the COVID-19 novel coronavirus, the Klamath County Library District has canceled all events at Klamath County libraries through the end of March. The Bookie Joint bookstore is also closed until further notice.

Because older adults are especially vulnerable to COVID-19, the Senior Center Branch Library is also closed until further notice. All other Klamath County libraries will remain open.

The Klamath County Library District is also suspending all late fees until April 1st. Don’t worry about turning in your items; you have more important things to worry about right now.

For the most up-to-date information on this and other measures that Klamath County libraries are taking to prevent the spread of COVID-19, visit the “frequently asked questions” page at klamathlibrary.org/coronavirus or call 541-882-8894.

Governor Brown has ordered all schools in the State of Oregon closed from Monday, March 16th through Tuesday, March 31. School districts have already made plans to send homework or set up Google Classrooms to stem an extension of school into the summer months.

More news to come as updates are available!

Klamath Community College Update March 13, 2020

Klamath Community College knows that the spread of COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) throughout Oregon is of concern to our students, staff, and community. KCC will remain open and is proactively preparing the campus for a coordinated response to COVID-19 while adhering to new statewide guidelines for workplaces and schools to prevent virus transmission.

“The safety of our students and staff is our highest priority,” said KCC President Dr. Roberto Gutierrez. “The college is in close contact with local health authorities and is taking the recommended precautions to ensure our students have a safe and healthful environment to learn in.”

Gov. Kate Brown announced the new guidelines in a news conference this morning. She said they are based on recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Oregon public health experts, epidemiologists, and health professionals.

The state does not recommend that Oregon’s colleges close at this time, and KCC will stay open and operational. However, based on the guidelines, KCC will cancel any field trips or off-campus group activities for classes and student clubs. KCC will also implement distancing measures, including increasing physical space between employees in offices and worksites, limiting in-person meetings, limiting travel when necessary, and staggering work schedules when possible. The college does not currently have any large gatherings of 250 people or more planned to take place in the next four weeks.

In response to COVID-19, KCC Facilities staff is spending extra time cleaning campus buildings, making high traffic areas and common touchpoints a high priority. Additional supplies for sanitizing buildings are being used for the safety of our students, faculty, and staff.

As of March 12, one case of presumptive COVID-19 has been confirmed in Klamath County. The case is not related to the KCC campus. The College is currently monitoring news coverage and recommendations at the state and local level.

“We will work to continually communicate our response plan to all faculty, staff, and students to ensure information is accurate and up-to-date,” Gutierrez said.

KCC embraces technology and should the need arise, the College will utilize technology to ensure the continuance of College courses and operations. KCC is currently working to improve students’ online access to resources in Student Services and academics and will communicate any changes in campus accessibility or course delivery immediately.

Please visit www.klamathcc.edu/en-US/About/News-and-Events/COVID-19 for information about KCC’s
response to COVID-19 and resources for preventing the spread of the virus.

Oregon Institute of Technology Update March 13, 2020

Oregon Institute of Technology, “Oregon Tech,” announced to its university community that it has been working closely with public health and government officials to monitor the spread of COVID-19 and taking measures to protect the health and safety of its students, faculty, and staff. Internal communication to students and employees stressed that Oregon Tech will take every step to remain open and operational to ensure the academic progress of students, including changes for spring term course delivery.

The university is making decisions based on advice from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state health and education authorities in order to protect the university communities and help prevent the transmission of COVID 19; ensure the continued academic progress of students; and, enact changes to limit the spread of COVID-19 by increasing ‘social distancing’ practices.

Dr. Nagi Naganathan, Oregon Tech’s president said, “We are thankful for the guidance that Oregon Tech and the other public universities received from the Governor’s Office, Oregon Health Authority, our county officials, and the Higher Education Coordinating Commission. This close coordination will continue as this situation develops.”

Effective March 23 Oregon Tech is implementing Social Distancing guidance including:

  • University Events: Nonessential employee, department or other university-sponsored gatherings will be limited, with an appropriate exception process for academic delivery and select gatherings.
  • Sporting Events: The NAIA athletic conference is suspending all sports until March 29 or pending further developments.
  • Campus Housing: All student housing facilities will remain open and in normal operations, utilizing social distancing and other precautions.
  • Employee Travel: Nonessential employee travel will be curtailed to the extent feasible.
  • Continuity of Work and Remote Work: When feasible, and with prior approval, employees may be permitted to work remotely.

Social distancing guidance will be evaluated on a frequent basis and adjustments will be communicated to the campus community.

Regarding Spring Break (3/20-3/27) guidance, the university strongly recommended that students, staff and faculty limit travel, particularly international travel or to areas of the United States that have high infection rates. If students and employees have been to areas with high infection rates, or have reason to believe that they have been exposed to COVID-19, or have cold or flu-like symptoms, they should practice increased personal hygiene and social distancing techniques as outlined by the CDC.

Oregon Tech communicated specific guidance for students and employees regarding Spring Term (Effective 3/30):

  • Classes: Spring Term lecture classes will be delivered remotely wherever feasible for at least the first two weeks of classes from 3/30 to 4/10/2020. Additional information will be communicated to students and faculty by Oregon Tech’s Office of the Provost.
  • Labs: Laboratory instruction will continue to be offered in their current modality and as scheduled, with efforts made to employ social distancing practices.
  • Computer Labs: Select computer labs will remain open for student use during Spring Term to ensure all students have access to courses delivered remotely.
  • Clinics Operations: Clinics run by Oregon Tech will continue normal operations until further notice.
  • Student Externships: Students externships and co-ops will continue; guidance will be updated on a regular basis by the department, and the extern partner in consultation with the Office of the Provost.
  • Evaluating Further Steps: Each of these steps will be reevaluated on a frequent basis and adjustments will be communicated to the campus community.

President Naganathan added: “In situations like this we recognize that we cannot eliminate all risk, but we are determined to do all that we can to minimize it by focusing on protecting the health and well-being of our regional and campus communities as well as ensuring our students continued academic progress.”

National News 9:02 AM

Trump to Declare National Emergency to Speed Virus Response

President Donald Trump plans to declare a national emergency on Friday over the coronavirus outbreak, invoking the Stafford Act to open the door to more federal aid for states and municipalities, according to two people familiar with the matter.

The president said he will hold a news conference at 3 p.m. in Washington. Trump spoke Friday with Emmanuel Macron, the French president tweeted, about the pandemic, and agreed to organize a video conference with world leaders on Monday to coordinate research efforts on a vaccine and treatments and work on how to respond to the economic fallout.

Trump is under increasing pressure to act as governors and mayors nationwide step up actions to mitigate the spread, closing schools and canceling public events. Declaring a national emergency would allow the government to marshal additional resources to combat the virus, and also marks a symbolic turning point for the president, who has repeatedly compared the coronavirus to the seasonal flu and insisted that his administration had the outbreak under control.

State of Oregon March 12, 8:52 PM

Six more residents of Veterans’ Home in Lebanon positive for COVID-19

PORTLAND, Ore.—Six additional residents of Oregon Veterans’ Home in Lebanon, where two people were diagnosed yesterday with COVID-19, have tested positive for COVID-19 and are presumptive positive cases, Oregon Health Authority has announced.

The affected individuals include one man between ages 55 and 74 and five men aged 75 years or older. While their illnesses are considered linked to the two earlier cases, the exact sources of their exposures are not known. All have been placed in isolation at the facility.

“Tonight our thoughts are with these veterans and their loved ones,” said OHA Director Patrick Allen. “We are working closely with the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs, the facility’s staff, and Linn County Public Health to ensure they get the best care and support possible.”

The new cases bring Linn County’s total number of presumptive positive cases to eight. There now are 30 cases of the virus statewide, as of 8:13 p.m. today.

“Our deepest concerns are with our now eight veteran residents who have tested positive for COVID-19,” said Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs Director Kelly Fitzpatrick. “Our thoughts are with their families and loved ones, and with our staff at the Oregon Veterans’ Home who are working tirelessly to provide exceptional care to all residents. Our hearts go out to everyone who has been affected by this rapidly evolving pandemic, but we can’t help but feel special concern for what is happening at our Veterans’ Home. These residents are our nation’s heroes. They protected our freedoms and way of life that we now enjoy. It is nothing less than our sacred duty to now fight for them. We will continue to do everything in our power to protect our residents and staff, and mitigate the spread of this virus within our facility.”

Last night, an Infection Control and Specimen Collection Strike Team from OHA deployed to the Veterans’ Home to help support existing and additional infection control practices and help collect specimens. Samples from the suspected cases were brought to the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory early this morning, and test results were released late this afternoon.

On Wednesday, the Oregon Department of Human Services, in consultation with OHA, issued a policy to limit exposure to COVID-19 at long-term care facilities. The guidance directs nursing, assisted living and residential care facilities, including those providing memory care, to:

  • Restrict visitation to only essential individuals.
  • Limit essential visitors to two per resident at a given time.
  • Screen all permitted visitors for respiratory or other symptoms potentially indicating COVID-19, and for recent travel to an affected geographic area or high-risk setting prior to entering the facilities.
  • Document the screenings for all visitors.
  • Limit community outings.
  • Support residents’ access to socialization when visitors are not able to enter the facility through virtual visits.

Health officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19.

3:03 PM

3 new presumptive positive cases bring state’s COVID-19 count to 24

PORTLAND, Ore.–Oregon is adding three new presumptive positive cases to its count of people diagnosed with novel coronavirus, COVID-19, bringing the state’s total to 24.

Clackamas County now has its first case, a man between the ages of 35 and 54 who was a close contact with a previous case. The new Washington County cases are both women older than 55 who had no known close contacts with confirmed cases and are considered community-spread cases.

Washington County now has a total of 10 cases.

Health officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19. Those considered “high risk” include adults 60 and older, or anyone with a serious health condition, including lung or heart problems, kidney disease, or diabetes, or anyone who has a suppressed immune system.

People vulnerable to complications should follow federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations to stay home as much as possible and avoid gatherings.

Every resident should take these basic steps to protect those most at risk:

  • Never visit a hospital or long-term-care facility if you have a fever or cough illness.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home if you feel ill.
  • Call your provider before seeking health care.

The COVID-19 virus spreads like the flu, when someone who is sick coughs or sneezes close to another person (close means about 6 feet).

After someone contracts COVID-19, illness usually develops within 14 days. Symptoms mirror those of the flu, including fever, cough, runny nose, headache, sore throat and general feelings of illness. That has made it more difficult for health officials to identify sick individuals and stop the virus from spreading.

As testing capacity increases–with LabCorp and Quest Diagnostics online, and clinical laboratories at some Oregon hospitals expected to begin testing by next week–officials expect the number of people who test positive with COVID-19 to rise.

Stay informed

March 12, 10 am

Rock and Mineral show canceled, Home and Outdoor Expo Canceled, all school events for all districts outside of normal school with exception of after school program that is part of KFCS, canceled at a minimum for the next month.

Governor Brown mandated 250 and above gatherings canceled, a Press release from Klamath County Fairgrounds effectively cancels all events on the books from today (March 12,) through April 5th. The Press Release states that cancelations could extend further depending on further mandates from the Governor’s office.

Statement from OAHHS (Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems)

Today, Becky Hultberg, President and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS), released the following statement on new COVID-19 guidance from Governor Kate Brown. OAHHS represents Oregon’s 62 acute care hospitals and works on behalf the patients they serve to promote community health and to continue improving Oregon's innovative health care system.

“Two of the most important steps we can all take to prevent the spread of COVID-19 are to wash our hands frequently and practice social distancing. We support the Governor’s decision to limit large public gatherings to no more than 250 people and promote flexible work schedules to reduce interpersonal contact. These steps are recommended by public health experts and will help protect populations that are particularly at-risk – older adults, those with underlying health conditions, and the unhoused. If you have questions about COVID-19, we recommend seeking credible information through the Oregon Health Authority.”

Updated March 11, 1pm
State Announces 4 New Presumptive Positive Covid-19 Cases

Oregon now has a total of 19 people who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since Feb. 28 after the Oregon Health Authority announced four new presumptive positive cases of the novel coronavirus today.

OHA confirmed one new case each in Polk, Marion, Umatilla, and Deschutes counties. None of the new cases involved travel to a country where the virus is actively spreading. The Polk, Marion and Deschutes cases had no known close contacts with confirmed cases, so they are considered community-spread. The Umatilla County case is close contact with that county’s first case.

OHA and Polk, Marion, Umatilla, and Deschutes counties are working to identify and isolate any individuals who may have been in close contact with the cases in the last 14 days.

“I know it’s difficult to learn that we are seeing more active community spread of COVID-19, but this is something we’ve been expecting,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed, health officer and state epidemiologist, OHA Public Health Division. “It’s a good reminder to take steps to protect yourself, and vulnerable friends and family members, by washing your hands, covering your coughs and sneezes, and staying home if you’re sick.”

Health officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19. Those considered “high risk” include adults 60 and older, or anyone with a serious health condition, including lung or heart problems, kidney disease, or diabetes, or anyone who has a suppressed immune system.

People vulnerable to complications should follow the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations to stay home as much as possible and avoid gatherings.

Every resident should take these basic steps to protect those most at risk:

  • Never visit a hospital or long-term care facility if you have a fever or cough illness.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Stay home if you feel ill.

The COVID-19 virus spreads like the flu when someone who is sick coughs or sneezes close to another person (close means about 6 feet).

After someone contracts COVID-19, the illness usually develops within 14 days. Symptoms mirror those of the flu, including fever, cough, runny nose, headache, sore throat and general feelings of illness. That has made it more difficult for health officials to identify sick individuals and stop the virus from spreading.

As testing capacity increases — with Labcorp and Quest Diagnostics online, and clinical laboratories at some Oregon hospitals expected to begin testing by next week — officials expect the number of people who test positive with COVID-19 to rise.

Stay informed

First Multnomah County resident tests positive for COVID-19

The Oregon Health Authority today announced Multnomah County’s first presumptive positive case of COVID-19. The new case brings Oregon’s total to 15 cases in seven counties.

OHA and Multnomah County are working to identify and isolate any individuals who may have been in close contact with the person in the last 14 days.

This case is being treated at the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center. The individual had no known contact with a confirmed case and had not traveled from a country where the virus is circulating, so the case is being investigated as a community-acquired case.

“I can only imagine the concern among the family and friends of this person,” said Jennifer Vines, M.D., lead health officer for the tri-county region. “I’m asking you, as my neighbors and as my community, to keep this individual and their loved ones in your thoughts. And let us all do what we can to minimize the number of other people who must go through this.”

Health officials continue to urge all Oregonians to take steps to protect those who are most vulnerable to complications from COVID-19.

Those considered “high risk” include adults 60 and older, or anyone with a serious health condition, including lung or heart problems, kidney disease, or diabetes, or anyone who has a suppressed immune system.

People vulnerable to complications should follow the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations to stay home as much as possible and avoid gatherings.

Every resident should take these basic steps to protect those most at risk:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.
  • Stay home if you feel ill.

The COVID-19 virus spreads like the flu when someone who is sick coughs or sneezes close to another person (close means about six feet).

After someone contracts COVID-19, the illness usually develops within 14 days. Symptoms mirror those of the flu, including fever, cough, runny nose, headache, sore throat and general feelings of illness. That has made it more difficult for health officials to identify sick individuals and stop the virus from spreading.

As testing capacity increases — with Labcorp and Quest Diagnostics online, and clinical laboratories at some Oregon hospitals expected to begin testing by next week — officials expect the number of people who test positive with COVID-19 to rise. Also on Tuesday, the Oregon State Public Health Laboratory received eight additional testing kits from the CDC, which allows for testing of up to 4,800 people.

“We are not going to isolate and quarantine our way out of this pandemic,” Dr. Vines said. “We are working with our partners on mass gathering guidance, at schools, places where people gather and mix, to spread people out.

“We are not talking anymore about stopping the spread of this virus,” she said. “Without a vaccine and without medicine, our best bet as a community is to slow the spread so those who do get seriously ill can get the care they need from our health system.”

Stay informed

Oregon Health Authority Coronavirus Update March 9

No new cases of COVID-19 today
D
ata are provisional and change frequently, but here are the current totals:
*226 are still under monitoring
*291 have either completed monitoring or were determined to have no risk
*Samples for 52 patients await results
*Samples for 165 patients have tested negative for COVID-19
*Samples for 14 patients have tested positive. One of the presumptive positive tests has been confirmed by the CDC.
Support those at higher risk
CDC has reported that older adults may be at a higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19 and we know many of you are wondering what this means for the health of your loved ones.

We know how important it is to protect our parents, grandparents and other vulnerable populations. We all have a role to play in protecting at-risk groups. Here are some things you can do to protect the older adults in your life and those at higher risk.

Presumptive Coronavirus Cases In Klamath County – Links and Up-To-Date Information

Klamath County officials talked about the county’s first presumptive case of the COVID-19 Coronavirus at a press conference over the weekend. Here are the latest update and information and links for you.

Officials say the case is travel-related, just like two cases in Jackson County also announced Saturday morning along with another case in Washington County that is believed to be community spread.

Officials aren’t releasing any information about the patient in order to preserve the patient’s privacy. Klamath County Public Health Officer Dr. Wendy Warren also declined to comment on if there were any other people in the county being monitored or tested, although KCPH is contacting anyone they believe might have been in contact with the patient enough to put them at risk.

KCPH Director Jennifer Little said they monitor known contacts of someone who tested positive for symptoms for two weeks.

“As soon as the notification of a presumptive case was received, public health began working to identify all close contacts and proper notification to include a risk assessment. Contact investigation, allows public health to ensure that those at risk are monitored for development of any signs or symptoms,” she said. “Contacts are monitored for 14 days following their last known exposure and are cooperating fully at this time. There is no identified risk to the greater community in Klamath County, and there is no community spread at this time.”

The four additional cases announced Saturday to bring the state’s total to seven, with five of those occurring in patients between the ages of 55 and 74 and the other two cases in patients 35 to 54, according to the OHA’s website. Three of the cases have been linked to travel while the other four are considered to be community spread. Five patients are hospitalized, and the other two are not.

The state is still waiting on 40 test results, as of Saturday morning, and 77 tests have returned negative since January.

Warren said there’s no need for panic in the community and reminded people that contracting the disease requires prolonged close contact of fewer than 6 feet between people for at least an hour.

“At this point, there is no reason to be alarmed, and the community is encouraged to continue practices that reduce exposure to germs,” she said.

Warren admitted that officials don’t know much about the virus yet and are learning more every day. One factor officials don’t know yet is how long the virus lives on surfaces.

The county is building on the plans developed in 2009 for the H1N1 swine flu virus, Warren said and refining them to fit this virus.

Warren said Public Health might not know all of the people being tested for the virus in the area because private labs are now testing for the virus as well. Previously all tests were sent to the Oregon Health Authority’s lab. She said this is because the state lab only has the capacity to test 40 people per day.

“We need to have a broader capacity, so other routes are being developed,” Warren said.

Any positive tests at private labs would be reported to the county, she said.

While cases that test positive in the state are considered “presumptive” until confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control, Warrens said they don’t wait until they have a confirmation to take action.

“If we have what we call a presumptive case, that means that they had a positive result, at this point, from our state lab. And at that point, we treat them as though they have Coronavirus, then their samples are sent off to the CDC who then do confirmatory testing,” she said. “But at this point, anyone who came back with a presumptive case is being treated as though they have it.”

Warren reminds people that if you think you have symptoms of the virus to call your health care provider before you come into the office.

Oregon Tech preparation

Oregon Institute of Technology deployed a response team, according to a news release, to develop a plan in case the virus reaches campus or those who spend time there.

The university also has a website for information about the disease as it pertains to students and staff where it warns students to consider avoiding travel to areas with COVID-19 cases as Spring Break approaches March 23 through 27. Oregon Tech has not issued any travel bans, according to the website, but asks that if any students become sick that they delay returning to campus until they don’t have a fever for 24 hours.

Sky Lakes facility

Sky Lakes Vice President of Medical Affairs Dr. Grant Niskanen described the facility at Sky Lakes where they would isolate someone who tested positive for the illness as a negative pressure room where the air from the room is vented outside of the building and doesn’t circulate in the hospital’s ventilation system. He also said they have the necessary equipment for health care professionals who would treat any patients to keep them safe from the disease as well.

“If someone comes into the emergency room, and they have a flu-like illness, they’re immediately placed in isolation,” Niskanen said.

While other hospitals and clinics around the country are facing shortages of masks, Niskanen said Sky Lakes is in “okay shape.”

Niskanen said Saturday that he expects to see more cases in the area.

Despite the virus reaching the area, Warren did not recommend any school closures Saturday. She instead reminds people to stay home if sick and to take precautions to stop the spread of germs.

Although symptoms of this Coronavirus can be similar to the flu, Warren noted the flu can often spread before a person has symptoms, but that the Coronavirus typically spreads after someone begins to have symptoms.

Current Outbreaks Across the Nation

  • Total cases: 423
  • Total deaths: 19
  • States reporting cases: 35 (includes District of Columbia)

* Data include both confirmed and presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 reported to CDC or tested at CDC since January 21, 2020, with the exception of testing results for persons repatriated to the United States from Wuhan, China, and Japan. State and local public health departments are now testing and publicly reporting their cases. In the event of a discrepancy between CDC cases and cases reported by state and local public health officials, data reported by states should be considered the most up to date.

Travel-related72
Person-to-person spread29
Under Investigation322
Total cases423

Current Outbreaks in the State of Oregon

As of 3/9/20, there are 14 reported cases of Covid 19 in the State of Oregon.

From the Centers For Disease Control – What You Need To Know About Coronavirus

Read Here How To Protect Yourself

Oregon State Health Agencies Issue COVID-19 Guidance To Oregon Schools and Universities

Health officials recommend taking steps to prevent infection and keeping schools open

Public health experts at the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and education officials with the Oregon Department of Education and the Higher Education Coordinating Commission today issued guidance and best practices from public health experts to schools, colleges and universities for decision-making concerning the novel coronavirus in Oregon.

At this time, the guidance recommends not closing schools and campuses where no cases of COVID-19 are present. It also recommends that schools, colleges, and universities consider all alternatives before closing a school, college or university in the event that a COVID-19 case is detected among students or staff. The guidance identifies important strategies educational administrators can use to reduce the risk of COVID-19 within a school community and protect students from lost instructional time.

The guidance recognizes that the instruction schools and universities provide is vital to student well-being. In addition, schools provide many students their only ready access to health care and food. More than 22,000 students in Oregon experienced some form of homelessness in 2019.

The recommendation gives schools tools to prevent COVID-19 transmission and maintain a normal learning environment for students and staff. Under existing OHA guidance, individuals who have COVID-19, including students and educators, will be subject to self-isolation to prevent others from becoming infected.

Among the measures that educational institutions should consider are increasing the frequency of handwashing for children, youth and adults; cleaning high-touch, high-traffic areas within schools frequently, and screening for illness among students, staff and visitors. The policy also highlights more aggressive measures involving social distancing strategies that school leaders and educators could employ to minimize the spread of COVID-19 or other infections. This could include staggering recess and lunch periods to reduce the number of students coming into close contact with each other.

The recommendations are meant to guide decision-making for school districts, colleges, and universities, in consultation with state and local health officials. School districts and higher education administrators have the option of closing a school or university if many students and staff are affected by COVID-19, leaving the school unable to operate safely and effectively. Other measures, such as social distancing techniques, should be deployed by schools and universities first, with extended closures viewed as a measure of last resort. For example, an adult-serving institution with options for shifting to remote instruction without severe community disruption may weigh the recommendations differently.

OHA state health officer Dr. Dean Sidelinger said, “We know many parents, students and educators are worried that COVID-19 will appear in their school communities. We want schools and universities to know there are steps they can take to prevent infection and keep students safe, healthy and learning in the classroom.”

State health officials issued the guidance after extensive consultation with local public health officers, state medical experts, and educational stakeholders and leaders, including educators, parents, school district superintendents, school board members, and higher education officials.

David Bangsberg, M.D., M.P.H., Dean of the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health said, “This recommendation represents a reasonable and thoughtful approach given the information that is available at this time. This is a dynamic situation and will require a continued partnership between schools, colleges and universities and the public health community to make real-time decisions for each situation.”

 “I appreciate the strong partnership and guidance from the Oregon Health Authority as Oregon rallies in response to the COVID-19 challenge,” Oregon Department of Education Director Colt Gill said. “Keeping schools open is the best option for our state and, most importantly, for our students. Our safety efforts should focus on practicing good hygiene, staying home when we are not feeling well, and cleaning surfaces in our schools. We can all play a part with these simple steps to protect ourselves and our friends, classmates, and community.”

Ben Cannon, Executive Director of the Higher Education Coordinating Commission said, “Close coordination between Oregon’s colleges and universities, the HECC, and the Oregon Health Authority is helping to ensure that we keep students, faculty, and staff safe while minimizing educational disruptions. We appreciate the OHA for the clear guidance it is providing to Oregon’s colleges and universities today, and we’ll continue to work closely with OHA as this situation evolves.”

Dr. Ed Ray, President of Oregon State University said, “The health and safety of our students, faculty, and staff is the top priority for every higher education institution in Oregon. We appreciate the guidance from OHA and the Governor’s office as we prepare and respond to the evolving outbreak. We will continue to work closely with state and local public health officials.”

“Maintaining the health and safety of Oregon’s students, families and communities is always a top priority for our educators,” said Oregon Education Association President John Larson. “We appreciate the Oregon Health Authority’s use of sound, science-based guidelines as health and education leaders work together to decide what is best for our students. Based on the available research, that means keeping our public schools open.”

Jim Green, Executive Director of the Oregon School Boards Association, said, “Our health and education leaders in Oregon are working closely together as this situation evolves. Our primary goal is keeping kids and communities safe, and what research and experience are telling us now is that we should be trying to keep our schools open as we work through this.”

Kristi Dille, president of Oregon PTA said, “I’m thankful OHA and ODE are sending a strong signal to parents and other members of the community that our schools should stay open. This clear guidance allows us to meet the needs of students and families.”

“The health and safety of our students, faculty, and staff is the top priority for every higher education institution in Oregon,” said Chief Resilience Officer and Associate Vice President for Safety and Risk Services Andre LeDuc. “University of Oregon appreciates the Higher Education Coordination Commission and Oregon Health Authority’s coordinated efforts to share fact-based information to assist all campuses in Oregon in preparing and responding to the evolving outbreak.”

OHA continues to recommend that all people in Oregon take everyday precautions to prevent the spread of many respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19 and influenza: Cover your coughs and sneezes, wash your hands often with soap and water for 20 seconds, avoid close contact with people who are sick and avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

Most people with COVID-19 have mild symptoms. If you are feeling sick with mild symptoms and do not need to seek medical care, stay home while you recover. If you are sick and plan to seek care, please call before going in for care so arrangements can be made to prevent exposing others. For urgent medical needs, call 911.

Students, families and school staff can find more information about COVID-19 at:

Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems 

Becky Hultberg, President, and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS), released the following statement regarding Governor Kate Brown’s declaration of a state of emergency due to the outbreak of COVID-19. OAHHS represents Oregon’s 62 acute care hospitals and works on behalf of the patients they serve to promote community health and to continue improving Oregon’s innovative health care system. 
 
“By declaring a state of emergency, the Governor and the Oregon Health Authority Director are taking necessary steps to bring the state government’s broad powers to respond to the outbreak of COVID-19 in Oregon. We support the Governor’s leadership in taking this step and support any additional actions to prepare and respond to this outbreak, particularly her focus on at-risk populations – older adults, those with underlying health conditions, and the unhoused. OAHHS and our member hospitals are in regular communication with the administration and local health departments to deliver accurate information and quality care to our patients and the public. Hospitals are on the front lines responding to the outbreak and are committed to providing critical inpatient and community health services to respond to this evolving situation. We are working with the state administration to address important issues such as inpatient capacity, additional supplies, and equipment to keep our workers and patients safe, regulatory relief to ensure adequate staffing and clarity around changing requirements. We look forward to addressing these issues as we continue to fulfill our responsibilities around public health, infection prevention, and disease management.” 

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